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Slanderer
May 6, 2007

i'm not mad,
this is actually funny to me


Soiled Meat

dedian posted:

I'm still learning all this stuff of course but the benefit I've found of not making a mash and instead just rough chopping the peppers is I can just separate the brine when they're done, blend peppers to desired consistency, and then mix the amount of brine back in that I want for taste.

Is there a big difference in the taste of the ferment if you mash vs brine + pepper chunks?

I've been trying these lids out (http://a.co/d/2uo4qeb) which are nice because you get a little pump to suck out the air if you have to remove the lid late into the ferment when your veggies won't be producing so much CO2. I haven't done a whole lot of fermenting with it but they're a whole lot easier to get off than the lids + regular airlocks I had before.

The rough chop makes sense, and I had thought about doing the exact same thing with brine separation. No idea how it affects the final flavor though. I started fermenting several pounds of cayennes last weekend, but I set aside a few pounds that weren't quite ripe yet--maybe I'll try chopping those by hand and seeing how it measures up.

One other thing I started trying is adding a spoonful of the fermented mash I still have in the fridge to the new bottles as a starter. Not sure how much it helps, but it doesn't seem to have hurt anything so far.

I have 6 of those lids too, and i like them. I've have them overflow before, but they're easier to clean than a normal airlock so it's fine.

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Slowpoke!
Feb 12, 2008

ANIME IS FOR ADULTS


I ate at one of those farm to table restaurants and they had a charcuterie board with pickled plums, squash, and some other stuff. It made me want to try my hand at some of that stuff, since even at the nice grocery stores you can really only get pickled cucumbers, beans, peppers, etc. Nothing too fancy. Am I right in assuming that most of the science and warnings about using proper recipes is all about shelf-stability and preservation? Like, if I am pickling something to eat later that day or in a weekís time, and keeping it in the fridge, I am okay to do whatever I want right?

New place I bought has a gas stove so I could crank out a giant pot of boiling water if I had to, but Iíd prefer not (unless I get addicted to canning I guess).

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

Nice choreography, babe. You haven't lost a step. Well then, let's dance.

College Slice

Slowpoke! posted:

I ate at one of those farm to table restaurants and they had a charcuterie board with pickled plums, squash, and some other stuff. It made me want to try my hand at some of that stuff, since even at the nice grocery stores you can really only get pickled cucumbers, beans, peppers, etc. Nothing too fancy. Am I right in assuming that most of the science and warnings about using proper recipes is all about shelf-stability and preservation? Like, if I am pickling something to eat later that day or in a weekís time, and keeping it in the fridge, I am okay to do whatever I want right?

New place I bought has a gas stove so I could crank out a giant pot of boiling water if I had to, but Iíd prefer not (unless I get addicted to canning I guess).

Fridge pickles made with a good recipe are perfectly safe and will last quite a while.

As for canning becoming addicting, my canner is never stored away for any long period of time and I've learned to love shredding cabbage for sauerkraut 25 lbs at a time.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

My fingers are set to vibrate


You can do whatever so long as you store the food in the fridge and eat it in a week or so, yeah. That's just standard food preparation rules, doesn't have anything much to do with pickling or canning. You only need the special rules if you want something to be shelf-stable over the long term.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



I've made 5 batches of fridge pickles over the years (recipes not made for storing safely on an un-refrigerated shelf) and they seem to last many weeks. Never gotten sick. I think they would last even longer except we eat them all...

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

Nice choreography, babe. You haven't lost a step. Well then, let's dance.

College Slice

Ranter posted:

I've made 5 batches of fridge pickles over the years (recipes not made for storing safely on an un-refrigerated shelf) and they seem to last many weeks. Never gotten sick. I think they would last even longer except we eat them all...

The hard part of making fridge pickles is waiting 6 weeks before you can eat them.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Why would you wait that unnecessarily long time?

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

Nice choreography, babe. You haven't lost a step. Well then, let's dance.

College Slice

Because the recipe says so. It's George's recipe he would never tell me wrong.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Try them 1 or 2 weeks in and see if you notice any difference. You won't 'hurt' the rest of the batch trying just a bit, not like they're sealed/canned. Next batch I make I'll try waiting 4+ weeks and report back too.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

My fingers are set to vibrate


I opened one of my jars of boysenberry jam and found this:



That's mold on top, isn't it? I turned a crate of boysenberries into trash.

