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HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

Nice choreography, babe. You haven't lost a step. Well then, let's dance!



College Slice

wrong thread

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A Pack of Kobolds
Mar 23, 2007



Asparagus is on sale for $1.99/lb and I'm thinking about pickling some.

overdesigned
Apr 10, 2003

We are compassion...


Lipstick Apathy

I just bought five pounds because Lidl had it for $1/pound. Do it.

TheCog
Jul 30, 2012

I AM ZEPA AND I CLAIM THESE LANDS BY RIGHT OF CONQUEST


So I'm trying to make some pickled garlic, following this guide: https://www.koreanbapsang.com/maneu...pickled-garlic/

We're about six days in and some of my garlic has turned slightly blue. Is this normal? Should I throw it out? I thought maybe it was pieces that had floated above the liquid line, but its not, several pieces that were nowhere near the top are blueish.

It was hard to get good pictures, but here:


coolanimedad
Apr 30, 2007
sup itt

Itís normal.

Invisible Ted
Aug 24, 2011

hhhehehe


I don't know the science but i think that's just a reaction between garlic and some acids. Happens in sauteed greens with garlic too.

Tom Smykowski
Jan 27, 2005

I already told you: I deal with the god damn customers so the engineers don't have to. I have people skills; I am good at dealing with people. Can't you understand that? What the hell is wrong with you people?


Last few batches of fermented garlic I made were 100% blue and all delicious (and stinky as hell).

I'm fermenting hot peppers and pineapple right now and spicy sour salty pineapple is amazing.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Tom Smykowski posted:

I'm fermenting hot peppers and pineapple right now and spicy sour salty pineapple is amazing.

I would like to know more.

PokeJoe
Aug 24, 2004

hail cgatan


Hot Rope Guy

Sometimes I like to put pineapple and peppers in a bottle of tequila and drink it after it sits a few days. It's really good

Tom Smykowski
Jan 27, 2005

I already told you: I deal with the god damn customers so the engineers don't have to. I have people skills; I am good at dealing with people. Can't you understand that? What the hell is wrong with you people?


Out of town, so no pics at the moment. I cut up a few handfuls of green chilis (kinda similar to serranos), cut a medium sized pineapple into chunks, and threw them into a 4% or so salt brine.

I've been doing a lot of chinese style fermenting so I threw in some vinegar, chinese cooking wine, and baijiu (chinese booze). Just a capful or two of each.

After it sat for like a week, I tried a pineapple chunk and it was an awesome mix of like every flavor besides bitter. For the first 3 or 4 days, the ferment smelled like pineapple pizza , too.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

Hubris

Fun Shoe

I made some sweet habanero pickled cucumbers today, rinsed the pot out, and made apricot jam as a follow-up. Thing is, I evidently didn't rinse the pot out thoroughly enough, because the jam has a bit of heat to it. The strange thing is, it works...

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

Nice choreography, babe. You haven't lost a step. Well then, let's dance!



College Slice

I put up some asparagus this week.

Everything here is about two weeks late due to a cold spring. Our apple trees just finished blossoming in the past week. The lilacs are in full bloom and if it weren't for starting my garden plants indoors early, there would be nothing in the garden.

My mother is upset because, with the late growing season start, strawberry growers in the southern part of the state say strawberries won't begin until the middle of June. This means up in the north country we won't see ripe strawberries until it's almost July.

My mother has to have open heart surgery in July, and she is worried she won't be able to make strawberry jam for the grandkids this year. I told her I could make it for her. She didn't seem happy with that, and she will miss making it for them.

overdesigned
Apr 10, 2003

We are compassion...


Lipstick Apathy

2019's blueberry haul is in the jars. Lots of 4oz tasters for eventual multi-flavor holiday gift packs.

Hed
Mar 31, 2004



Fun Shoe

Wow nicely done

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Crossposting from general questions because I just found this thread: Roommate's parents sent him a big bag of fresh cherries, was thinking of stealing them to make a jam/syrup/something like that for having with stuff like pound cake. Never done anything working with heated fruits before, anyone have some tips on where to start?

