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tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Many smells come out of a fermenting airlock amigo. At first I assumed you meant the sharp punch of co2, which adds acidity to an over carbed beer. However thats unlikely as you say the beer is not very carbonated.
Did it have the same off flavor at bottling? What was your fermentation temperature?

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tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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indigi posted:

I think late-hopping has a lot to do with it. I love, love, love the taste and smell of hops, but I'm not a big fan of insanely bitter IPAs. That said if I make an IPA that is 70-80 IBUs of all 20 minute or less addition hops I feel like it goes down way smoother and is very enjoyable.

Do you find the bitterness fades quickly this way? I brewed an IPA With maybe 37 IBU from the 60 mom addition and another 30 from late additions and I found it wasn't bitter enough after 1 month. It kinda went from IPA to pale ale.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Or you could boil a gallon of water and put it in a sanitized milk jug, then freeze it. Cut the jug with sanitized scissors and toss the block of ice into the wort. You can also just buy a gallon of water and freeze it.

Edit: of course you must factor in the additional gallon in your recipe when you calculate your volumes.


VVV If you cover the pot near the end of the boil (to sterilize the lid) it will stay sterile while it cools. When you boil you effectively kill all microrganisms and most spores, they don't spontaneously form in the water.
Tl;dr it will be sterile until microbes are introduced via air or objects.

tesilential fucked around with this message at Sep 23, 2011 around 00:33

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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I have a Belgian beer, a dubbel I suppose, that began life at 1.072 OG. it's 75% pils, 15% dark candy syrup, 5% Munich II, 5% crystal 40. I used wyeast 3787, Westmalle's strain with a 2L starter pitched at 68*.

Fermentation began quickly and was vigorous. Wanting strong esters and interesting flavors, I opted to due a mild version of Westvleteren's schedule which is to pitch at 68* and let it rise on it's own, stopping it as it approaches 82-84*. Having had bad experiences with high fermentation temperatures, I decided to keep it at 68* for 30 hours of vigorous fermentation (huge Krausen), then set the temp to 70 for another 30 hours. After that I raised it to 72* fermentation for 3 days. The gravity during this time was 1.035, halfway done. I raised the temp 2 degrees every 2-3 days then left it at room temp, 78*.

Now, after 2 weeks, my gravity is 1.017 (waaay too high) and my main flavor is fusel alcohol! It's not undrinkable like my first batches, but it definitely has an unpleasant twang to it and the initial taste is rather green. The yeast has flocculated into a huge trub and the beer is crystal clear at room temp in the hydro jar. The beer became cloudy when I chilled the sample for tasting.

What in the hell is going on? After reading brew like a monk a couple times, I expected completely different results from this yeast and method. I know several of you have uses this yeast. What fermentation schedule did you use and what were the results.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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rage-saq posted:

What did you mash at? Any nutrients? The westmalle strain is a big beast and needs nutrients to get a good healthy ferment, but hold on adding any oxygen or it gets too clean. 1.017 is definitely a lot higher than what I would expect from a grist like that unless you mashed at 154 or so.

5 Gal strike water at 159* with 10 lbs of grain (4 gal batch) had me at 149-150*. Some spots could have been a little warmer than others until it was thoroughly mixed. Used whirlfloc and ferm cap in the boil, but no nutrients. The starter itself was just 100% pils malt. The sugar was added with 15 minutes left in the boil.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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big business sloth posted:

Ok cool. My roommate was thinking the yeast would die without adequate sugar for another week or something, but that didn't sound right.

Nope.

Also you should be leaving virtually all your brews in primary for AT LEAST 2 weeks. There are very few brews that are ready to be taken off the yeast in just one week.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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silver97232 posted:

You know I've found this to be more a homebrewer thing than a universal beer thing. If you're brewing a normal gravity ale around 1.050 with an english or american strain it should be package ready in 10 days. It will have reached terminal gravity in 3-4 days, then raise the temperature up about 5 degrees for 3 days to condition, lower to 32 for 2 days so it drops bright and you're done.

My normal fermentation schedule is 68* for 3 days 72* for 3 days then chilled to 32 for 1 or 2 days.

