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indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

ScaerCroe posted:

When do the bulk hops coming in again? My hops plant was destroyed by nasty bugs, so I don't know when to gauge harvest time. I need at least 2 pounds from HopsDirect for the year.

October 5th on the HopsDirect website


e: can you just recycle old bucket fermenters? I have a grip that I'm ready to put out to pasture

indigi fucked around with this message at Sep 20, 2011 around 02:03

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indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

That's a good idea. You're not allowed to start panicking until 72 hours have passed with no activity.


What are some tips and tricks anyone has for nice, malty brown ales? Anything you have to suggest would be appreciated - grains, mash procedure, hop schedules, etc. I did this as a fairly simple base for my cherry pie ale but I'm not sure how well it'd stand on its own

code:
8lbs   Maris Otter
1lbs   Flaked Oats
.5lbs  Brown Malt
.5lbs  Biscuit Malt
.25lbs Pale Chocolate

60 minutes at 154*, OG 1.048, bittering hops only at ~25 IBUs, Nottingham

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

I've noticed shipping time's increased at Brewmaster's Warehouse lately as well, which is a shame as I used to be able to place and order Tuesday night/Wednesday morning and have it show up bright and early on Saturday for me to use. But their prices are already the cheapest on practically everything before the 10% discount code (BNARMY), and with 6.99 flat rate shipping I just try to order things I need a week in advance. If I need something sooner than "next weekend" I just pick it up locally.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

Troegs' Nugget Nectar?

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

I think late-hopping has a lot to do with it. I love, love, love the taste and smell of hops, but I'm not a big fan of insanely bitter IPAs. That said if I make an IPA that is 70-80 IBUs of all 20 minute or less addition hops I feel like it goes down way smoother and is very enjoyable.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

Eek. I used almost that same fermentation temperature schedule with my pitch of that yeast, although I pitched at 65* and kept it at 68* until it had been active for 36 hours. I hope it turns out ok

TenjouUtena posted:

How do you avoid building up a ton of DMS in your beer when you do this? I thought the entire point of quickly cooling wort was to avoid DMS?

That's a part of the point. I'm not sure anyone 100% knows what they're talking about when it comes to some aspects of brewing. It can really make your brain hurt.

My understanding is that a long (90+ minute) rolling boil will volatilize enough of the DMS that could be created that letting the beer sit hot, while not ideal cause you can't boil off everything, won't give you a DMS problem.

Getting the right base malt is a big first step cause 6-row and lower-grade malts will have more SMM (a DMS precursor) than a high quality 2-row pale malt. Pale and Vienna will have less SMM than pilsner malt due to higher kilning temp, so if you're going no-chill keep that in mind. That said I'm sure people have had success brewing no-chill and not worrying about any of this. Berliner Weisse is traditionally made with pilsner malt and often not even boiled and doesn't have rampant DMS issues.

indigi fucked around with this message at Sep 23, 2011 around 00:35

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

Help Me With Head Retention

Two of my last few brews have very, very subpar head retention. The bubbles are big and pop quickly and there is absolutely no retention at all - it's like soda, except it dissipates more quickly, I think. It doesn't even leave a tiny ring around the edge. What could cause this? Some sort of process flaw, infection, or ? I'm at a loss. I know it isn't soap because I've done multiple trials with only hand + warm water washing and it doesn't help, and my other homebrews I pour into glasses I've run through the dishwasher retain at the very least a ring around the edge and some lacing.

One was the Scottish 70 shilling that was oxidized and the other was my graham cracker porter. I would think it could possibly be the fat content from the graham crackers, but the 70 behaves exactly the same (I've done a side by side comparison). I'm waiting on the results from my next two brews before I panic, but the fact that two have the exact same issue is a bit scary. The porter does have a bit of the weird wine-y taste associated with oxidation but I put that down to acetaldehyde due to it being pretty green - oxidation can't happen within 6 weeks, can it?


e: oh also if I measure out my strike water for Saturday tonight and keep it in a plastic Home Depot bucket, nothing horrible can happen, right?

