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Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Well, I finally got off my rear end and threaded some pipe and built the 3 burner setup for my brewstand. I've been using 3 different hoses and regulators and 2 tanks all damned summer and it's horrible. Now I'm running one 100lb(!!) tank, one 30 psi regulator and 3 burners off of a manifold. 3/8" pipe and I can run the burners at different levels at the same time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mzdo9cgDGJw


Tomorrow, I'm taking it all back off and painting the stand properly. It's still got a random dusting of engine paint that I tossed on before a rushed brewday just to keep some rust away.

I also finally remade my MLT insulation with some nifty velcro to hold it on around the sightglass, and I ground down some street L fittings and now I have nice full flow stainless camlocks.


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Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Huge_Midget posted:

Where did you get/what did you use for insulation wrap on your mash tun?

It's Reflectix.
http://www.homedepot.com/buy/buildi...tion-20958.html
It's pretty much bubble wrap with foil on both sides. The problem is that it's not terribly heat resistant, so if you fire the mash tun with it on, it will melt into goo. 3 layers of it DOES insulate pretty well though. You need a good foil tape too (nashua brand is probably the best), and if you tape up all the loose ends of the insulation it holds it's shape nicely.

I'll be replacing it with something that can handle more heat soon, most likely this stuff, or possibly some kind of captured wool fiber.
http://www.mcmaster.com/#9349k2/=e73cvu

Or I'll just finish my drat eRims tube and stop worrying about it.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


After hours of grinding and general hilarity, I painted my brewstand properly and mounted the gas setup.

Heat resistant paint on the top half of the stand looks like rear end thanks to the giant halogen light illuminating it. Otherwise it looks nice and matte.




It turns out that nearly half a million BTU's of jet burner will ice up a normal propane tank in about 2 minutes
Thankfully,

Tadaa

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


mewse posted:

bottling day!!



HOLY GOD, why didn't I ever think of tipping the bucket in the sink.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Docjowles posted:

I am thoroughly jelly, nice work! I am a total DIY retard so if I want a nice brew stand I'm pretty much relegated to giving Blichmann Engineering or MoreBeer or someone my life savings. As much as I love brewing that's pretty far down my life priority list so I deal with lifting lots of hot, heavy poo poo on brew day. Some day...


I actually agree with this, too. All grain is a ton of fun and once you reach a certain level of obsession you just can't stand dumping extract in there and losing that control. But from a pure beer quality standpoint I totally buy into the cold side argument. Put money into fermentation temp control before anything else and your partial-boil extract beer will be way better than the dude that's brewing all-grain and fermenting at 80 degrees. I also found starters to be a BIG help for me but YMMV on that depending on what you brew and how fresh your yeast is.

The really awesome way to go is to find a homebrewer who has built a stand or two and have him build you one. Hell, I'm thinking of getting more steel and building a new stand and selling this one, purely because I've got a lot more ideas on ways to improve it and then I can sell the old one for $150 bucks and completely recoup my costs.

Also, with that stand I still go and throw one pot on it and do no-chill extract batches and I LOVE doing it.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


indigi posted:

$150? For that? Where do you live?

Haha, NE Ohio.

I'd be selling it around the end of next summer, and probably for a bit more than $150 after I've done the windshields. My pump shields are going to be sealed top and front with air intake on the bottom so that the pump heads can be sprayed down to get hot sticky wort off of them and I'll sell those separately as I want to remake those in stainless as well.

I've got a lot of hours into it, but the steel as it sits was only about $80. It's good practice for me. Hell, I might just get more mild steel and build a copy of it and sell it.


Maybe I should sell it for more than $150

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Darth Goku Jr posted:

Wait, are you in LMHBA? S.N.O.B.S.? To think we might've met...

Which is to say hell yes I'm in good shape to negotiate for a cheep brew stand.