It's about 6 pounds of fruit, they taste fine but roommate doesn't actually eat cherries and I'm on a diet so as much as I'd love to I can't afford to just stuff my loving face.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



my girlfriend put a bunch of fresh cherries into jars with brandy, sugar and some spices. poo poo is dope I eat them with icecream.

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

That looks cool too. I think I'll try and jam 2/3 of them and then brandy up the rest. Thanks!

Hexigrammus
May 22, 2006

Cheech Wizard stories are clean, wholesome, reflective truths that go great with the marijuana munchies and a blow job.

My favourite (lazy) method: Wash fruit, pit, freeze in a single layer on a cookie sheet. When frozen package in a zip-loc bag and throw it in the freezer. Place a handful of frozen or microwaved cherries on cereal, pancakes, or in a bowl with heavy cream over top (my cholesterol is fine, thanks for asking).

If you want to go the jam route you'll need pectin if you want jam instead of syrup. The University of Georgia National Center for Home Food Preservation has a lot of really good basic information on heating fruit or any other food and putting it in bottles without poisoning yourself.

There's also freezer jams if you don't want to futz with canning jars. I use a variant of this recipe from Ball/Kerr for low sugar jams. I'm pretty sure this recipe is also on the insert found inside packages of Ball low sugar pectin. The raspberry jam it makes is insanely good.

In our local grocery and hardware stores no sugar pectin is found with the canning supplies.

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

Nice choreography, babe. You haven't lost a step. Well then, let's dance!



College Slice

The cool, extremely wet spring and summer we've had so far has delayed everything. Strawberries in Michigan are usually wrapping up about now, but the farm we buy strawberries from just started picking this weekend. It's going to be after the 4th of July before I make strawberry jam this year.

overdesigned
Apr 10, 2003

We are compassion...


Lipstick Apathy

Is there a secret to getting full jars of canned peaches? This is two years in a row where I cram them in there and end up with jars that are half syrup. I've tried raw pack and hot pack and still get the same result.

coolanimedad
Apr 30, 2007
sup itt

I think youíre adding too much liquid while packing. I only do a small amount.

overdesigned
Apr 10, 2003

We are compassion...


Lipstick Apathy

I'll try a couple jars with less--I always add syrup up to about 1/2" headspace and then the peaches always shrink down.

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Went with a super simple babby's first recipe and it worked like a charm, this is so cool

e: poo poo I apparently overlooked that you can overcook jam and it gets stiff, now I'm worried

AnonSpore fucked around with this message at Jul 1, 2019 around 07:25

BrandorKP
Jan 21, 2006

When there were five in the bed and we all rolled over I said nothing, because I would not fall off.

Just fermented some garlic scapes. Had them out in a pint and a half mason jar with an airlock with some serrano peppers and a bit of red pepper flake. Brine still tastes a slightly salty but the pH is down to 3 so I moved them into the fridge. I'll see how they taste in another week. Nevermind, didn't even make it to the end of the post, pretty happy with my first try.

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Okay, my second attempt didn't go as smoothly as the first. How soon do I have to reprocess these? Does reprocessing hurt the quality considering I'm exposing the insides to prolonged heat again?

Carillon
May 9, 2014



Anyone played around with the Noma fermentation cookbook? I love the look of some of their fruit ferments, specifically the lacto-plums and the blueberries, but I'm not sure what to do what to do with them once I finish them.

Scythe
Jan 26, 2004


That cookbook is outlandishly cool. I wonít pretend like Iíve made many of the things in it yet, but it does include ideas for how to use the recipes right after each recipe.

In particular with those fruits I think it just suggests making them into sauces (pureeing/straining or rough chopping and simmering, I think) or serving them with cream/ice cream...

Scythe fucked around with this message at Jul 2, 2019 around 16:09

Carillon
May 9, 2014



Scythe posted:

That cookbook is outlandishly cool. I wonít pretend like Iíve made many of the things in it yet, but it does include ideas for how to use the recipes right after each recipe.

In particular with those fruits I think it just suggests making them into sauces (pureeing/straining or rough chopping and simmering, I think) or serving them with cream/ice cream...

Yeah fair the plums one mainly has here's what to do once you dehydrate them, but your idea about sauces is great. I said gently caress it and got them going so we'll see how they turn out!