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

Jo3sh posted:

Also, no issue in measuring water ahead. I'm a trifle concerned about the orange Homer bucket, but even that I think is a pretty small risk.

This is what was worrying me too. I know the buckets are #2 HDPE but was a bit worried about the dye. I don't know if I'd ferment in them because of that, but I've been storing grain in them for about 8 months and it all seems fine. Thanks for the input on my other problem, too - maybe I'll just boil the poo poo out of my batches tomorrow.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

God, I need to get to work on my brewstand. I've been vacillating between just getting another standalone burner or building something like Wallace and I'm pretty much decided on the latter, it just has a much bigger initial investment. I'm doing a double brew day tomorrow and it'd be so, so much easier if I could have two kettles going at the same time instead of waiting an hour or so to mash-in my second batch.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

Can't go wrong with an ESB!

10lbs Maris Otter or Golden Promise
.75-1lbs of a mix of lighter and darker crystal, whatever tickles your fancy. I'm brewing one today and going with 6oz each of C40 and C120, I like mine a bit darker and more caramelly
I like a bit of biscuit malt in my bitters, ~.5lbs, but that's optional
You could also add some wheat for texture and head, that's not an uncommon ingredient
Mash at 152-154* for an hour.

Couple of ounces of EKG @ first wort to get 25-30IBUs, then some @15 and @5. Depending on how much hoppiness you want, could be anywhere from .25oz-1oz at each of the last two.

Nottingham, WLP002, WLP023, Thames II, basically any English strain should be good. Basically think about what you want from your beer and you can (or we can help you) pick ingredients and processes based on that. If you haven't already, pick up Radical Brewing. It'll teach you how to create a recipe on your own.

indigi fucked around with this message at Sep 24, 2011 around 13:57

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

A lot of grains claim to give a red hue to beer, but the only one I've used that actually gives a nice ruby redness as opposed to a burnt sienna type color is small amounts of roast barley. What say everyone else?

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

Can't go wrong with a noble hopped pale ale

Lrrr posted:


Does this sound ok? I'm not too experienced with various hops yet, so any comments from the pros are welcomed. Also I can only boil about 10l so the gravity when boiling will be drat high, will this have any effect on the hopping? Can I compensate for this somehow?

It'll reduce your utilization by a bunch, which will already be low due to a high OG. I plugged your numbers into beer calculus and you'd wind up with a 1.080 OG and ~17 IBUs. You'd have to up all your hop additions to ~100 grams to get into the realm of IPA bitterness. I'd say drop a kilo of the DME and up your Centennial to 50 grams, then do one more addition of Challenger or Cascade at 10 and you should be good.

indigi fucked around with this message at Sep 24, 2011 around 21:32

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

Lrrr posted:

Thanks for the advice all! I found a better brew calculator (http://beercalculus.hopville.com/recipe) and played around a bit with the variables and adding most of the malts later in the process seems like the way to go (at least if I'm gonna be a cheapskate and not use all my hops.)

I think I'll boil the hops with just 1.5kg of the light LME and add the rest of the LME just before the last hop addition.

With the same hop amounts and boil times Ill be looking at 54.6 IBUs and a OG of 1.054 according to the calculator.

Make sure you kill the heat before adding the late LME to avoid scorching and/or massive boilovers

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

I'm mostly all-grain now, but sometimes I do extract when I only want to spend 2 hours brewing and not having to clean anything but a pot. Those beers turn out just as good (if not better) than my all-grain tries. In fact, my Cascade pale ale might be my best beer ever and that took me about 90 minutes from turning the faucet on to pitching my yeast due to a 20 minute boil.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

$150? For that? Where do you live?

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

big business sloth posted:

Yeah. Let it go for another week then hit it again. It'll be perfectly fine.