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

Nice choreography, babe. You haven't lost a step. Well then, let's dance.

College Slice

TooMuchAbstraction posted:

I opened one of my jars of boysenberry jam and found this:



That's mold on top, isn't it? I turned a crate of boysenberries into trash.

I had to toss out a half gallon of fridge pickles my stepmother gave me. I think not enough salt may be the culprit. It happens.

Slanderer
May 6, 2007

i'm not mad,
this is actually funny to me


Soiled Meat

I fermented 3 jars of Iberian cayenne peppers a few weeks ago. For 2, I proceeded as normal with a brined mash, but for the 3rd (made days later when the peppers were a bit old) I tried roughly chopping the peppers instead. The finely chopped peppers, as usual, defied my attempts to keep them submerged, and I got some kahm yeast growth on top (which looks kinda gross and bubbly, but its completely fine). The roughly chopped peppers stayed completely submerged and there isn't any visible yeast on the top of the brine, but the very bottom of the brine is milky and cloudy.

I didn't get a picture this morning, but it looked a lot like this:


Any idea if this is normal? I've never seen this before, but that could be explained by the fact that I'm using roughly chopped peppers (instead of a mash), and I never disturbed or agitated the jar at all during fermentation (with all my other jars, I've always had to open them a couple times to fix the fermentation weights, after which I usually stirred the mash before sealing the jars again).

Hexigrammus
May 22, 2006

Cheech Wizard stories are clean, wholesome, reflective truths that go great with the marijuana munchies and a blow job.

TooMuchAbstraction posted:

I opened one of my jars of boysenberry jam and found this:



That's mold on top, isn't it? I turned a crate of boysenberries into trash.

TBH, I can't tell from the picture. It might just be a bit of solids separating from liquids. OTOH, the cardinal rule of home canning is - If you're not sure DON'T EAT IT!

It's only one jar of the batch, the rest might still be fine. Do you check the seal on each jar before you open it?

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

My fingers are set to vibrate


Hexigrammus posted:

TBH, I can't tell from the picture. It might just be a bit of solids separating from liquids. OTOH, the cardinal rule of home canning is - If you're not sure DON'T EAT IT!

It's only one jar of the batch, the rest might still be fine. Do you check the seal on each jar before you open it?

The picture's not great, yeah, but it sure looks like a little colony of mold. I checked another jar and it had similar. I still have two quart jars I haven't checked yet. The seals were fine as far as I can tell; certainly when they'd cooled after canning, they were strong enough that I could pick up the jar by holding onto the lid.

To be honest, I didn't do a great job of cooking down the jam, so it's still pretty liquidy. Boysenberries have a lot of juice to them. I don't think that would interfere with getting a good seal but it's possible it creates an environment that makes it easier for mold to survive? It also of course is possible that that's more likely to create the appearance of mold on the surface.

rt4
Feb 19, 2008


Grimey Drawer

TooMuchAbstraction posted:

I opened one of my jars of boysenberry jam and found this:



That's mold on top, isn't it? I turned a crate of boysenberries into trash.

Sorry to hear about your poysenberries

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

I don't know anything about pickles but I put sliced cucumbers, carrots, turnips, radishes, onions, (whatever I have on hand) in 50% brine (3.5%) and 50% vinegar, along with flavorings (mustard seed, peppercorns, bay leaf, coriander), in the fridge, and start eating them after 3-4 days. A bit of sugar cuts the acid. Not sure if they are technically pickles but our family likes them more than store bought.

TooMuchAbstraction
Oct 14, 2012

My fingers are set to vibrate


That's basically fridge pickles. Congrats on independently deriving the recipe.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

TooMuchAbstraction posted:

That's basically fridge pickles. Congrats on independently deriving the recipe.

I started with vinegarrette and my daughter loves those the most. Then I tried fermented/brined and we didn't like those. Then I decided to try brine and vinegar to cut down on the acid. My grandma canned pickles so I wasn't sure if pickles made in the fridge were technically pickles or just marinated cucumbers.

