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Bees on Wheat
Jul 18, 2007

I've never been happy


Buglord

Does anyone have any good canning recipes for persimmons? One of my friends has a huge tree in his backyard, but they're not the kind that are good for eating raw. He and his wife don't cook much, so the fruit goes to waste every year. I'd like to put some of it to use, and maybe show them that learning how to cook is a good thing.

Alternately, fig recipes would be awesome. I'm moving into a new house soon, with a decently-sized fig tree, and they're getting ripe right about now.

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Pyromancer
Apr 29, 2011

This man must look upon the fire, smell of it, warm his hands by it, stare into its heart

Mizufusion posted:

Does anyone have any good canning recipes for persimmons? One of my friends has a huge tree in his backyard, but they're not the kind that are good for eating raw. He and his wife don't cook much, so the fruit goes to waste every year. I'd like to put some of it to use, and maybe show them that learning how to cook is a good thing.

Persimmons make nice jam with oranges
1kg persimmons
600g sugar(could be more or less depending on how sweet persimmons are and how sweet you want it)
400g oranges

Remove persimmon skin and seeds, cut into bits, throw in a pot with orange juice, sugar and orange zest(if you want smooth jam blend it), cook for about 20 minutes on medium fire stirring frequently then for 10 more minutes on small fire. Can it immediately afterward, because it'll thicken when it cools down.

Weitz
Jun 16, 2008


Rule .303 posted:

I've been cheating. I run apples through a steam-juicer to make juice for apple jelly and can-able juice, and then run the rest of the pulp through a food mill, add brown sugar and spices and stir in apple shreds I make with the cheese shredder to make mock-apple butter. It is not as good as cooked down apple butter but it is a way to use up the pulp.

before you go off on me, I can't stand throwing the pulp away, but it is too bland for applesauce and I have over 30 pints already; I have to do something with it besides feed the compost heap.

Where are you? You want some apples?

Hmm I wonder if you could use the pulp as an egg replacer- I think a lot of vegan recipes use it in place of eggs, and I imagine since the pulp is pretty bland, it'll be neutral.

I'm in NYC! Haha, if you have a ton of apples, my guess is you have a tree and you're out in the country.

Bees on Wheat
Jul 18, 2007

I've never been happy


Buglord

Pyromancer posted:

Persimmons make nice jam with oranges
1kg persimmons
600g sugar(could be more or less depending on how sweet persimmons are and how sweet you want it)
400g oranges

Remove persimmon skin and seeds, cut into bits, throw in a pot with orange juice, sugar and orange zest(if you want smooth jam blend it), cook for about 20 minutes on medium fire stirring frequently then for 10 more minutes on small fire. Can it immediately afterward, because it'll thicken when it cools down.

Thanks! I saw some recipes that called for frozen orange juice concentrate, and that just seemed silly.

Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

Weitz posted:

Hmm I wonder if you could use the pulp as an egg replacer- I think a lot of vegan recipes use it in place of eggs, and I imagine since the pulp is pretty bland, it'll be neutral.

I'm in NYC! Haha, if you have a ton of apples, my guess is you have a tree and you're out in the country.

My town allows trees and I have a couple of them. Way back when I used to go drive around and ask people with downed fruit if I could clean up their yard for them.

Canned apple pulp can be used as an oil replacement, I've done that. You can also use it strait on latkas or use it as a jam filler in those apple dumplings if you add sugar and spices.

Rule .303 fucked around with this message at Aug 28, 2012 around 18:21

coyo7e
Aug 23, 2007

by zen death robot

My parents called me up last week, asking what I was doing for Labor Day. "Nothing," I replied. Then the conversation meandered into my mom complaining about needing to put up her veggies from her garden, and I seized the opportunity to get some practise (and to stock my pantry with spicy, dill green beans, or "dilly beans" as my family has always called them.)


This is the first batch, after we used them up I picked another few pounds from the garden, we made a new batch of brine, and did it again.