I keep meaning to join SNOBS, LMHBA and SAAZ but I constantly forget to do it. For being so obsessed with homebrewing, I'm not really active in the community. I need to start because I'd absolutely love to build some giant burner stands and get something exciting going like 55 gallon club batches to fill barrels and fun things like that.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Acceptableloss posted:

I inherited what I *think* is a 15.5gal sankey keg as well. I want to get a false bottom for it in order to use it as a mash tun. It already has the top cut out and a 1/2" swagelok valve installed in the side about 4" from the bottom weld seam.

Is this thing what I want?

http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewi...less-elbow.html

How does a 12" diameter false bottom fit a 15" diameter vessel? And how does it maintain a seal with the bottom of the keg?

If you intend on direct firing the mash tun to bring the temps up for mashout, maintaining temps, etc than you would do better to pick up a 15" folding false bottom. The 12" ABT false bottom is great, don't get me wrong, but the amount of liquid that it holds underneath it isn't very large, and flame underneath a sanke keg will hit the areas of the false bottom that don't contain any water, just grain. Might not be a problem, but it does mean you have to be extremely careful adding fire to bring up the temp.

Something like this pretty much solves the problem by making the entire domed bottom of the sanke full of nothing but liquid.
http://www.norcalbrewingsolutions.c...se_Bottoms.html
You'd be looking for the 15" folding false bottom, handles and fun stuff are optional.
If you've already got a bulkhead fitting in the keg, you can take some measurements and pictures and just email the guy and he'll set you up with whatever else you need (like the diptube).

(I'm seriously not affiliated with that guy at all, he just makes extremely nice, ridiculously heavy false bottoms).



e: This is my old ABT false bottom.

You can see it doesn't enclose the domed bottom completely. It was still an awesome false bottom and I keep it in my HLT for double batches, you really just have to be really gentle with the flame and stir and recirculate constantly while firing it.

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at Sep 29, 2011 around 14:33

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Anybody else playing with squeezed apples this year?

I've got 5 gallons of hard cider fermenting, 5 gallons of apfelwein fermenting, 2 gallons of fresh cider in the fridge to drink now, and 3 gallons of fresh sparking cider carbonating in a keg.

The intention being that people can mix sweet sparking cider from my beer faucets with hard cider or clear apfelwein, both of which will be hugely dry.

I'm using montrachet yeast in both the hard cider and the apfelwein because while it smells awful fermenting, it ferments way, way down and tastes wonderful after a couple months of conditioning. I've done it with beer yeast and champagne yeasts and I really just prefer the montrachet wine yeast.

Plus it's like 50 cents for a packet. Toss in some nutrient and oxygenate the hell out of it and throw it in a dark corner for a few months and hurray!

My only issue is that I have no idea how long fresh cider is going to last in a keg. It'll be an all co2 environment and around 36-40 degrees.. It'll definitely be interesting. I don't know what else I can do to keep everything that's potentially living it in killed.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Plastic Jesus posted:

I've left cider in the carboy where it fermented for 2-3 months and it just gets better (that was spiked with dextrose, though). I'm sure it'll be fine in a keg.

Oh, I don't mean the hard cider or apfelwein (hell, I'm still drinking a batch of apfelwein from a keg that I made last august), I mean that I intend to throw 3 gallons of fresh, unfermented cider into a keg to force carbonate.


My only worry is that even in a 36-40 degree keg under co2, it might still slowly spoil/ferment/potentially become dangerous, being nothing but a big pile of sugar and water.

I don't know if a nearly completely pure co2 environment will retard any spoilage of fresh cider? I was considering pitching sorbate into the keg in the hopes that it'll kill off any natural beasties from the squeezer, etc.

The guy I bought the cider from uses UV light to kill anything living in the cider and I brought him carboys wet with sanitizer, but I don't know how clean his filling equipment is, where he left the cork while he was filling, how much dust was in the air, etc.

I'm also not sure how sorbate reacts inside a serving vessel. If it doesn't all go into solution, I'd hate to have it sitting at the bottom of the keg to get sucked into a glass. I can't imagine a higher concentration of sorbate in somebody's drink is particularly good for them. If it stays in solution it shouldn't be a problem though.

