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skeevy achievements
Feb 25, 2008

by merry exmarx


In the space of an hour I watched this sketch on Portlandia, found out the chick in Portlandia was in Sleater Kinney, and came across this thread in SA. mind=blown etc.

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Plus_Infinity
Apr 12, 2011



I made a batch of kimchi a few days ago and it fermented well but tastes REALLY strongly of garlic and soy sauce, even though I just put in a little. Is there anything I can cut it with to make it edible?

Cory Feldspar
May 14, 2006

birds of a feather flock to vagina

I have been steadily churning out pickles for the last few months.

Onions, carrots, peppers(jalapeno, serrano, poblano, habanero), ginger and of course cucumbers all ready for a hot brine bath!
I pickled a few cucumbers with the peppers and they got incredibly spicy, perfect! Now I am experimenting by pairing cucumbers with different types of peppers, i.e. one jar jalape˝o +cucumber, another habanero+cucumber, etc. These delicious experiments should be ready in a week or two.

Since the spring started, this has spread into jams, specifically strawberry:

I used manuka honey as a sugar replacement in this recipe. Does anyone know if the heating process involved is enough to destroy the beneficial aspects of the honey? Either way, the taste is divine.
Not pictured is my failed attempt at lime preserves. I did not use nearly enough sugar, and probably should have added extra pectin because they did not set at all and were abhorently bitter.

My canning hobby is meshing well with my newfound love of charcuterie (thanks to another thread on this board) in the form of duck rillettes, blended duck breast and duck fat, packed and preserved with more fat on top. Keeps perfectly in any ramekin with a good layer of fat on top to block any light and air from getting in.
Spread of the gods

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

Internaut! posted:

In the space of an hour I watched this sketch on Portlandia, found out the chick in Portlandia was in Sleater Kinney, and came across this thread in SA. mind=blown etc.

Yeah, that's going in the OP. I live in the Pac NW so people taunt me with this video all the time.

Plus_Infinity posted:

Is there anything I can cut it with to make it edible?

You could make a 2nd batch of kimchi and combine the 2, or it could mellow with time. Baring that, use it for fried rice, ketchup or additives like in your bi bim bap. Sometimes a batch is a little strong or a little off. Such is pickle making. Last year my asparagus pickles were so salty I had to re-brine them.

Cory Feldspar posted:

Pickles

Can you please post recipes?


2012 Canning Season has begun!
Coming up soon, asparagus dill pickles, mustard, winter marmalade review and canning cook book reviews!

edit for spelling

Joe Friday fucked around with this message at May 6, 2012 around 04:17

Plus_Infinity
Apr 12, 2011



I made asparagus pickles, rhubarb jam, and corn relish last night (all just 2 jars each). Strawberries in my area get ripe in a week or two and there's a pick your own less than a mile from me, so any good strawberry recipes would be appreciated!

Zoltan
May 12, 2001



I just got a 10 qt. pressure canner and I am starting to do canning. I want to do chili and I have a great recipe. My biggest question about canning is the cooking time before it gets processed. Since meat-based sauces and chilis process for 90 minutes (or more?) would I subtract that from the cooking time? I did some marinara sauce, and after cooking to for 2 hours, I processed it for 20 min under pressure and the sauce seemed to get very dark. Would it not be possible to take all of the raw ingredients, mix them up and let them cook in the jars while it is being processed? This is how Hormel makes their canned chili and beef stew.

Does anyone have a recipe or tips on chili or Bolognese sauce?

WrathofKhan
Jun 4, 2011


Does anyone know about how to process mandarin oranges? I can't find any reliable looking directions, the internet is full of 'poo poo, that didn't work and tasted like rear end' reviews, and vague mentions of how industry uses lye to get all the pith off. I'm not afraid of working with lye, but I'd like specifics before I dive in.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Bought a bunch of strawberries last night.







10 kilos worth, I made half of it into jam last night. I just use ordinary glass cans that I have cleaned and washed real good instead of dedicated jam/pickling cans, it's recycling and feels like it's more enviromentally friendly to me to get multiple uses out of the glass jars. We also use a bit of help with preservatives (sodium benzoate). It'll be kept in a fridge, not freezer.