I'm rich, biatch!


(the two cans closest on the right, were questionable, and set aside)

Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

that looks great. I'd try to make dilly beans, but I worked in the local canneries for six years and I can't stand canned green beans or corn. I pressure canned corn 4 years ago and just threw it all away, hadn't tried a single jar.

Pears. Pears are coming ripe now. I canned pears in light syrup and made crock-pot pear butter.

Bees on Wheat
Jul 18, 2007

I've never been happy


Buglord

Just made a batch of fig jam, using this recipe. It's setting up nicely, and it tastes amazing. Hopefully it'll keep well in the freezer, because I'm out of half-pint jars and I'm not sure if we can use all of it before it goes bad if kept in the fridge. Definitely going to make more though, and maybe try the balsamic variation.

coyo7e
Aug 23, 2007

by zen death robot

Rule .303 posted:

that looks great. I'd try to make dilly beans, but I worked in the local canneries for six years and I can't stand canned green beans or corn. I pressure canned corn 4 years ago and just threw it all away, hadn't tried a single jar.

Pears. Pears are coming ripe now. I canned pears in light syrup and made crock-pot pear butter.
Pickled Asparagus?


Also, does anyone have any ideas or have links to devices for cutting stuff like green beans, to a uniform length? I was thinking maybe some sort of sleeve or cylinder to the proper length with a trigger+spring to tighten/loosen, would be freaking sweet to just load them in, pinch it down, chop em off, and drop them into the jar.. We ended up using some shears to trim the tops off the too-tall beans because my mom started getting lazy toward the end about keeping to the marks on the cutting board, and a lot of beans were way too long, and others way too short. A little machine (I'm thinking almost like a flour sifter without the mesh) would rule.

Indentured Servant
Aug 31, 2008


Today was the first time I tried canning anything (made jellies), and I've got a few questions! First, if you sterilize too many jars and lids, can you use the lids at another time? I am assuming not because of the rubber seal. Another thing I'm not too sure on is the water bath. I only have one pot large enough for the jars, so I had to wait until I finished canning. I didn't bother with my one jar of grape jelly because it had been cooling for a few hours and I was afraid of messing it up. Is there a time by which the bath has to be done? And if I didn't do a bath, should I assume a decreased shelf life?

coyo7e
Aug 23, 2007

by zen death robot

If you don't seal jelly, you should just put it into the fridge (or freezer,) it will last quite a while regardless, a few weeks or couple months, certainly. I don't think it'd be prudent to shelve it at room temp, though.

I don't know about the lids but I personally wouldn't try to re-use them, the rubber would probably lose its springiness, and/or accumulate grit and dust which might be harder to remove after you boil it again.

Jars are more of a chore to sterilize, and lids are cheap, so just buy extra of lids, you don't want to use any that are questionable or scratched (especially if they're scratched, it could get rusty and be BAD,) anyway, according to my mother (home canner extraordinaire for 40 years.)

The rings are fine to re-use.

Indentured Servant
Aug 31, 2008


Thanks! The all of the seals seem to be proper, but I'm keeping it all in the fridge. I don't think I did the water bath correctly anyway. I checked the Bernardin website and they say you can reuse heated snap lids. I got a bunch of extra ones, though. It seems kind of iffy.

My apple jelly is set up nicely and everything, but it's extremely red. Like candy apple red. Weird considering I used macintoshs and lobos. It looks so pretty, though .

coyo7e
Aug 23, 2007

by zen death robot

Why are you concerned you didn't do it correctly? Did you hear them pop after you took them out and set the jars aside? Did you not have enough water to cover the jars by an inch or two while they boiled (this is important otherwise it won't seal easily)? Too much/little of a gap inside the jar?

I guess rubber could be boiled and reused, I just guess that I'd personally prefer to throw out a lid I'm questionable on, than waste a jar of sweet goodness. Also I would probably leave the lids there for 6-12 months or more, and they'd end up being lovely anyway.