That being said, having a metered amount of oxygen injected, proper pitching rates, and accurate temperature control are imperative. If you don't have those things down then it's going to take longer or be less predictable.

I agree 100%. I have a couple simple recipes that I can keg in 10 days or less. I was mostly saying it because he seems to be new to brewing, and a big newb mistake is taking the beer off the yeast too early. Hell if he takes a gravity reading at day 4 and it's 1.009 and then at day 7 it's still 1.009, then by all means rack to secondary/bottle/keg/whatever. I doubt that's the case here though.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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indigi posted:

You're going to be adding an absolute shitload of unfermentable sugars here. It will probably end up underattenuated and cloyingly sweet. I'd suggest replacing some of the DME with cane sugar added after it's been fermenting for a few days. With high gravity extract brews underattenuation is one of the most common problems.

Speaking of attenuation, how is your 3787 batch coming along? Mine was at 1.017 a week ago and I'm going to check it tonight.

If the gravity is still high I may put it outside (88-92*) to get it to finish low.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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^^^reply to the42ndtourist

That does seem a lot like BIAB, albeit 500x more expensive. Where did you read BIAB is a low efficiency method? I regularly get 80* with a very small sparge.

You probably got good efficiency because you did a full sparge after the full volume mash. Of course you would have to boil got hours to get your gravity where you wanted it.

Quick question, is that thing a kettle, fermenter AND serving vessel? If so how do you plan to simultaneous brews going?

tesilential fucked around with this message at Sep 28, 2011 around 01:29

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Lrrr posted:

You do make a lot of sense. I guess I'll drop the crystal to 300g then. How much of the DME should I exchange for sugar? 1-2kg? And I assume I should only add 80% sugars by weight for the DME I take out to get same abv? Is one vial enough yeast or should I make a starter/ get two vials?

As for temperature excessive heat isn't that big of a problem in Norway.

You probably don't want to go over 20% sugar.

Look 2 posts above you. Too much dark malt is bad. You can brew a stout with 12 oz of roast barely and the rest pale malt. Start with simple recipes or you will never understand what each ingredient contributes to the beer.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Never used pumpkin before, but the heat involved in caramelization will sterilize the product. I wouldn't worry about infection if you handle it carefully.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Paladine_PSoT posted:

Okay, so I just cracked a bottle of my accidental hefeweizen, and it was like a goddamn volcano. I didn't shake it, it just erupted from the carbonation.

I put 2 tsp priming sugar per liter bottle, is this too much or did I bottle too early while it was still in primary?

2 tsp doesn't sound like much for one liter. Good thing you used plastic as glass could have been messy.

What was the gravity when you bottled?


Edit for content:

I brewed SMaTH on Thursday that is a variation of the one I did a few months ago.

single malt, 11 # of Maris Otter

three hops
60 min = 1/2 oz centennial 1/2 oz n. brewer (39 IBU)
10 min = 1/2 oz centennial
5 min = 1 oz cascade (whole)
flameout = 3 ounces of cascade whole hops

The original used cascade with centennial for bittering and was a hit among my friends. I'm experimenting with late hoping on this one as the first had cascade throughout the last 20 mins and this one has a much larger flameout addition. The beer is also overall about 10-15 IBU's higher (depends on how much if any IBUs the 3 oz of cascade contribute at 0 min)

I expect the beer to be full of delicious cascade aroma and crisp with good body and low gravity. The thames valley yeast (1275) really goes well with cascade for some reason. Actually prefer it with american hops than with english hops.

Bought a new thermometer at walmart for $15. It is the oven proof probe type and it gives an instant reading, way better than the $12 digital meat thermos I'd been using before. My new favorite piece of gear. It freed me from holding the thermometer in the wort often while cooling and having to sanitize it each time. This time I tossed it in near the end of the boil and left it there until I hit my pitching temp

Also, opened one of my last Fuller's London Porter clone I brewed in April. It was spot on after primary, then seemed to lose body a week after bottling. Theres a huge thread on HBT about the yeast and bottling, and people saying it wakes up and attenuates further, tasting like an entirely different (usually worse) beer.