I am wondering if you ought to process strawberry jam or not, I read that processing is only good for high acidity foodstuffs, and strawberries are the opposite of that. And is it too late to start processing the day after you made it anyway?

Last year I pickled a bunch of jalapenos I grew myself in the same kind of leftover jars, using an oil and vinegar mixture. No preservatives there, just the acidity and I also processed them real good afterwards though. I am on my last can now and they still look, smell and taste fine. No paralysis yet This autumn I will skip the oil though.


EDIT: Pressure cooker only the OP says I see now, hmm don't have one of those! Maybe I am gonna have to put these in the freezer after all.

His Divine Shadow fucked around with this message at Jul 27, 2012 around 07:37

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

His Divine Shadow posted:

Stuff about strawberries

Keep your jam in the fridge and use them first in your jam enjoyment rotation.

Strawberry jam does not have to be pressure canned. It can be water bath canned according to your recipe, which is probably 10 minutes at sea level. Things like raw green beans, sauces with made with meat and dairy, and stock are low acid foods and need the pressure canner. Jams, jellies and pickles with sugar, vinegar or salt as a preservative are usually low pH and water bath canner candidates.

Always process product right after you put it in jars to prevent thermal shock from the cold jars hitting boiling hot water. Now that the jam is set the reheating/cooling process could change the texture and firmness.

Additionally, recycled commercial jars will have a much higher likelihood of breakage with processing. Canning jars are manufactured to take the thermal changes that happen in the canning process (they fail sometimes too). Commercial jars are of unknown manufacturing/origin/composition/quality so they are less likely to be able to take a canning process.

Mr Kapu
Jul 6, 2009


Oh hi thread! Where have you been all my life?

I've been a canning machine so far this season! Late, late spring I canned 15 pints of pickled asparagus (and froze another 40 pounds, that poo poo is my favorite). Michigan had a TERRIBLE strawberry season this year so we missed out on the jam, but I did put up some oranges I got really cheap at the supermarket. They made a great marmalade-y topping for ice cream.

As a matter of fact, I JUST prepared a bunch of baby cucs and onions for pickling tomorrow. I'm trying a 2 day recipe for the first time, I usually just raw pack so I'm interested to see if they come out different. The onions are for a close friend of mine. They're her favorite but she has no room to grown them, so I'm canning a few jars as a gift.

I am a religious home canner. I have probably two dozen quarts of chicken stock in our larder that I make with the carcasses left over from roast chickens. We use happy free range chickens from a local farmer and it's the best stock ever- so rich and flavorful. Another favorite around here is canned salmon chowder. You can't can dairy products, so it's everything but the milk/cream. All you have to do is warm it up and add your dairy and ta-da! Deliciousness.

Next week I should have some pole beans producing and I'm just waiting for a few more beets to round out a full batch of those, too.

WrathofKhan posted:

Does anyone know about how to process mandarin oranges? I can't find any reliable looking directions, the internet is full of 'poo poo, that didn't work and tasted like rear end' reviews, and vague mentions of how industry uses lye to get all the pith off. I'm not afraid of working with lye, but I'd like specifics before I dive in.

I don't know if processing mandarins is different, but when I did oranges in cointreau I just washed the oranges in soapy water then sliced them, leaving on the pith and peel but removing the seeds. Maybe you can do the same with mandarins, just cutting them in half?

aejix
Sep 18, 2007

It's about finding that next group of core players we can win with in the next 6, 8, 10 years. Let's face it, it's hard for 20-, 21-, 22-year-olds to lead an NHL team. Look at the playoffs.

That quote is from fucking 2018. Fuck you Jim


Quick question from someone who's never canned or pickled a thing before but who really wants to make some of those candied jalapenos from earlier in the thread...

I don't have a canner of any type so can I use a big enamel cast iron dutch oven with a whole bunch of smaller/shorter jars instead?

Just have to try and find somewhere in town that sells decent jars as I was originally just going to use washed out ones from the shops but apparently that's not a good idea

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

aejix posted:

Quick question from someone who's never canned or pickled a thing before but who really wants to make some of those candied jalapenos from earlier in the thread...