Indentured Servant
Aug 31, 2008


I didn't do the water bath at the right temperature. I'm pretty sure did it at 180 F instead of 212. I did hear the lids pop, though. I realize I'm probably not going to kill anyone, but I'd rather keep them in the fridge for household use. I made a second batch of jelly yesterday and I was more careful with the temperature. Those I'll be giving away.

Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

Has anyone used the re-usable Tattler lids? they look like the old zinc/ceramic lids. What was your experience?


Indentured Servant, the nice thing about nice tart, sugary jelly is that the stuff that grows on it is quite visible and not something that you would eat by accident: mostly bacteria and molds.

The older canning books, the ones the extension services and USDA tell you to throw out, usually had a section on canning with jelly glasses. There they say to boil the jars, ladle the hot jam into them and invert them for a second to sterilize the lid, no water-bath canning. They also tell you how to use parafin, and in the UK they suggest using brown paper and I have no idea how that works. (If my mom found something growing on the jam she would just scoop the fuzz off, until she found out that the mold myceliea can grow throughout the jar)

In short, if you are concerned about your sterility, or possible contamination, eat it quick (that is what I do with non-sealing jars), leave it in the fridge, or re-process it in a boiling water bath to make sure they seal.

If I have lids that were boiled and didn't use, I put them away and use them later--usually on acid fruit. But I am horribly cheap.

coyo7e
Aug 23, 2007

by zen death robot

Okay I haven't read this thread cover to cover, what's wrong with paraffin? Or am I just misreading? We used to seal jars of jam with a 1/4 inch of paraffin or so before putting lids on them, but that just stopped one day and I never noticed or wondered why, nobody I can think of uses it anymore, although maybe I jsut haven't come across anybody using that method anymore (since I assume it'd be a PITA in any case..)

Also, here's some pics of my mom and grandma canning with me a year ago (I did help, but I insisted on grabbing some pictures as grandma's health is ) that I figured this thread would enjoy, at my family's beach rental (sorry for the angle, I'm pretty tall and everyone else was not at all). Grandpa Jack provided moral support when he wasn't snoring due to the waves. My grandmother doesn't use gloves or tongs to pull jars and lids and rings out of the sterilization bath and I can confirm that poo poo was right off the stove!





Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

My grandmother used to use parafin to seal the jam too, but when I tried I could never get a decent seal and the jam would ooze up the sides around the wax. After one try where I wound up putting the whole run into the fridge (ok, 6 jars but...) I went wholly with dome lids and rings.

I was just starting and I had parafin, I was trying to save money by avoiding buying lids.

What you are talking about is called "kettle canning". It works, but the experts I have talked with don't like it. They say that the chance of contamination or failure to seal is high. On the other hand I believe that commercially canned jams are processed this way, so I don't know.

What were you canning? And that one wide mouthed Kerr lid is pretty old, they don't use those logos any more.

I miss canning with my mom.

Boris Galerkin
Dec 17, 2011



What does jalapeno jam taste like? I love jalapenos but I can't imagine wanting to spread it on toast.

the black husserl
Feb 25, 2005



Boris Galerkin posted:

What does jalapeno jam taste like? I love jalapenos but I can't imagine wanting to spread it on toast.

An incredibly delicious mixture of spicy and sweet? Candied jalapenos and other peppers are very common.

Boris Galerkin
Dec 17, 2011



the black husserl posted:

An incredibly delicious mixture of spicy and sweet? Candied jalapenos and other peppers are very common.

Well yeah, I'm really interested in trying it and will pick some up if I see it in a store someday.

SchrodingersFish
Mar 9, 2012


gaaah I promised myself that I would document my next pickle project in pictures to post here (I read an old canning thread a year or two back where people did that and it was super neat) but I totally forgot until just now.

Today I made quick Thai carrot pickles and canned spiced (sugar, cinnamon and cloves) orange "pickles".