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at Oct 1, 2011 around 00:19

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Acceptableloss posted:

Care to share your apfelwein recipe? I've only had it once, but it seems like a perfect fall drink.

It's pretty simple, and basically just the one that keeps floating around the internet (namely HBT).

5 gallons of jug apple juice, only preservative is ascorbic acid
Montrachet Yeast
1 lb Dextrose (or 2 if you're feeling like making it stronger)
Yeast Nutrient

Pour 3 or 4 of the jugs of apple juice into a sanitized carboy (I get all obsessive and after I've just cracked the lids on the juice to the point where it's about to break the safety seal/whatever, I spray a bunch of starsan up into the threads), dump half of another jug into the carboy, pour the dextrose into the jug, shake the gently caress out of it to dissolve, pour it into the carboy.

Usually before I add anything, I pour in my rehydrated yeast and nutrient, although you can just sprinkle it in, but it'll likely clump up.
I oxygenate for about 60 seconds, throw an airlock on it and let it ferment out and condition for at least 4 months, preferably more like 6-8, then just keg it.

It comes out super super dry and clean, with a nice big bright apple flavor. Super tasty all on it's own, even tastier drank in quantity with some fresh sparking cider added to it (or Sprite, 7up, etc if you're feeling trashy).

e: This post is already long, but here are some pictures, because pictures are cool.


Since these will sit around for a long long time and montrachet has a gigantic ferment temp range, it's just sitting in a 64 degree room where it'll stay for a few months. I may move it to a ~75ish degree room for the last couple months to speed aging, but I'm conflicted on the idea.


cider fermentation is pretty cool and creamy looking.


apple juice fermenting is extremely boring, but watching the fast streams of co2 coming from everywhere is pretty cool.

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at Oct 2, 2011 around 22:59

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


I believe it. I love Montrachet, but it sure as poo poo takes a long time to ferment out and get some actual pleasant flavor development.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Keeping it cold doesn't change the quantity, the high pressure gauge is just designed to work at a certain temperature.

Keep it wherever it's most convenient. I've got mine inside the fridge just because I don't need the room yet

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Darth Goku Jr posted:

what kind of ABV can Montrachet yeast handle as opposed to danstar's pasteur champagne? I'd like to try it in my pseudo-cyser recipe but I don't know what Montrachet can handle

here is my recipe i used for the first batch:
5 gallons local orchard cider
4# local wildflower honey
1# un-local as hell brown sugar
champagne yeast

if i replaced the pound of brown sugar with two pounds more of honey, how much more fermentable sugars can i reasonably expect? would montrachet still get me pretty dry?

I think pasteur champagne can do somewhere up to 15% abv. I've personally had montrachet ferment down to 11% and it seemed like it struggled a little bit but apparently it can hit 13% according to redstar.

Honey and brown sugar should be pretty much the same in terms of fermentable sugar, I believe. With my stronger ciders, montrachet will still dry out extremely well (like 1.001 or lower), but my 11abv experiment only went down to 1.04. Still super dry on the palate though.


e:

indigi posted:

I've never had this problem once my wort was where I wanted it, and didn't know it was something others had to deal with. Seems like a super powerful freezer to continue cooling 5 gallons of liquid in the fridge once the compressor is off. The only time I've had wort cooler than I wanted was when I was cooling it from 80* to 60*, and when I checked it was at 55*.
My trick has been to throw the fermenter in the fridge and leave the probe off of it for an hour or 3 and let the ambient temperature in the fridge stay exactly at my intended wort temperature. It gives it time for everything to equalize and you obviously aren't going to get any heat rise from yeast in 1-3 hours. After that I throw a little more oxygen into the beer and tape the probe to the side or put it in a thermowell through the stopper.
If I had trouble hitting pitching temp within a couple degrees and my yeast is low 70 degrees off the stirplate, I'll delay pitching for an hour or two and leave the yeast and the carboy together in controlled ambient to equalize.