Well I took a gravity sample of the porter for the hell of it, and spent several minutes decarbonating it in my hydrometer jar. I was surprised to note it was now at 1.014 when it had been at 1.018 at bottling time! I left it in primary for a while this yeast flocculates as well as any so I believe it must have gotten agitated and woken back up to consume more sugars.

I'm now hoping to use this discovery to save my belgian dubbel (with 3787, westmalle yeast). I brewed this 3 weeks ago and it's stuck at 1.016. The yeast flocculated like a brick after a week, and now I'm tempted to rouse it (with a sanitized coat hanger) and get it into suspension to see if it won't drop a few more points (1.008 would be nice).

tesilential fucked around with this message at Oct 1, 2011 around 05:25

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Everyone overcomplicates using a temperature controller.

First and most importantly, make sure you have a thermosticker on every carboy and bucket you have. This will give you a very accurate reading of the temperature of your wort (within 1-2* at worst) and is more accurate than taping a probe to the fermentation vessel. Next chose your fermentation temperature. A good one for many ales is 64*f. This is the temp we want the actual wort to be during fermentation.

Set your TC to 60* with a 4*f differential. This keeps the wort temp at a constant 64* on my setup. Confirm this with your thermosticker.

The issue with taping the probe to the bucket/carboy and setting to 64* is that the wort temp needs to rise above your target temp for the compressor to turn on. If you set to 63* with 1* differential then you negate this, but now the compressor turns on and cools the wort back down to 63* (sometimes lower) before turning off. It takes a long time for the wort temp to change and the ambient temp will be MUCH lower in the freezer so when the compressor turns off at 63* the wort continues to cool via the ice cold freezer. It could go significantly lower than you want it to.

It's also nice to not have to worry about the probe when I'm moving buckets and carboys around. I sneak mine in near one of the lid hinges and keep it along the backside and out of the way.

tesilential fucked around with this message at Oct 2, 2011 around 20:57

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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I'd mash lower than 155-156* for a DIPA. The fact that its mostly extract will keep your FG high as it is, you need all the digestability you can get for the yeast.

IMO pretty much all big beers (1.07+) get mashed 147-149*. Maybe an RIS I'd go to 152*.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Daedalus Esquire posted:

So I'm finally switching the BIAB since I have a large enough kettle. Based on the next time I'm going to be able to brew, I'd like to do a holiday beer as it will probably be ready just before Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Does anyone have BIAB recipies for a good winter/holiday beer. I'm thinking some kind of spiced ale.

I ferment in my basement which is pretty consistantly between 52* and 58* during the Fall and early Winter, so I'd prefer a beer that is generally fermented on the colder end. I suppose I could even lager at those temps...

I don't know, any suggestions? and any recipes?

BIAB is just an easy all grain method, so you don't need to look up specific BIAB recipes, any All Grain recipe will work fine.

If I may make a suggestion, run your grains through the mill twice (double crush) at the LHBS or wherever you get your grains. I always double crush and get from 75-85% efficiency, depending on the size of the grist. Last brew I did a single crush for the hell of it and ended up at 59% efficiency with simple 11 lb maris otter grist.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Josh Wow posted:

Edit: Just dropped $40 on candi syrup I got 2 lbs of D180 and 1 lb of D90 for this quad, and then a pound each of D90 and D45 for some future batches.

Just in case anyone is on a budget out there, you can make 5 pounds of candy syrup for $3 if you already have a thermometer, which you all surely do.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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mewse posted:

The guy who runs candisyrup.com has a vested interest in telling you the only "authentic" product is going to come from you paying him money

Definitely. Ironically, last winter the main candi sugar supplier to homebrewers (maybe the guy Rage quoted?) had recipes for how to make their product at home if you were cheap and industrious.

From BLAM there are many type of dark sugar syrup. The Belgians use beet sugar and water and boil it until they reach the desired color and taste profile. Sucrose (cane and beet sugar) breaks down into glucose and fructose. If you exceed 290*f both the glucose and fructose caramelize and are no longer sugars. This means the yeast can't digest them. Westvletren is suspected to use caramelized syrup in addition to dark candy sugar to get that burnt taste.