I don't have a canner of any type so can I use a big enamel cast iron dutch oven with a whole bunch of smaller/shorter jars instead?

Just have to try and find somewhere in town that sells decent jars as I was originally just going to use washed out ones from the shops but apparently that's not a good idea

You don't need a special canner (although it's worth the investment if you plan to can a lot). Any large pot will do, although you should make sure the jars can be covered with at least 1 inch of water at a full boil and the pot can maintain a full boil for extended periods of time. A dutch oven might be a little short for the job, but a stock pot works really well. Just make sure to have some sort of rack or buffer so the jars don't sit directly on the bottom of the pot. Jars that touch the bottom of a pot create hot spots that up the change of breakage. It's also handy to have a food funnel, thongs, a jar grabber and a lid grabber to keep things sanitary.

As an alternative, you can always make the recipe and put them in your recycled jars and just store them in the fridge. If you have the fridge space, you plan to eat everything in 3-6 months and this is a one off project, that might be the way to go rather than invest in canning jars and equipment.

ScaerCroe
Oct 6, 2006
IRRITANT

Has anyone made a Orange Raspberry Marmalade? I was thinking of following this recipe: http://www.foodnetwork.com/, but subbing out 3/4 of a pound of Oranges for Raspberries, and then including some dry pectin. Thoughts/ideas on this?

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Joe Friday posted:

Keep your jam in the fridge and use them first in your jam enjoyment rotation.

Strawberry jam does not have to be pressure canned. It can be water bath canned according to your recipe, which is probably 10 minutes at sea level. Things like raw green beans, sauces with made with meat and dairy, and stock are low acid foods and need the pressure canner. Jams, jellies and pickles with sugar, vinegar or salt as a preservative are usually low pH and water bath canner candidates.

Always process product right after you put it in jars to prevent thermal shock from the cold jars hitting boiling hot water. Now that the jam is set the reheating/cooling process could change the texture and firmness.

Additionally, recycled commercial jars will have a much higher likelihood of breakage with processing. Canning jars are manufactured to take the thermal changes that happen in the canning process (they fail sometimes too). Commercial jars are of unknown manufacturing/origin/composition/quality so they are less likely to be able to take a canning process.

Well I made enough jam here to last me a year or so. I am hoping it'll keep that long in a cold enviroment, I did use preservatives to help it along. I mostly followed my mothers method here and I guess I or my parents haven't died from botulism yet?

Used this stuff, preservatives E202 and E211:
http://www.haugen-gruppen.se/produk...od-melatin.aspx

Going to buy some proper cans and canning lids for when I make my jalapenos and habaneros.

aejix
Sep 18, 2007

It's about finding that next group of core players we can win with in the next 6, 8, 10 years. Let's face it, it's hard for 20-, 21-, 22-year-olds to lead an NHL team. Look at the playoffs.

That quote is from fucking 2018. Fuck you Jim


Joe Friday posted:

You don't need a special canner (although it's worth the investment if you plan to can a lot). Any large pot will do, although you should make sure the jars can be covered with at least 1 inch of water at a full boil and the pot can maintain a full boil for extended periods of time. A dutch oven might be a little short for the job, but a stock pot works really well. Just make sure to have some sort of rack or buffer so the jars don't sit directly on the bottom of the pot. Jars that touch the bottom of a pot create hot spots that up the change of breakage. It's also handy to have a food funnel, thongs, a jar grabber and a lid grabber to keep things sanitary.

As an alternative, you can always make the recipe and put them in your recycled jars and just store them in the fridge. If you have the fridge space, you plan to eat everything in 3-6 months and this is a one off project, that might be the way to go rather than invest in canning jars and equipment.

Thanks heaps for the advice - it will probably be more of a one-off project (although I did start some pickled carrots and daikon radish in the vain hope of having something edible to make some bahn mi with!). I'm ok with having several smaller jars to fit into my dutch oven (it's quite a large one) so I will give that a go and report back later from the hospital give it a try.

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

His Divine Shadow posted:

Well I made enough jam here to last me a year or so. I am hoping it'll keep that long in a cold enviroment, I did use preservatives to help it along. I mostly followed my mothers method here and I guess I or my parents haven't died from botulism yet?