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at Oct 3, 2011 around 04:17

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Docjowles posted:

I know autolysis is basically a bogeyman these days, but you don't have any problems with the cider sitting in primary more than half a year? Is that something specific to wine yeast like Montrachet? I have no experience at all with wine yeasts. I'm hoping to make a batch or two of cider this fall.


Well, apparently autolysis in wine isn't a bad thing (although cider isn't wine, I suppose it could be an effect of the specific yeast rather than the fermentables), but it's a pretty good pitch of yeast, they start quickly and ferment pretty strong. I've left beer on yeast for 6 months and never gotten any kind of autolysis that I could detect, either in the beer or in the yeast cake after I eventually racked it off.

The apfelwein and cider I've been making and actually liking has all been the same stuff and same process, 6 months conditioning in the carboy and then a month or so in a keg before I remember to try it. It's pretty damned delicate and crisp and any of the autolysis flavors would really REALLY come through.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


So, I'm doing a stout this weekend with a friend who's also brewing a yeti sort of stout (coffee, oak, big and american hopped).

I'm working on my recipe still, and I'm sort of conflicted. I want to play with some cold-steeped (in the beer) coffee, and cocoa nibs.
What I'm looking for from it is to be quite dry but avoid being astringent and overly roasty which dryness can accentuate to some extent. I'm also considering a pound or so of oats to try and promote some silkiness in the face of a pretty dry, big beer.
I don't know about adding any crystal, either. I don't really use much crystal in the first place, but particularly in a beer with over 19lbs of grain it doesn't seem wise.

code:
Boil Size: 7.74 gal
Post Boil Volume: 6.24 gal
Batch Size (fermenter): 5.50 gal  
Estimated OG: 1.089 SG
Estimated Color: 40.5 SRM
Estimated IBU: 35.8 IBUs (Rager)
Brewhouse Efficiency: 70.00 %
Est Mash Efficiency: 76.4 %
Boil Time: 60 Minutes

16 lbs                Pale Malt (2 Row)
12.0 oz               Roasted Barley 
9.0 oz                Black (Patent) Malt
1 lbs 6 oz            Oats, Flaked
1 lbs                 Chocolate Malt, Pale

1.00 oz               Magnum   [7.50 %] - Boil 60.0 min
0.50 oz               Mt. Hood [6.00 %] - Boil 30.0 min        
0.50 oz               Mt. Hood [6.00 %] - Boil 2.0 min         

2.50 oz               Coffee (Secondary 2.0 days)              
3.00 oz               Cocoa Nibs (Primary Post-Ferm 2 weeks)   

Mash 
19lbs 11oz Total Weight

149.0 F for 60m

Ferment 001 at 65f, raise to 68 for 2 weeks, keg

Est. Final Gravity 1.015

Any thoughts? Hops are pretty low, only because the 1 oz of magnum I have is only 7.5 AA. If the homebrew store has some Horizon or Warrior, etc that's 12-14 AA then I think I would up the bitterness to 40 IBU calculated.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


two_beer_bishes posted:

I'm working on NB's bourbon barrel porter kit and I'm ready to get the oak cubes prepped for bourbon-ing. Should I be concerned about making them sterile? Should I boil them first before soaking them in bourbon?

Are you going to soak them in burbon, discard the burbon and then throw them in the beer I assume? Personally I'd want to get them hot for a while.
Oak cubes are Strong As gently caress when you use them the first time. If you want to let them sit longer and get an arguably more developed oakyness, you can throw them in a pyrex cup with enough water to cover them and microwave until the water turns brown. It's the rough equivalent of using them in a couple batches and you can let them age with the beer for quite a while without the oak becoming overwhelming.
It has the added effect of sanitizing them quite well.