Jo3sh posted:

I sense a bidding war just among the denizens of this thread.

gently caress yeah. He could quadruple that price and you'd still save about 200 bucks off any comparable stand I've ever seen. There's no way I'd only pay $150 for it even if that's what he was asking for.

indigi fucked around with this message at Sep 26, 2011 around 16:51

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

Lrrr posted:

Here is the plan so far:

Steep special grains at 70C in 9L of water for 30 min:
750g Crystal 120L
300g American Black Patent
150g Dark Chocolate


You're going to be adding an absolute shitload of unfermentable sugars here. It will probably end up underattenuated and cloyingly sweet. I'd suggest replacing some of the DME with cane sugar added after it's been fermenting for a few days. With high gravity extract brews underattenuation is one of the most common problems.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

tesilential posted:

Speaking of attenuation, how is your 3787 batch coming along? Mine was at 1.017 a week ago and I'm going to check it tonight.

If the gravity is still high I may put it outside (88-92*) to get it to finish low.

I actually checked it last night, and it was at 1.012. I think it's pretty well done but I'm gonna let it sit at ~74* til the weekend. The walls and underside of the lid are absolutely coated in gunk.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

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I'd rather pull a mac on you
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Pillbug

I'd say go with either Special B or the D120 (bump up the C45 a bit if you go syrup) and either roast barley or black malt. Also with everything else going on in this style it's very easy for the roastiness to get subsumed. In my first try I used 12oz of roast barley and it's barely detectable to the point that I upped it to a pound in my latest go, and it's got a wonderful roasty/coffee-like smell.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
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Pillbug

Tedronai66 posted:

I was thinking 1-2 oz nugget for 60, another ounce at 10-15, and an ounce of cascade at 5-10, and an ounce of both for dry hop after 10-14 days in fermenter.
I'd suggest something like

.5-.75oz Nugget @60
1oz Nugget @10
1oz Nugget .5oz Cascade @5
1oz Nugget .5oz Cascade @0

Then let it sit for ~20-30 minutes before chilling. Nugget is typically a high AA hop, I think usually over 10, so assuming that this would put you at around 50-60 IBUs. I might cut back the crystal to .5-.75lbs, but I'm always afraid of over-crystaling an extract batch after a few 1.020 FGs in a row.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

Lrrr posted:

Care to elaborate on this? The DME says 97& attenuation, so replacing parts of that with sugars wouldn't matter that much would it? Wouldn't pretty much all the unfermentable sugars come from the special grains?

Also, how big would the difference in fermentable vs unfermentable sugars be for mashed vs steeped with these grains? I thought the reason why these grains where listed as suitable to use as special grains because there wasn't much enzyme action in them anyway so it didn't matter much if you mashed them or not.

Edit:

Concerning much nonfermentable sugars, maybe a different strain of yest could negate this issue by at least going through every last bit of the fermentables?

I really don't know how DME could get 97% attenuation unless it's a blend of DME and sugar. Malt extract has to contain some unfermentable sugars to replicate the taste and mouthfeel you'd get from barley, and the highest I've ever seen DME rated was 80%. If it is, somehow, 97% attenuable, then you're right that all the unfermentables would comes from the special grains, but I don't know that that's possible. Are you sure it isn't listing 97% extract?

I'm not sure exactly how big the difference would be, but I know that if they were mashed the specialty grains would provide more fermentable sugars. You're right that getting color and flavor from them doesn't require mashing. And if you're using WLP550 you're already going to be getting getting about the highest apparent attenuation beer yeast can give (outside a couple saison strains which might not fit in in a stout).

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

I tasted my ESB today when taking a gravity reading. Pitched late Saturday night, it's down from 1.055 to 1.011. Tastes loving delicious, WLP023 is a phenominal strain. I'd drink a pint of this tonight if it was cold and carbed. Definitely gonna have to harvest a few jars of this stuff and make a ton of English styles this winter with it.

e: also some tasting notes on my Bretted witbier: it's ~3 months old, and if you told me this was fermented with a saison yeast, I'd believe you. Somehow the wit and the Brett combine to produce a spicy phenolic character reminiscent of a saison, and it's dry and crisp on the palate like one as well. Definitely a bit heavier on the fruity esters than a typical saison, which will probably increase with age. It's got a strong Brett aroma but not very much uniquely discernible Brett flavor character. It's pretty drat good. Next time I might let the wit yeast ferment most of the way out then pitch a starter Brett with some extra DME to get the witbier character more pronounced - this time I pitched a 2L starter about 48 hours after active fermentation begun.

indigi fucked around with this message at Sep 29, 2011 around 05:38

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

I try to use 1 pound or less of crystal malts in extract beers. 300g should be enough, Special B is a very strong flavor malt.