You should be fine. Please post about how the hot peppers go and recipes!

aejix posted:

Thanks heaps for the advice - it will probably be more of a one-off project (although I did start some pickled carrots and daikon radish in the vain hope of having something edible to make some bahn mi with!). I'm ok with having several smaller jars to fit into my dutch oven (it's quite a large one) so I will give that a go and report back later from the hospital give it a try.

Cool, please let us know how it goes. There are small 4 oz jars that I love for sauces and condiments. Those might be a great size for you.

CrackyMcZap
Oct 17, 2004

Do you guys have any idea how much kinetic energy a pound of tannerite has?



Rhubarb preserves from Blue Ribbon Preserves and rosemary jelly from Taste of Home Canning and Preserving issue.

idiotsavant
Jun 4, 2000


Processing question: is it normal to have some of the liquid in the jars boil off or am I overfilling? Just did some Roma tomatoes & lightly stewed nectarines + thyme - they were at somewhere between 1/2 and 1/4 inch headspace and all lost a little liquid

Mr Kapu
Jul 6, 2009


Made a trip to the farmer's market Saturday and came home with lots of goodies. After a full day of processing, I'm pretty happy with the results.



That's six pints of pickles, three pints of pickled hot peppers, two pints of dilly beans, three pints of green beans in water, and a pint and a quart of beets. There was plenty of pickling liquid left over and some cucumber odds and ends, so we did a quart of refrigerator pickles too. I also made four quarts of cucumber basil soup that I'm going to can tomorrow and some pepper-tomato soup that won't last the week.

Finally, we made half a jar of hot chili sauce that went straight into the fridge for bbq later this week.

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

Nice choreography, babe. You haven't lost a step. Well then, let's dance.

College Slice

So far this summer I've made strawberry jam and it all went to a family member who's attending school in Pennsylvania. The next preserving project will be a batch of lacto-fermented vegetable medley containing green beans, cauliflower and red onion rings with plenty of spices added to the brine to give it a nice kick. Also drying Greek Oregano and German Thyme from the herb garden. Michigan had strange weather this spring where we had 80's in March then frosts right up until early June. This means 90% of the fruit crops in the state were destroyed by the frosts. Not much available so far at farmer's markets and when what little we have does come in it will cost a fortune.

Mr Kapu
Jul 6, 2009


Highspeeddub posted:

So far this summer I've made strawberry jam and it all went to a family member who's attending school in Pennsylvania. The next preserving project will be a batch of lacto-fermented vegetable medley containing green beans, cauliflower and red onion rings with plenty of spices added to the brine to give it a nice kick. Also drying Greek Oregano and German Thyme from the herb garden. Michigan had strange weather this spring where we had 80's in March then frosts right up until early June. This means 90% of the fruit crops in the state were destroyed by the frosts. Not much available so far at farmer's markets and when what little we have does come in it will cost a fortune.

Hey Michigan friend! I just bought four pints of blueberries at the farmer's market for -ten bucks- and sort of wanted to cry, but it wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. How is corn in your area? I was hoping to cream corn this year but it doesn't seem like it's going to happen.

Weitz
Jun 16, 2008


Oh boy, this is the thread of my dreams!
Ok, so I moved to NYC last year from San Francisco. I had never realized how spoiled I was by the nearly year-round growing season we have in California, so I had never felt any need to jam things. I had made peach jam my sophomore year of college, and it was a huge, way too sugary waste of money.

Last winter I discovered just how much balls the northeast could be in the winter. Fruit and veggies are a pretty substantial part of my diet, and I'm one of those dirty hippies that hates the concept of fruit thats been flown half ways through the world and tastes like nothing.

Flash forward to now, when I've returned from the field (I'm an entomologist, wheee!) and decided to make something each weekend. So far I've made yogurt (doesn't really count, but heck, it saves money and is easy), yellow plum preserves, peach preserves and peach jelly (made from boiling the skins and other refuse of the preserves). Last night I made sauerkraut.