I've done a week with fresh unused oak cubes and it drat near ruined the beer with oakyness.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


wafflesnsegways posted:

I've had one batch become infected, and it was a stout with cold-brewed coffee. I don't know for sure, but I think it was the unsanitized coffee that did it. I would definitely soak the coffee in vodka for a day or two first.

Well, I'm planning on throwing ~2oz of freshly coarse ground coffee in, and my dad works for the roaster so I know where it's coming from and what equipment they use, and it'll be fresh out of the roaster into a new bag, etc.

I'm also just throwing the grounds directly into the beer, and a fermented out 9-10% beer shouldn't be overwhelmed too easily by anything that might be on the beans, particularly considering that they'll have hit very high roasting temps the day before. I do plan on sanitizing the grinder, though.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Docjowles posted:

I racked a moderate gravity oatmeal stout onto about 2.5 oz of coarse ground coffee, let sit cold for 2 days then kegged. No infection issues and it tasted great. Only suggestion would be to look at using a light roast. I used the same motor oil french roast I drink for breakfast and it was a little overpowering.

I'm going to use a full city roast kenyan that I really like. It's full out specialty coffee too. Should avoid the gross burnt roasts and the acidity of light coffees.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


j3rkstore posted:

I'm not sure hopsdirect put their crop up for sale yet, i've been watching for a couple of days and their site hasn't changed.

Hopsdirect put their leaf crop up for sale today (the 5th)
http://www.hopsdirect.com/store/domestic-leaf-hops.html

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


ifuckedjesus posted:

They sure did. All the kinds I wanted are already sold out.

Huh.. It doesn't say on the site that they're sold out. Do they email back after ordering and say they're out or am I missing something obvious?

e: or did they just take them off the page. It looks like there's no amarillo or centennial, etc.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Well, I just picked up a pound of magnum (and a friend bought me another pound on his order), a pound of Columbus and pound of Northern Brewer to try and dial in a california common I've been brewing and rebrewing for nearly a year trying to get perfect.

I love whole hops so much.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


bssoil posted:

I just bought 6 gallons of Festabrew wort but unfortunately I bought the continental pilsner without realizing how low of a temperature I will need to brew this properly (not to mention the amount of time required). It came with a saflager s-23. If I were to treat this like an ale, would it turn out badly? Would you recommend I use a different yeast?
THis is only my second brewing attempt so I am not prepared for an overly long and relatively complicated fermentation.

It should come out just fine with an ale yeast. Use Safale 05 or the like. White Labs 001 or Wyeast 1056 if you want to use liquid yeast. These all should work out great.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Has anybody else heard things about never keeping star san under co2? I know I've read it once or twice, but the reasoning that I seem to remember was that co2 neutralizes starsan.

But I've always been under the impression that co2 turns into carbonic acid in solution with water.
It's still always worried me the tiniest little bit so I've never kept star san in a keg.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Yesterday we had a triple brewday. I made a blonde ale and a big stout, and a friend came and did another big stout.


I got all set up and started heating water by 10am, which is a first.


This is after about 7 hours of brewing, and we're on our last batches and I'm in the midst of cleaning my HLT and MLT. The driveway sort of exploded in stainless and plastic.


Nearly time to chill the boil. I use an immersion chiller and recirculate with the pump to get things to hurry up and clear up the wort.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


quote:

P. 149

Oatmeal Cookie Ale
This is a traditional English brown ale enlivened by the addition of toasted oats, and kept from becoming too thick by the use of a little brown sugar. Use the brown ale recipe on p. 92 and substitute 1lb of rolled oats toasted at 300f until they start to smell like cookies for 1lb of the amber malt. Also add 1 lb of dark brown sugar to the kettle.
:snip:
if you like, a tiny dash of vanilla and a teaspoon of cinnamon will extend the cookie illusion. This recipe would be a good base if you wanted to experiment with nut flavors like hazelnut, pecan, toasted coconut or others.