Sugar will ferment out 100% and increase the abv without directly adding any flavors, but an increase in abv can have unique and profound effects on flavor and mouthfeel. Alcohol itself is fairly sweet, and in a higher OG wort yeast will produce more fermentation byproducts. When you add the sugar can effect final flavor, too - if you add it to the boil, the higher percentage of simple sugars at the start will lead to more fusel alcohol formation; later, when the environment is more hostile to yeast, you'll get more esters and other stress-induced fermentation byproducts (which isn't always a bad thing with Belgian yeast).

The most important thing is pitching enough yeast and maintaining temperature control, cause there's less margin for error on high gravity brews before your yeast get fed up and ruin the beer.

indigi fucked around with this message at Sep 29, 2011 around 05:47

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
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Pillbug

Kraven Moorhed posted:

Fermentables:
6.6 lb. Dark LME
2 lb. Dark DME
8 oz. Maltodextrin
Specialty Grains:
8 oz. Caramel 60L
8 oz Roasted Barley
8 oz Black Patent

I think your problem is likely the unfermentables you added via 1.5 lbs of steeping grains, the use of dark malt extract (which already contains medium-dark crystal and some roasted malt), then another half pound in the maltodextrin (which is completely unfermentable). Seems like a pretty crazy kit. Dark malt extract is always going to be less fermentable than light extract and is supposed to make up for some roasted/specialty malt in the grain bill; why it'd have you toss all the extra steeping grains in on top of that in those quantities is a bit perplexing. I've learned to always use pilsner/extra light malt extract and make up color/flavor with steeping grains.

You might be stuck, but if you don't mind spending some money you could make a little starter (one quart/liter) with a packet of US-05 or a vial of WLP007, then as soon as you see krausen, immediately dump it into your stout. If you get actively fermenting, healthy yeast in there, they'll likely knock it down a few points, but I kinda doubt it'll get to the recipe's target FG. (Typically an 11 gram packet of yeast will be enough to take on a 1.072 beer, but if it's old or suffered big temperature swings, things could get ugly)

More importantly, taste it! If it tastes good, don't futz around with it. High FGs aren't the worst thing in the world if it's good to drink (if a little thicker/sweeter than intended). Just keep this stuff in mind for next time.

indigi fucked around with this message at Sep 29, 2011 around 08:07

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

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Pillbug

I've started US-05 at 58* internal and it was fine. Once fermentation begins slowing down, wrap a blanket around it and it should be fine.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

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Pillbug

Insulate it somehow and tape it to the side of the fermenter.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
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Pillbug

tesilential posted:

It takes a long time for the wort temp to change and the ambient temp will be MUCH lower in the freezer so when the compressor turns off at 63* the wort continues to cool via the ice cold freezer.

I've never had this problem once my wort was where I wanted it, and didn't know it was something others had to deal with. Seems like a super powerful freezer to continue cooling 5 gallons of liquid in the fridge once the compressor is off. The only time I've had wort cooler than I wanted was when I was cooling it from 80* to 60*, and when I checked it was at 55*.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

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Pillbug

What kind of yeast did they have access to back then? Also the fact that there was hopped extract in the 1920s seems crazy to me. It's been around longer than sliced bread. We should be saying "the greatest thing since hopped malt extract"

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

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Pillbug

That's another thing that irks me about the Yeast book. They talk about never leaving your beer on the cake for 2-3 weeks after fermentation is complete because autolysis flavors will begin to develop. I've left 8% barleywine and an 8-9% triple on the cake for one to two months after reaching terminal gravity and there's not a hint of autolysis in either, and in the case of my triple, not even a year out in bottles. I really think you have to treat your yeast like poo poo, almost deliberately, to get them to start dying off and contributing those off-flavors. Maybe underpitching a batch with a vial that's been in your warm cupboard for a few weeks with no nutrients or aeration and fermenting mid-70s could get you autolysis flavors after half a month, but under normal circumstances, not a chance.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

ifuckedjesus posted:

I saw them on there this morning as I was running out the door to work. Had I realized they were going to go THAT fast I would have ordered some.