I don't have any fancy equipment, so a lot of this is experimenting with what you can do with canning jars and a stock pot. My one concession was jar tongs, because after splashing boing water fumbling with regular tongs and a full quart jar, you do.

I'm somewhat worried by the sauerkraut- I couldn't get the ziplock bag with water thing to work because I don't have ziplock bags, nor are the jars wide mouth. I had read online that ye olde folks used to use whole leaves they saved from shredding, and basically used those to create a sort of seal that would keep floaters from surfacing. I did that, but with kale (had already shredded all my cabbage), and it seems to be working, except for some kale floatage. And boy, when you burp the mason jars (to prevent 'splosion), it truly smells like a nasty burp.

In light of my iffyness about the sauerkraut, I was wondering if any one could tell me how checking the ph for safety works? I work in a place with a bunch of labs, so I'm pretty sure I could get my hands on some. My sauerkraut has corn in it, so when mushed, it means the liquid is milky white. I guess that's from the corn juice and sugar? I wonder what will happen

And finally, this weekends preserve session should feature strawberries. I try to can things I wouldn't be able to find at a grocery store, so a recipe that goes beyond just plain strawberry jam would be great. Does any one have a good balsamic strawberry jam? Maybe a strawberry + other fruit marmalade?

Thanks all!

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

Nice choreography, babe. You haven't lost a step. Well then, let's dance.

College Slice

Mr Kapu posted:

Hey Michigan friend! I just bought four pints of blueberries at the farmer's market for -ten bucks- and sort of wanted to cry, but it wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. How is corn in your area? I was hoping to cream corn this year but it doesn't seem like it's going to happen.

Corn seems to be fine if you don't mind paying the premium price for it. The man who sells it every year in front of the local gas station is charging $6 for a dozen. It's Peaches and Cream, which I think is too sweet. All of the bi-color hybrids are too sweet in my opinion.

I make the trip to Leduc's in Paw Paw every year for blueberries and buy 20 lbs to freeze. The berries looked much better than last year's, but they started picking them in late June. I must be getting long in the tooth because I remember when blueberry season started in mid July and ended around mid August.

Mr Kapu
Jul 6, 2009


Highspeeddub posted:

The berries looked much better than last year's

Really? I bought ten pounds in North Muskegon last year that were amazing. This year it seems like the berries are a lot smaller and more tart. I still ate them all before canning any jam

Weitz
Jun 16, 2008


So I tried the hot pack method for some elephant heart pluots I purchased. Boiled for two minutes in the medium sugar syrup (3 cups water to 1 cup sugar), and maybe I boiled it too long or I cut the slices too small, but basically, the fruit fell apart. Now I got some beautiful red juice with bits of pulp in it cooling down on my counter. It isn't beautiful, but do you think it's safe (still processed the pints for 20 minutes, sterilized everything, etc)? I hope so- I figure at worse I have an awesome halloween party snack (it looks awesomely ghoulish) and at best I have something that'll be a good topper for pancakes.

Thoughts?

aejix
Sep 18, 2007

It's about finding that next group of core players we can win with in the next 6, 8, 10 years. Let's face it, it's hard for 20-, 21-, 22-year-olds to lead an NHL team. Look at the playoffs.

That quote is from fucking 2018. Fuck you Jim


Joe Friday posted:

Cool, please let us know how it goes. There are small 4 oz jars that I love for sauces and condiments. Those might be a great size for you.

I made a half batch of the candied jalapenos are they are awesome! I skipped the whole water canning as I was intending on doing a small batch and not needing to keep them preserved/sealed for a considerable amount of time. The jar I used was too big though and all of the jalapenos I cut up only filled about 4/5ths of the jar. I'll go invest in some jars half the size and do the full recipe next time. Maybe even look at properly sealing them in that case.

I'm also going to up the cayenne pepper specified big time as the candied flavour dominates the heat (plus I like my chillis to be pretty hot). One day I might even make a batch of candied habaneros - not really sure how successful that will be as the jalapenos have a terrific flavour by themselves where as habaneros by themselves just taste like bowel blisters.

axolotl farmer
May 17, 2007

I had me a vision
there wasn't any television



Nap Ghost

Weitz posted:


Flash forward to now, when I've returned from the field (I'm an entomologist, wheee!)