P. 92

Old Nutcase Brown Ale
Yield: 5g
Gravity: 1.067
Yeast: English Ale
Bitterness: 26IBU
Boil: 90 min

All Grain:
8.5 lb 65% Mild Ale Malt
4.0 lb 12% Biscuit/Amber Malt
0.5 lb 4% Brown Ale Malt

Extract+Minimash Recipe:
6.0 lb 67% Amber Dry Extract
2.0 lb 22% Biscuit/Amber Malt
1.0 lb 11% Medium Crystal

Hops:
0.75 oz 90 min Northern Brewer (7% AA)
0.5 oz 20 min Northdown (6.5% AA)

Mash or extract brews: mash with 1 quart of water per pound of malt at 157 F for 45 minutes, then raise immediately to 170f by heating or adding boiling water to stop conversion. Carbonation should be light, or serve as a real draught ale.

I've made this twice and actually really liked it. It's mostly just a brown ale with a really nice biscuity toasty character and an awesome head. A really light hand with some spices would probably go really really well.

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at Oct 11, 2011 around 16:01

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


I Love Topanga posted:

That's a great looking stand Hypnolobster. I'm at the point where I want to start building a brew stand and have looked at the Brewtus. What are the dimensions of yours? Is there anything you wish you would have done differently? added, not added? Do you still have the schematics?

These questions area really for everyone who has built or owns a stand.

Thanks.

I designed this off of a bare necessities, double pump 3 burner sort of idea. I've got an e-RIMS tube and a control panel I've been building, but I'll be making a new stand out of stainless that's a little bit bigger in all directions and with different supports. Don't know when I'll actually do that though, because so far I absolutely love brewing on this setup.

Here are my sketchup plans:
http://i.imgur.com/deeAz.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/FIpnH.jpg
and a really horrible never kept up with build thread on HBT
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f51/nev...d-build-236871/

These are my sketchup files. One is the 2D plans, the other is a 3D plan that shows the 3 parts of the stand and how they go together (top and a bottom and then the uprights are inset), and the last is a cutlist to make it out of two sticks of 1.5" 16 gauge box tube.

http://www.mediafire.com/?8j536saj94k6a1f 2D
http://www.mediafire.com/?qddrv2dj5zf9nam 3D
http://www.mediafire.com/?tnmxrwgwfbx893u Cutlist

Next time I'd most likely use larger wheels (which I still plan to do on this stand when I get around to it. Probably 6" semi-hard wheels or a little larger) and mount them out from the stand instead of inset. I want a little more stability on the off chance that I move it around when it's got pots on it. I'd make it about 3" taller between the top and bottom frame, too. I want more height between my pump and the outlets on my pot. Everybody keeps the pump too close and they don't get the wonderful nearly self priming action that march pumps can do.

e: and if you build it out of mild steel, you really really should spend the extra money and have the thing ceramic coated. High temp paint universally sucks.

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at Oct 11, 2011 around 22:38

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Anybody here done something like an american dark wheat? I've been thinking about a Lil Sumpin Sumpin sort of hopped dark wheat.

Maybe pilsner and wheat and some dark wheat (mostly I want to play with dark wheat, I've never used it before) and a double decoction because decoctions are fun.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Bruinator posted:

I'm getting ready to build one of these and my supports look very similar to yours. Do you find any lack of kettle stability with the simple square keg supports? I'm trying to figure out the best solution that will support the pots so I don't knock them off, provide good breathing to the burners, and keep the branding iron frame temperatures to a minimum. What are your thoughts on kettle supports for v.2?

I like them. They're really nice and stable. Next time I'll probably use something that looks a little neater like some solid square bar stock or a rolled loop of round stock, but in terms of stability I couldn't be happier.
Mine are radisused roughly to the shape of my 16.5" diameter kegs and leaned back a few degrees.