In America, suppliers use some acid as a catalyst to breakdown sucrose into it's two parts faster.

Candy sugar is definitely a serious business, but it's one of the first things a dessert chef learns to make.

E: VVV drat you!VVV

tesilential fucked around with this message at Oct 7, 2011 around 15:10

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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I haven't ever seen this question asked, and I know it's 100% opinion but I still would like some suggestions of having a diverse lineup of styles on tap.

I've currently got a quad that's getting bottled and a SMaSH casade/MO for the keg.

I need 3 more brews to keg plus another couple to ferment as backups.

I'd like to brew a dark malty brew like a porter or stout.

After that I'm kinda lost as to what else to brew so I can have a nice lineup for guests.

I have the following yeasts:
1275, 3711, 1968, 2308

I'll probably end up doing an IPA last (so it'll be freshest) since every likes those. What else should I brew?

What do you all have on tap now?

This all kinda started because last time around I had 4 pale beers on tap and it was kinda boring, I want to have a good variety this time.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Thanks for the replies I've gotta go through yours again Josh.

Don't like barleywine so I'll probably skip that one though . Tetron, thanks but I'm looking for styles rather than recipes. Trying to find a good balance.

Darth Goku Jr posted:

You sort of allude to this being an event, instead of just having whatever ready whenever. Am I reading too much into it?

Depending on the crowd, you'd probably want to favor session style beers (kolsch, any bitter/pale ale, dry stout, brown ale, various hybrids) and maybe one or two funkier ones (your quad, dipa, rauchbier, spiced).

It's not an event but I will be having people over semi regularly and want a good variety of brews.

Last time I had a full lineup it was ESB (kinda boring), IPA (great), Helles (meh), saison (edit: really good).

Maybe I'll brew a bigger oatmeal stout have something heavy.

tesilential fucked around with this message at Oct 10, 2011 around 22:01

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Prefect Six posted:

So I ordered 2 pounds of grains for my extract wheat porter. Turns out, 2 pounds of grain is a pretty good amount for a cheesecloth bag. Was thinking of doing something along the lines of a BIAB. I've got some paint strainer bags so is the process to just dump them in, raise the temp to 150 and let it sit for 50 minutes or so then pull the grain out?

Use https://www.rackers.org/calcs.shtml to calculate your strike temp.

Basically heat the water by itself to around 160 (this depends on your target mash temp) and then turn off the heat and add the grains in paint strainer bag and stir well. You may or may not have to apply low heat to hold your mash temp. What I do is heat the water, pour it into a fermenting bucket and add my grains. Then I cover with a lid and wrap with a bed comforter and leave it alone. If I had a bigger pot I would mash in the pot on the stove and keep the heat on 2-3 (out of 10) checking the temp to make sure it didn't get too hot.

Once the mash is done (60+ minutes or check for conversion with iodine, it can be done much sooner) remove the grains and let the bag drip. I add 1 gal cold water to the grain bag to my empty kettle and kind of do a mini-spare. Afterwards I squeeze the grains to get as much wort as I can. My beer doesn't have tannins or whatever and most of them are crystal clear.

May I suggest you double crush the grains (run through the mill twice). I usually do with ~85% efficiency, but just crushed once last week and had ~60% efficiency.


EDIT: My bad I thought you were doing an all grain BIAB.

If you are just steeping grains then let it get to 155* or whatever and toss the grains in and go have a beer.

tesilential fucked around with this message at Oct 11, 2011 around 02:13

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Jo3sh posted:

My current tap list is:
Strong red after Lagunitas' Hairy Eyeball
fortified cider
All-Sorachi Ace IPA

In bottles, I have some dark Belgian quad.

In fermenters is a Dusseldorf alt.


High on my list of probable upcoming batches:
Oatmeal stout
Winter warmer (brown and spiced)
Barleywine
Munich/Saaz SMASH

For you, I'd suggest doing something big pretty soon so that it has time to age a bit for the holidays - a barleywine maybe. Next, something dark like an export stout or robust porter. Maybe a Kolsch for holiday drinking by those who want homebrew but aren't into bitter or dark beers. IPA last so it will be fresh.