'sup fellow entomologist. You should check out the Critterquest thread sometime!

Weitz posted:

In light of my iffyness about the sauerkraut, I was wondering if any one could tell me how checking the ph for safety works? I work in a place with a bunch of labs, so I'm pretty sure I could get my hands on some. My sauerkraut has corn in it, so when mushed, it means the liquid is milky white. I guess that's from the corn juice and sugar? I wonder what will happen



I have made saurkraut, and when it goes bad you will know it. The texture and taste will be terrible. If it's properly sour tasting and tastes good, it's good to eat.

CrackyMcZap
Oct 17, 2004

Do you guys have any idea how much kinetic energy a pound of tannerite has?

Holy crap, crock pot apple butter is stupidly easy to make and pretty drat good. Got a bunch of free apples at work. Half of them are now 11 half-pints of apple butter. Next step, crock pot apple sauce. I really need a food mill so I can quit skinning and coring these things.

Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

CrackyMcZap posted:

Holy crap, crock pot apple butter is stupidly easy to make and pretty drat good. Got a bunch of free apples at work. Half of them are now 11 half-pints of apple butter. Next step, crock pot apple sauce. I really need a food mill so I can quit skinning and coring these things.

What is even better is when you can peaches, take the skins, pits and chopped up and smooshed peaches and put them into the crock pot and cook down with allspice, ginger and nutmeg and the left-over canning sirup to make peach butter. Pull out the pits and run most of it throught the food mill, and if you want to chop a couple of peaches up into small bits, stir them in, and can like that.

Rule .303 fucked around with this message at Aug 17, 2012 around 00:41

MisterOblivious
Mar 17, 2010


CrackyMcZap posted:

Holy crap, crock pot apple butter is stupidly easy to make and pretty drat good. Got a bunch of free apples at work. Half of them are now 11 half-pints of apple butter. Next step, crock pot apple sauce. I really need a food mill so I can quit skinning and coring these things.

I know we're not big on single-task kitchen gadgets here but if you find yourself working with a lot of apples one of those old hand cranked peeler/slicer/corer things is a godsend. It's the kind of thing that'll last drat near forever so call up grandma or hit some garage sales. Amazon has them starting at $13.

Weitz
Jun 16, 2008


Woah! Hey entomologists all over the place! Where do you work?

And a new bizarre mystery that has sent me here-
One of my damson jam jars just "pinged". Heard it all the way from the kitchen and it's a pretty distinct noise. Sure enough, I can now pop/flex the lid in. But testing the seal by holding up jar only by the lid still works. What the hell is going on? Might it be because it was next to the oven and I'm roasting some veggies? Will it "ping" back down?

mystery....

Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

I got tired of making my kitchen into a sauna every year so I bought a propane camp stove and now I do my waterbath canning on the back porch. This year I started doing some prep on the stove. I made chutney when it was 90 out and the house stayed cool for a change.

DekeThornton
Sep 2, 2011

Be friends!


I asked this in the general questions thread, but got no answer, but maybe it was better suited for this thread, so I'll ask one time more.

I'm thinking of trying pickling something for the first time, cumcumbers in this case, and I wonder what safety precautions are needed when using the following pickling liquid:

1 liter of water
1 dl salt
1 dl of ─ttika (24% strength Acetic acid)
2 teaspoons of sugar.

Should be boiled before being poured hot over the cucumbers and spices (dill crowns, horseradish maybe some mustard seeds).

Pyromancer
Apr 29, 2011

This man must look upon the fire, smell of it, warm his hands by it, stare into its heart

DekeThornton posted:

I asked this in the general questions thread, but got no answer, but maybe it was better suited for this thread, so I'll ask one time more.

I'm thinking of trying pickling something for the first time, cumcumbers in this case, and I wonder what safety precautions are needed when using the following pickling liquid:

1 liter of water
1 dl salt
1 dl of ─ttika (24% strength Acetic acid)
2 teaspoons of sugar.

Should be boiled before being poured hot over the cucumbers and spices (dill crowns, horseradish maybe some mustard seeds).