Rotten Red Rod
Mar 5, 2002



Grimey Drawer

Oh hay canning/pickling thread! I've just started getting into making my own pickled onions and cucumbers. Refrigerator only at this point, I haven't messed with canning/preserving yet - and don't really feel a need to, I just love making these for an easy ingredient to add to lunch/dinner.

My experience so far is just random Youtube tutorials, but it's been going pretty well. I think I've pretty much perfected my pickled onion recipe - here's what I do (based on this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3z2jTcsL28g ):

Pickled Onions

Brine:
1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
1 cup wager
1.5 teaspoon salt (non-iodized)
1 tablespoon sugar
A dozen or so peppercorns

Chop red onions very thinly, then boil them on the stove in water for 5 minutes (it seems like a lot, but I found just pouring hot water over them didn't soften them up enough). Strain, drain.

Loosely fill jars with onions and fill with as much brine as needed. (If I packed them too tight, very little brine could fit in the jar and they had no taste.)

Viola! This made perfectly pink, super tasty onions, and I'm addicted to them. If anyone has suggestions on improving it, I'm all ears, but I'm pretty happy with it.



Now, that said, I think my cucumber recipe needs some improvement. The taste is good, but doesn't compare to store-bought pickles yet. Here's what I've been doing:

Brine:
1.5 cups apple cider vinegar (should I be using another kind?)
1.5 cups water
2 tablespoons salt
4 garlic cloves (is this too little? I didn't want to overpower the rest of the flavor.)
4 teaspoons dill (should I be using dill weed or dill seed?)
2 teaspoons black peppercorns

I used some large cucumbers as I've had trouble finding the right size as of yet, and just cut them into chunks - I'll try a few different varieties when I can, just have to look around a bit more at local stores/farmers markets. In the meantime, does anyone have a recipe they swear by for cucumbers?

Hexigrammus
May 22, 2006

Cheech Wizard stories are clean, wholesome, reflective truths that go great with the marijuana munchies and a blow job.

Rotten Red Rod posted:

4 teaspoons dill (should I be using dill weed or dill seed?)

Pretty sure that's dried dill foliage. I'm a traditionalist and only use fresh dill in pickles. Not sure how to convert from "grab a handful" to teaspoons.

I think I might try that pickled onion recipe if my garden produces well - just had enough for cooking last year.

Rotten Red Rod
Mar 5, 2002



Grimey Drawer

Yeah, but they don't exactly have that at most supermarkets. I figure I'll have to hit a farmer's market to find any fresh (or grow it myself).

Edit: I was lamenting I couldn't show off the onions since I'm posting from work, but I just remembered I have some in my lunch, so here you go; pickling porn!

Rotten Red Rod fucked around with this message at Jul 5, 2019 around 21:31

Literally A Person
May 17, 2017

. . .


AnonSpore posted:

Okay, my second attempt didn't go as smoothly as the first. How soon do I have to reprocess these? Does reprocessing hurt the quality considering I'm exposing the insides to prolonged heat again?

Reprocessing is fine and they can sit for a about a week in the fridge before you reprocess. Quality wise you shouldn't have to worry since you're really not getting them much above 212F. Make sure you heat the mixture back up before you go to reprocess them. In the future consider using a candy thermometer on jams and jellies and such. It takes out a lot of the guess work for final consistency.

AnonSpore
Jan 19, 2012

Bear Witness

Thanks for the tips. It wasn't the consistency, more that I neglected to wipe the rims of the jars so I thought they didn't seal properly. They did eventually seal though, just took a lot longer, and I'm hoping that was enough to do it.

Literally A Person
May 17, 2017

. . .


AnonSpore posted:

Thanks for the tips. It wasn't the consistency, more that I neglected to wipe the rims of the jars so I thought they didn't seal properly. They did eventually seal though, just took a lot longer, and I'm hoping that was enough to do it.

They can take a while. The consistency thing was just because I noticed in another post you were talking about potentially over cooking your fruit so I figured I'd throw it out there. The thermometer is my dear and special friend.

Hexigrammus
May 22, 2006

Cheech Wizard stories are clean, wholesome, reflective truths that go great with the marijuana munchies and a blow job.