SymmetryrtemmyS
Jul 13, 2013



wormil posted:

I started with vinegarrette and my daughter loves those the most. Then I tried fermented/brined and we didn't like those. Then I decided to try brine and vinegar to cut down on the acid. My grandma canned pickles so I wasn't sure if pickles made in the fridge were technically pickles or just marinated cucumbers.

Marinated cucumbers and pickles are one and the same, friend. All are welcome here.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


Thanks to Pool Is Closed for the nukamiso guide. Just got my crock started.



Wet and ready to add the ginger/garlic/kombu/chilies. I did 600 grams of nuka for this. The crock is ripped out of an old 1970s crock pot discovered in a family basement.



I hate my phone's camera so very much, it is garbage.



All buried and ready to sit. Will report in after it starts pickling or fails spectacularly. I still have a fair amount of room in the crock but I don't want it to get so full I can't stir the thing. May add another 300 gram nuka portion to it later, we'll see how my transition into a Japanese grandma goes.



Here's a cat as per the original guide.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


Nuka update. The bed isn't quite working yet, but it's fairly cold in here most of the time so I figure it needs more time. Nothing weird is happening in it anyway, and the carrot I left in overnight went from crispy to bendy and had definitely changed flavor a bit. I think there's progress and it might be decently colonized by next week.

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

You might try moving the crock to a warmer area, like by a radiator or heat vent. Some ferments just donít my take off when cold, but can survive it once the colonies are robust. Definitely donít want your bran to go rancid in the meantime.

Grand Fromage posted:



Here's a cat as per the original guide.

Good, thatís an important part of the process.

After a weirdly difficult search, I also ordered new rice bran and am starting a new nuka bed. I also ordered something special that might not get through customs til the end of January.

Looks as though Bobís Red Mill doesnít do rice bran anymore, which is a bummer. I had to order some from up in Vermont, which also happens to be pricier. Hopefully once my bed is reestablished, I can transition to wheat bran without repeating my previous misadventures. Otherwise, Iíd love to know where others are getting bran now - almost all the online outlets I could find are out of stock or no longer list actual bran. Just oils and capsules.

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


This was where I got my bran. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B...0?ie=UTF8&psc=1

There's definitely stuff going on in there, it doesn't smell or look off at all and the test carrots are changing. The one I had today tasted better than they have so far.

Bees on Wheat
Jul 18, 2007

I've never been happy


Buglord

My nuka went off when things got really hot over the summer and I haven't started a new one yet.

I lucked out and happen to live near a Japantown, so I could get rice bran from the grocery store, Nijiya. They even have premixed rice bran with salt and kombu powder already in it, but the price difference was just silly for something that easy to do myself. Unfortunately, it looks like they only have stores in California and Hawaii, but if you live in one of those states, maybe give them a try?

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

Alas, wrong coast. Also I feel you on heat waves. One killed my last setup because I didnít relocate t to the basement fast enough. (Sometimes no central air is a real pain.)

Grand Fromage
Jan 30, 2006

L-l-look at you bar-bartender, a-a pa-pathetic creature of meat and bone, un-underestimating my l-l-liver's ability to metab-meTABolize t-toxins. How can you p-poison a perfect, immortal alcohOLIC?


What's the too hot temperature range like? I've been in traditional Japanese houses in both summer and winter and they're completely awful with no climate control, so there must be ways to manage it without killing everything.

POOL IS CLOSED
Jul 14, 2011

I'm just exploding with mackerel. This is the aji wo kutta of my discontent.


Pillbug

Grand Fromage posted:

What's the too hot temperature range like? I've been in traditional Japanese houses in both summer and winter and they're completely awful with no climate control, so there must be ways to manage it without killing everything.

Too hot seems to be around 85 F. Cool places are usually around plumbing, the basement/crawlspace, or something like that. I know some folks who just keep it under the kitchen sink (not for me, personally; I got vile cleaners down there). I've found my basement to be the absolute best for storage, but to be honest, I'm a little lazy and forgetful, so I moved it up to the kitchen and that turned out to be a bad idea.

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biggfoo
Sep 12, 2005

My god, it's full of !

I was looking to make some jam or something from a bunch of ume I had left over from making plum wine with. Will the fact they've been sitting in sugar/alcohol effect much with the process other than adjusting sweetness?

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