You have both a lot of salt and vinegar, if you plan to eat them right after they're done you can have much less. For lacto-fermented pickles brine could even contain no vinegar at all and it's still work, on other hand pickling in vinegar sometimes uses 6-8% vinegar as brine without adding water. Salt is usually 5-10% in brine, so you also have a lot there. So brine and spices recipes are as creative as it gets, try different things, only start canning once you get one you like.
I personally prefer no vinegar at all and 5% salt in brine, to not get vinegar in the way of the taste of fermented cucumbers and spices. These do need sterilizing about 15 minutes in water bath for canning, although I don't can them usually, just store in fridge and eat.

DekeThornton
Sep 2, 2011

Be friends!


Cheers! Seems pretty safe then.

And it should be a ton of salt and vinegar. Otherwise it wouldn't be traditional Swedish saltgurka (salted cucumber).

Iron Lung
Jul 24, 2007
Life.Iron Lung. Death.

Ran across this recipe today for making some fridge pickles out of swiss chard stems: http://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/2...-fridge-pickles

I don't want to buy a ton of swiss chard, but this looks super easy, so can I sub in some other veggies? I was thinking carrots, cauliflower, radishes, zuchinni, etc since its just a fridge pickle.

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

Nice choreography, babe. You haven't lost a step. Well then, let's dance.

College Slice

CrackyMcZap posted:

Holy crap, crock pot apple butter is stupidly easy to make and pretty drat good. Got a bunch of free apples at work. Half of them are now 11 half-pints of apple butter. Next step, crock pot apple sauce. I really need a food mill so I can quit skinning and coring these things.

I make both in the crock pot and it is indeed the best way to do it. Free apples are the best. Free food is always the best.


Rule .303 posted:

I got tired of making my kitchen into a sauna every year so I bought a propane camp stove and now I do my waterbath canning on the back porch. This year I started doing some prep on the stove. I made chutney when it was 90 out and the house stayed cool for a change.

My dearly departed aunt would have screamed you're doing it wrong. She came from the generation that believed if a breath of air landed on the canning jars during processing they would shatter into a million pieces, so her house was shut up tight as a drum and she suffered in the heat.

HUGE PUBES A PLUS fucked around with this message at Aug 25, 2012 around 14:02

the black husserl
Feb 25, 2005



Iron Lung posted:

Ran across this recipe today for making some fridge pickles out of swiss chard stems: http://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/2...-fridge-pickles

I don't want to buy a ton of swiss chard, but this looks super easy, so can I sub in some other veggies? I was thinking carrots, cauliflower, radishes, zuchinni, etc since its just a fridge pickle.

You can pickle anything, anything. Cut into shapes, hey, lets go.

Weitz
Jun 16, 2008


Highspeeddub posted:

I make both in the crock pot and it is indeed the best way to do it. Free apples are the best. Free food is always the best.


So I went to the farmers market, swindled them into letting me buy a bulk amount of apples (bout ten pounds, which is way more than their usual client gets), and turned it into spicy apple butter (the spicyness mainly comes from the fresh ginger I chopped into it!). Just processed those suckers. I'll take a picture when they are not scaldingly hot. 1 batch, four half-pints and a full pint.

I also bought ten pounds of pears for the same purpose, but they are not quite ripe enough.

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Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

Weitz posted:

So I went to the farmers market, swindled them into letting me buy a bulk amount of apples (bout ten pounds, which is way more than their usual client gets), and turned it into spicy apple butter (the spicyness mainly comes from the fresh ginger I chopped into it!). Just processed those suckers. I'll take a picture when they are not scaldingly hot. 1 batch, four half-pints and a full pint.

I also bought ten pounds of pears for the same purpose, but they are not quite ripe enough.

I've been cheating. I run apples through a steam-juicer to make juice for apple jelly and can-able juice, and then run the rest of the pulp through a food mill, add brown sugar and spices and stir in apple shreds I make with the cheese shredder to make mock-apple butter. It is not as good as cooked down apple butter but it is a way to use up the pulp.

before you go off on me, I can't stand throwing the pulp away, but it is too bland for applesauce and I have over 30 pints already; I have to do something with it besides feed the compost heap.

Where are you? You want some apples?

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