As for heat, unfortunately the only thing I think that could help keep the frame from becoming a giant pile of leg-scorching steel is to make an angle iron or similar frame that's held up off the frame with 4 studs. I thought a lot about doing that, but decided it would be too much work and wouldn't look as clean. As it sits right now, the heat only soaks down about 8 inches from the top of the stand. The top, obviously, will vaporize any liquid on contact.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


I'm jealous. My keg situation is a major bottleneck for me. I can brew a really really significant amount of beer in a day and I still only have 4 kegs and 2 faucets (and a fridge that can hold about 10 kegs..).

My biggest problem is that goddamned Perlick faucets are insanely expensive, and I refuse to use the cheap chrome faucets because of all the horror stories of chrome flaking off and gross buildup inside.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


ifuckedjesus posted:

I don't think it will work well. I bet the metal holds up... you could put a grate over it for better support - but I don't think it will heat enough.

My pot is SS while yours is aluminum so I'm sure there will be some difference, but I used my dads turkey burner (10psi reg) and I couldn't even get it to boil... and it was normal spot on the burner. I think you will need a 20 or even 30psi regulator on your burner to get your 20 gallon pot with even 10 gallons to a boil.

This depends entirely on the type of burner. Jet burners can handle a whole shitload of pressure and just get hotter, most normal banjo burners will just blow themselves out with higher pressure.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


rage-saq posted:

So I'm making a starter for a brewday this weekend and I pull out my smallest flask that will fit 3.5L worth.
I set it on the stove and kind of just take in the size of this thing and think I might have some kind of problem....

my stove is too small...

So, you're saying that you don't have a stirring hotplate?
-1 Jamilpoints


Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Docjowles posted:

I borrowed a friend's plate chiller today and am now highly envious of it. There's nothing wrong with my immersion chiller other than the fact that it takes like 45 minutes to chill down near pitching temps. With the plate chiller it was maybe ten minutes from kettle of boiling liquid to 65 degree wort in my carboy. poo poo is magic. It's kind of far down my gadget wish list just because like I said my current chiller works, but its convenience factor is impressive.

I'm a little nervous about infection since people say they're hard to clean and sanitize, but it seemed pretty pristine so I'll RDWHAHB on this one.

45 minutes immersion chilling and a plate chiller knocks it down to ~10 minutes?

Your immersion chiller must suck something fierce, or you have the flow really low/etc. I knock down to about 65 degrees with a 50' immersion chiller and just recirculating with a pump in about 10-15 depending on the weather. 45 would be horrifying.


Eventually I'm going to have money to buy a plate chiller when the one I want isn't perpetually on backorder. I want to recirculate through a plate chiller back into the kettle while the IC is in.

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at Oct 24, 2011 around 06:42

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Acceptableloss posted:

From like eight pages ago:


So I've got 5 gal of preservative free apple cider and most everything I need for this, but I don't think I have a pound of dextrose. I was thinking I might use a pound of brown sugar or a mix of brown sugar and honey or something and just boil it a little to make sure it's sanitized.

Opinions on what that might do to the flavor? I'd prefer it to finish pretty clean, and I definitely don't want any maple syrup type flavor.

You could boil some water and then dissolve the brown sugar in it if you want. As long as it's above 180 after it's mixed in I wouldn't worry at all.

As said, honey you can just warm up in the jar in some water to get it runny. I wouldn't worry much at all about sanitizing it.
I don't use honey very often, but I'd think the best way to get it to dissolve properly would be to dump the first gallon or so of cider into the carboy, add the warmed honey/sugar/etc and swirl the hell out of it until it dissolves, then carry on adding the rest.


I doubt it would be terribly obvious in the flavor. If anything came through, I think I'd prefer the honey type flavors over brown sugar.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Retemnav posted:

I thought carboys were "better" for some reason? I have a five gallon bucket with a spigot that I bottle from. One problem I've had with it is that once I get above 4 gallons or so, the seal around the spigot begins to leak a little. I guess they make fermenting buckets without the spigot, though?

Honestly, I hadn't thought about it because I normally hear about carboys.

Carboys have the advantage of not having the enormous surface area for infections to drop in, and that's essentially it.