A strong red sounds delicious and interesting! I hadn't ever considered brewing something like that.

I'll probably try that and an oatmeal, cream or milk stout. I personally don't like much bitterness in my stouts and none in porters. Stouts I like balanced, with some bitterness from the roasted barley to be present. I love chocolate malt in porters.

edit: I forgot to ask, how is the All-Sorachi Ace IPA? I've never tried those hops and only seen them in an all-sorachi saison at the beer store.

tesilential fucked around with this message at Oct 11, 2011 around 06:26

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Morbid Florist posted:

Well the things you learn...

You know what else can drive up your original gravity?
Not adding your last gallon of water to your fermenter

It's only been 4 days, so yesterday I added it during the transfer to my secondary for dry hopping. Anyone have ideas about how this might go?

It reached final gravity in 4 days?

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Morbid Florist posted:

I've tried out one stage but I have to say I find the taste a little bit cleaner/lighter doing the transfer. There's probably some beers I'll like better without the move. But last time I did it all single stage the fucker blew out on me, got beer mung everywhere and ended up dragging back all the crap that gets stuck on the upper parts of a carboy. It didn't turn out BAD but it wasn't as good.

The explosion was yeast fermenting the beer. When you transfer too early (like you are doing) you are leaving a lot (most) of the yeast in primary and your fermentation becomes much weaker. Your beers are probably not attenuating as far as they should.

Most of us only transfer to secondary when we're adding something to the beer, I.e. dry hops, fruit, finings.

Next time let it sit in primary for 2 weeks before you rack to secondary, then dry hop.

Keep in mind brewing kit instructions are written for alcoholics who want beer ASAP and don't much care how good it is. Take your time and do it right!

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Jo3sh posted:

If you want to continue to do concentrated boils, a 20-quart pot is a very effective size. If you are interested in doing full-volume boils or all-grain brewing, you will need a larger pot - probably something in the range of 28-32 quarts. It's worth pointing out that if you brew at full volume, boiling on the kitchen stove and chilling in the kitchen sink become somewhat problematic, so you'll also want to be aware of other potential expenses such as propane burners and wort chillers.

Next you are buying ingredients or visiting your local shop, also ask about Fermcap-S. This is a milky liquid you can add to the boil (about 1 to 2 drops per gallon) that will break the surface tension of the foam in the pot, greatly reducing the risk of boilovers.

Listen to Jos3h.

I brew 5 gal all grain batches with minimal equipment. I use a 23 qt pressure cooker, a small 4 quart pot and a fermentation bucket.

I mash in the bucket (holds an extra gallon compared to PC) and boil in the pressure cooker on my weak apartment and now town home electric stoves.

It takes about 30 minutes to heat strike water and 45 minutes to get a boil going with the airtight pressure cooker lid on. This is a locking weighted lid, MUCH tighter seal then any pot and lid or brew kettle and it still takes a substantial amount of time.

I honestly don't think I could boil 5 gal of water indoors without the pressure cookers

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Lord_Xar posted:

Looking at brewing up my 3rd ever batch this weekend and wanted to do something a little different. I haven't gotten to all-grain yet, but extract w/ specilty grains is right up my alley. I wanted to brew an india red ale (ira) and was wondering if anyone had a good recipe for this. I've checked online and other than one from Double Mountain Brewery in Hood River, OR, I haven't found much. I haven't really gotten into making my own recipes yet, but would love to learn how. There any good sites to read up on this?

I'm also brewing one of these soon.

If you want basically a red IPA you can just add 2 oz of roasted barley to any IPA recipe to get some red color.

Maybe 1 # crystal 60, 2 oz roasted barley, plus extract.

Jos3h posted a recipe a page or two back that has more crystal of you want a sweeter beer.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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I'm not familiar with that yeast but that's good attenuation. What temp did you mash at?

All of my brews see 78* for a week or three after primary and I haven't noticed especially high attenuation.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Hey rage saq and other brewers of Belgian styles, how do you carbonate your brews?