Same here. Jesus. I guess I should order some from freshops even though they're so much more expensive

e: actually when you include shipping, the price per oz for Simcoe/Amarillo from freshops is the same as the overpriced hops from my local stores. I might as well give them my business.

indigi fucked around with this message at Oct 5, 2011 around 23:15

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
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Pillbug

Just grab a packet of US-05 or Nottingham and it'll be a tasty ale.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

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I'd rather pull a mac on you
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Pillbug

You could try steeping 4-8oz of flaked barley or wheat if you don't want to go with Carapils. The adjuncts add some extra protein which will help with head retention, and any cloudiness that results won't be out of place for the style.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

Could you talk about why the ProAm version is so different from the others? Specifically, why the drastic reduction in CaraMunich and the loss of Aromatic, Biscuit, and Chocolate altogether, and the alteration of the base malt/syrup %ages/addition of flaked adjuncts? I've always wondered about why there are (have to be?) differences when scaling up a homebrew/1bbl pilot brew batch to a full capacity brew.

indigi fucked around with this message at Oct 6, 2011 around 08:34

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

My lager's been fermenting for 11 days now and it's only dropped about 14 gravity points. I did two 2L stirplate starter steps for this yeast and it looked pretty healthy throughout, I don't know what happened. Something's definitely wrong I warmed up to 58* to give it some help. Maybe I just got a bad... I don't know what. It looked good in the flask. gently caress.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

Docjowles posted:

If it looks, smells and tastes good use that poo poo.

Second. Make sure you taste it - if it tastes or reminds you of the consistency of stale chips, I'd say trash it. Crush up some fresh malt (if you can) to compare. It might smell ok but chew and taste old.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

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I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

If you're using fresh fruit, it's best to think in terms of pounds per gallon. I'd start with at least 1:1 and see how it goes. Also why use a lager yeast when you're going to be fruiting and tannining it up anyway?

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

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I'd rather pull a mac on you
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Pillbug

$30 with Prime shipping is kind of a steal. I'll probably get a couple once I'm back from New York

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
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Pillbug

Docjowles posted:

Beyond that, it's surprisingly bitter and minerally considering I used a Bohemian pilsner recipe. I didn't bother to dilute my tap water and while it's pretty soft, I guess it wasn't soft enough. Assuming the yeast character goes away I'd like to enter it in a competition for feedback (and mad medals, bro). Seems like Dortmunder Export would be my best bet for matching flavor profile to a style?
German Pilsners can be more assertively bitter and more minerally than Bohemian examples, so maybe enter it as that. The BJCP examples for the style list beers in order of how well they conform to the guidelines, and Victory's Prima Pils is first in line for 2A, so judges should be expecting a good bit of hop presence.

indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
I'd rather pull a mac on you
sorry Ms. Jackson, but I'm packin


Pillbug

JohnnySmitch posted:

So does anyone have a good (extract-based - don't have the equipment for all-grain yet) stout recipe I can get my feet wet with?

Basic, and loving awesome, extract dry stout recipe:
6lbs Pilsner LME
1lbs Roast Barley (I prefer English/Belgian as they're more assertive than North American or German varieties)
Optional: .5lbs Flaked Barley
30-40 IBUs of hops
Any English/American/German ale yeast. (I like WLP007, WLP023, Nottingham dry, Wyeast 1450)

Steep the barley in ~140-150* water for 30ish minutes, add the LME, bring to a boil, add your hops, let it rip for 60 mintues. Another addition of hops at ~10 is optional. Top off to about 5.25 gallons.

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indigi
Jul 20, 2004

picture me workin McDonald's!
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Pillbug

tesilential posted:

Edit picture:


I'd be more worried about the legs standing up to the extra weight as well as stability than the edges of the raised portion curling or buckling. As to the flame I suppose you could always get a wok ring if you think the extra headspace will disperse too much heat.

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