Better Bottles don't really have any disadvantages at all. Just don't use a carboy brush to avoid scratching them up and life is good. I've dropped a carboy before and almost destroyed my foot, so gently caress glass.

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Jo3sh posted:

As rage-saq pointed out, a roughly 50:50 mix of OxyClean Free and TSP (the new phosphate-free kind) is basically PBW. I've been using that in my bucket fermenters and they've never been cleaner. A good scoop of powder and a fill with hot water, then leave alone for a day or more, then dump and rinse.

I've been doing this for about the past year and it's awesome. I still keep around a 1lb tub of PBW that I tell myself is for extremely important hard to clean things, but to date I only have really used it for every few month harder cleanings of my plate chiller.

TSP, Oxyclean Free and Oxalic Acid are pretty much the only cleaners I ever need, and they're all dirt cheap and hilariously effective. I love it.


e: related chemicals tip: For people using StarSan, BUY DISPOSABLE PIPETTES. 3ml or 6ml pipettes let you mix 1 gallon of starsan in moments. 1 gallon needs 5.9ml of star san and you don't have to mix the basically required for accuracy 2.5 gallons/.5oz anymore. I've had a bunch of sterile pipettes for a while but always just used them for taking refractometer samples during brewday. This is a way cooler use.

Hypnolobster fucked around with this message at Nov 10, 2011 around 17:13

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Darth Goku Jr posted:

This makes so much sense that I'm angry at myself for having to have been told it. Thanks.

I went through my first container of StarSan pretty quickly compared to most people because I'm obsessive about sanitation. About halfway through my second bottle I finally got off my rear end and calculated how much I actually need for small quantities and since then, the amount hasn't moved despite doing ~12 batches and mixing fresh every time.

I can mix half gallons accurately too and split it between my spray bottles

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


So, I did this blonde ale a little while ago on a triple brewday between two stouts.

I racked it into a keg after 2 weeks fermenting at 65 (and a slow rise to 69 after 3 days), it sat for a few days and then I pitched gelatin and went on vacation. Finished out at 1.011

I got back a few days ago and I'm in love with the stuff. It turned out exactly how I'd intended. Nice clear straw color, light, mildly floral aroma with a bit of malt. Taste is light malt, not husky at all and a bit of hop bitterness. It absolutely vanishes off the palate as soon as you swallow.
The intention was to make something I can keep on tap and just doodle with the recipe when I rebrew. Mostly so I have a homebrew that anybody can drink and enjoy during parties, etc.
It'd be fun to throw a giant charge of an american hop at flameout and see what it does.

5.5 preboil, 76% mash eff

10lbs 2 Row
8oz Crystal 20

mashed at 152, 168 mashout, sparged to 7.4g preboil

1oz Willamette @ 60
.25oz Willamette @ 30

fresh 001 into a 1.5l starter, decanted and pitched, fermented at 65, rise to 69 after 3 days, held for 2 weeks and kegged. 500 mils/50g of gelatin added to clarify.

1.048 SG
23 IBU calculated
~5% abv

Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


Docjowles posted:

On a homebrew scale it probably makes sense to just get a couple ounces of oak cubes, soak in bourbon for a while and then add that to your secondary. A standard barrel is frigging 55 gallons, and you want it full to avoid massive oxidation and the barrel drying out and leaking. Good luck filling one yourself

I've heard you can buy smaller barrels made specifically for homebrewers, but that because of the higher surface area:volume ratio the beer ends up INCREDIBLY oaky.

Small barrels (and big barrels for that matter) are also usually really really expensive.

It'd be a lot of fun to get 3 or 5 or whatever homebrewers together and do a 6 batch day so you can age in a full barrel. Lots of larger homebrew clubs do that.

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Hypnolobster
Apr 12, 2007

What this sausage party needs is a big dollop of ketchup! Too bad I didn't make any.


I just keep having awesome luck. A friend of a friend just gave me 3 full size sanke kegs



I'm up to 7 kegs now. It's pretty silly.

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