I have a dubbel (1.072 --> 1.015) that I need to carbonate. I had planned on bottling this batch but now I've found I don't have enough proper Belgian bottles and I'm worried about bottle bombs if I use regular Sam Adams type bottles.

I'd like to carbonate to at least 3.5 volumes as per style guidelines.

Should I keg and put it under 17 psi or so and then bottle from the keg in a few weeks? I'm not in a hurry to drink it but I need the fermenting space. I'd also rather not buy empty bottles.

How do you all carb your Belgians?

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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rage-saq posted:

Micromatic supremacy++

Thought taprite was the pimpin

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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So I may be upgrading from a 5.5 gal pressure cooker to a 20 gallon stock pot today. Woohoo, headspace here I come!

I had originally planned on getting a cheap turkey fryer kit but I might be able to get the aluminum 80qt pot for $40. Now I'm kinda lost on which burner to buy. Ideally it would be cheap and powerful (<$40 if possible) and readily available.

Is the bayou turkey fryer kit still my best bet? Someone is selling one with a 36qt pot and empty tank for $45. I can always resell the 36qt or use it for something else.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Propane brewers I need your help!

I bought a 80qt aluminum pot (eaglewear) and am looking for a burner.

I found the following burner with tank and extra 9 gal pot for an excellent price ($35). My concern is that my 80qt pot is far wider than the one in the picture. Will I be okay if the big pot rests on the metal meant to hold the original pot in? The big pot definitely won't fit into that spot but it's flat buttoned so I could lay it on top. Will it heat fine? Will the raised metal hold up?

Thanks!

Edit picture:

tesilential fucked around with this message at Oct 20, 2011 around 18:54

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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ifuckedjesus posted:

I don't think it will work well. I bet the metal holds up... you could put a grate over it for better support - but I don't think it will heat enough.

My pot is SS while yours is aluminum so I'm sure there will be some difference, but I used my dads turkey burner (10psi reg) and I couldn't even get it to boil... and it was normal spot on the burner. I think you will need a 20 or even 30psi regulator on your burner to get your 20 gallon pot with even 10 gallons to a boil.

Too late I bought it from the dude for $35, which is just $5 more than an empty tank cost.

It looks like it will easily hold a couple hundred pounds, but I'm worried that the burner itself has a smaller diameter than I expected.

I will be trying it out in a couple weeks and if it sucks I'll sell it and just get a cheap burner.

Thanks to indigi, jos3h and hypnolobster for your replies as well.

I'm honestly not sure how easily or efficiently this will heat up 6 gal of water with the burner being as narrow as is and the pot being as wide as it is.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Why not throw the 15,10,5 additions all in at 1 or flameout? Supposedly better aroma and taste that that way.

I have a SMaSH MO/cascade that just had a 60 min (39 IBU) and 0 min (3 oz) additions with a planned 2 oz dry hop. Tasted clean and bitter at kegging, will try in a week or so.

I brewed a 1.085 RIS mashed around 148 so it will probably dry out a bit more than I wanted. Was going to pitch 2 packets of US05 but at the last second I realized I could just pitch 75% of a 1968 yeast cake from my Fuller's London Porter clone instead. Saved me having to rehydrate us05 and wash the 1968. I did want to keep reusing the 1968, but heard you shouldn't from high gravity beers so I top cropped with a mason jar. Thing is once the bubbles died down there's not much 1968 in the jar so I will probably have to make a starter .

I usually dont bother with starters as I honestly haven't noticed a big difference. Hell on my SMaSH brew I pitched 5 month old washed yeast from the fridge and got same final gravity (1.01) as I did with a 2L starter and fresh packet the first time around.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Jo3sh posted:

6) Fill the airlock with plain water to the line (about halfway up).

I've never made anything but beer, but i put Star San solution in the airlock.

Arcturas-
To get liquid in your S-shaped airlock, you can just dunk it in liquid and shake. It will fill up. Or if you have a spray bottle you can shoot it in through the top.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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So I brewed a smaller imperial stout on Thursday. Simple recipe:
15 # rahr 2-row
1 # briess crystal 80
1 # crisp chocolate
.75 # crisp roasted barley
.5 # crisp crystal 60

2 oz magnum (15.2%) @ 90
.5 oz hallertau mf (4.2%) @ 15

OG: 1.084
IBU: ~60


Well I pitched the cake from a 1.06 OG porter that was 2 weeks old into this wort at 12am 10/21/11. 10 hours later it had already clogged the airlock, so I loosened the bucket lid so it was just laying on the top and replaced the airlock with some sanitized aluminum foil to cover the hole.