Rotten Red Rod posted:

Yeah, but they don't exactly have that at most supermarkets. I figure I'll have to hit a farmer's market to find any fresh (or grow it myself).

The supermarkets here sell fresh dill, which is good because the drat stuff keeps dying on me. I had some growing in the herb garden but I think the other weeds herbs smothered it. I planted more today so it's ready for the main cucumber harvest but it will probably fail to germinate (again).

Rotten Red Rod posted:

Edit: I was lamenting I couldn't show off the onions since I'm posting from work, but I just remembered I have some in my lunch, so here you go; pickling porn!



That looks delicious! I will definitely try pickling onions this summer, even if I have to buy them.

Rotten Red Rod
Mar 5, 2002



Grimey Drawer

It was delicious! Onions, pickles (also mine) and cream cheese on ham slices. A surprisingly tasty snack - I also put the onions in just about everything else I make (salads, sandwiches, etc).

Crusty Nutsack
Apr 21, 2005



Hexigrammus posted:

Pretty sure that's dried dill foliage. I'm a traditionalist and only use fresh dill in pickles. Not sure how to convert from "grab a handful" to teaspoons.

I think I might try that pickled onion recipe if my garden produces well - just had enough for cooking last year.

No, most pickles use dill seeds. Fronds (dried or fresh) won't hurt anything, of course, but you get much stronger flavor from the seeds. When you buy big bunches of fresh dill from the farmer's markets specifically for pickles, you get the stuff that's already bloomed and gone to seed. Those big dandelion-like tops are what you use for canning, not the delicate fronds.

If you want stronger flavored fridge pickles, then make a more acidic brine (higher ratio of vin to water), more salt, more dill seed, more garlic, etc. For a quart of pickles, I usually use a 1:1 brine mix, 2-3 cloves of garlic that I crack, 1 large dill head (that top part that already flowered), and maybe another teaspoon of dill seed to punch it up.

Fridge pickles also need to sit in the fridge longer than processed pickles in order to get the same flavor, I've found. If you're looking for a straight-up commercial style pickle, you may just prefer processed to fridge pickles.

Hexigrammus
May 22, 2006

Cheech Wizard stories are clean, wholesome, reflective truths that go great with the marijuana munchies and a blow job.

Crusty Nutsack posted:

No, most pickles use dill seeds. Fronds (dried or fresh) won't hurt anything, of course, but you get much stronger flavor from the seeds. When you buy big bunches of fresh dill from the farmer's markets specifically for pickles, you get the stuff that's already bloomed and gone to seed. Those big dandelion-like tops are what you use for canning, not the delicate fronds.

Interesting. That's not what the stores were selling here - I can confirm from yesterday's lunch that the dill in our pickles from last summer is just vegetation, no seed heads.

I'll have to try the seed heads this year for comparison.

Crusty Nutsack
Apr 21, 2005



Hexigrammus posted:

Interesting. That's not what the stores were selling here - I can confirm from yesterday's lunch that the dill in our pickles from last summer is just vegetation, no seed heads.

I'll have to try the seed heads this year for comparison.

Stores really only sell the fronds, in little plastic clamshells with the other herbs, or in small bunches. Because that's what you use in cooking, like if you're making cured salmon or putting it in soup or whatever. I don't believe that it's commercially harvested once it's gone to seed/heads as it's too huge and unruly and poo poo. (I have seen bunches of the heads at the store sold from buckets, but it's clearly locally harvested and towards the end of summer when people put up pickles.)

this is what the big fuckoff bunches of mature dill look like for pickles at the farmers markets: https://i2.wp.com/www.goodforyouglu...68%2C1024&ssl=1

this is what you get at the grocery store for cooking to use like you would basil, parsley, etc.: https://shop.nowrafarmersmarket.com...bunch-6bun.jpeg

You can tell the mature bunches don't really have that much usable fronds. They're leggy with thick stems, unlike the young stuff that's like all usable and soft.

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BrandorKP
Jan 21, 2006

When there were five in the bed and we all rolled over I said nothing, because I would not fall off.

Depends on where you live. For a couple weeks a year they sell the whole plant in some places.

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