After 24 hours the Krausen subsided some so I put the airlock back on. This morning I noticed it was not bubbling regularly, which was surprising since it is fermenting at 62*

Well I let it raise up to 66* with no bubbling so I took a gravity reading and was shocked to see it was 1.022! Less than 2 days using a low attenuating and highly flocculant strain (Fuller's) at low temps in a stout! It tasted sweet and there is was yeast in the sample so I think it may even drop a little more.

I am thinking about adding a couple pounds of sugar to boost the ABV a bit, any thoughts?

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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Darth Goku Jr posted:

not really even coming close to an answer since i'm brewing my first ever stout of any kind next week, but to mutilate the phrase: if 1.084 to 1.022 is smaller i don't want to be big. otohI know B.O.R.I.S., a well received oatmeal RIS, (the B is bodacious) has a FG of 1.036 (holy poo poo) so I guess there is room for growth

what's your end game in adding sugar? is it just alcohol you want or the warmness or the hotnesss or really i think at ~8.1% abv doesn't beg for a bunch of extra opportunities to introduce something unwanted for the sake of those qualities.

lastly, what is rahr two row and does 'crisp' actually mean anything?


The alcohol would be for warmth ad also to have a more potent drink. I am going to gift some of these for Christmas and want it to be more like 9.5-10% like most RIS.

I haven't tried Boris but CCG makes some pretty sweet stouts, and I'm sure they finish pretty high. They get 72% attenuation and use a sickening amount of special grains. Like 20%+ roasted grains and almost as much crystal malts in their ~10% Marshal Zuhkov.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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j3rkstore posted:

My only experience is with ales so far and I was wondering if anyone could tell me if it is unnecessary to rack a lager to secondary?

I've read that you should rack it to secondary when the krausen starts to fall and before lagering but I'm fermenting in an opaque bucket. It also seems like a lot of .

My intended fermentation schedule is 7 days at 54*, 7 days at 66*, and 28 days at 42*.

Honestly, I don't think there is ever a time when a secondary is absolutely required. I'd certainly want to keep it on the yeast during the diacetyl rest or temp raise.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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TenjouUtena posted:

So, This is my first year brewing, and my basement is starting to maintain a nice 60* instead of the nice 68* it seemed to be holding at during the late summer and early fall. I'll still doing ales for the foreseeable future. My question is, should I be worried about trying to rig something up to warm my wort/beer as it ferments? I have an electric blanket I could easily wrap around the carboy. How would I prevent it from getting overly heated? Should I just let things ferment longer? I'm not adverse to a longer ferment. I would like to avoid buying something to work around this problem, but if I need too....

60* room temp is great. 68* means the wort is above 70* and can produce bad flavors, depending on the strain.

If the basement stays above 55*, I wouldn't do anything. Bring them upstairs after a week to let them finish up.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

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I use an outdoor wireless digital thermometer I got in the BBQ area of wal mart or $16.

It has a little unit with a metal wrapped wire (BBQ proof) and probe. I just dip the probe in wort and go do my thing. The receiver stays with me and let's me see the temp up to 100ft away. Right now I'm cooking meatballs while sitting on the couch.

I got sick of dropping $10 hand held units in wort and too cheap to buy thermapen at this time.

tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

You're a credit to your community!

Tedronai66 posted:

So, how good is this vacuum sealer? Newegg has them with a coupon for $24 shipped.

Are you able to share the coupon?

I have no experience with this vacuum sealer, but have been waiting for a good deal on one as well.

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tesilential
Nov 22, 2004

You're a credit to your community!

Tedronai66 posted:

It's just in their email flyer from today: EMCJKHC75

Thanks!

To current vacuum seal users, what types of bags are best for storing around 1# of leaf or pellet hops?

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