The Thai carrot pickles (with rice wine vinegar, sugar and peppers) came out GREAT and were super easy. They took like 2 hours!

The orange "pickles"... I'm not sure if I did them right. My recipe had me slice the oranges through the peel along the wedge line (so I had single wedges in each slice) but it's really hard to do that. I got the impression from the recipe that they were supposed to be pickled whole slices of orange, but after cooking them (as instructed) for 45 min in water, then 1 hour in syrup, most of the flesh came off and they kind of turned into orange peels with a tiny bit of mushy flesh

They might still turn out ok, they sounded really good, I was testing the recipe out for a possible holiday gift. Maybe I'll post some pictures tomorrow!

Mr Kapu
Jul 6, 2009


There are two bushels of tomatoes in my crisper drawers that have been eyeballing me each time I open the fridge for about two weeks now. At this point I'm just going to throw half into the crock pot and reduce for tomato paste. Later this fall I can use some to make ketchup and bbq sauce. The rest are still firm enough for salsa and stewed tomatoes. I just don't know when I'll find the time!

InternetJunky
May 25, 2002



I have zero experience with canning. Is it possible to can butter chicken sauce (without the chicken)? Whenever tomato prices drop here in Canada I make lots of butter chicken and being able to preserve it via canning would be awesome.

Otto Von Jizzmark
Dec 27, 2004


I have been working on a pickled egg recipe for awhile now and I am having trouble getting some heat into the eggs. I have been using habanero peppers. Last batch I put about 15 cut up peppers, seeds removed, into about a quart of vinegar/water/salt. Half the peppers I boiled in the brine awhile the other half i just blanched. I waited 2 weeks and the eggs had a slight hot flavor but not the heat I want.

Is there a better way to get the eggs some real heat other peppers, methods, etc?

Indentured Servant
Aug 31, 2008


Apparently the highest concentration of capsaicin is in the placenta (the white stuff surrounding the seeds). I assume you've been removing that if you've been removing the seeds? This might also sounds silly but how hot are your peppers? Personally, I find the ones in the local grocery don't cut it in terms of heat.

dalstrs
Mar 11, 2004

At least this way my kill will have some use

Fun Shoe

Otto Von Jizzmark posted:

I have been working on a pickled egg recipe for awhile now and I am having trouble getting some heat into the eggs. I have been using habanero peppers. Last batch I put about 15 cut up peppers, seeds removed, into about a quart of vinegar/water/salt. Half the peppers I boiled in the brine awhile the other half i just blanched. I waited 2 weeks and the eggs had a slight hot flavor but not the heat I want.

Is there a better way to get the eggs some real heat other peppers, methods, etc?

I think the seeds contain a lot of the heat as well. Try a batch just cutting the peppers in half and don't remove anything.

Bird in a Blender
Nov 17, 2005

It's amazing what they can do with computers these days.


I made blueberry jam for the first time a couple weeks ago. Just opened it today and everything set right and tastes good so I'm happy. Only problem is that I have way too much. I have 5 pints of jam, and everything is in a separate pint jar. Next time I make jam I'm going to try and find 8 oz. jars. I'm going to give away most of it as gifts, but it takes a long time to go through a pint of jam, half that size will be better I think, plus I'll have twice as many gifts to give away.

This was my first time making jam, pretty easy just takes a lot of time. I'm going to make something easier than blueberries next time, destemming and crushing took a lot of time.

InternetJunky
May 25, 2002



I bought a pressure canner and made some butter chicken. I have 4 1/2 litre jars and they all seemed to have sealed well. Is it a problem if one of the jars isn't quite as full as the others (2" space at the top)?

Also, it looks like a lot of fruit/vegetables don't need to be pressure canned to preserve them, but is it ok if I do pressure can them? Do I still have to add lemon juice if I do?

Lastly, has anyone canned Indian curries at all?

Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

InternetJunky posted:

I bought a pressure canner and made some butter chicken. I have 4 1/2 litre jars and they all seemed to have sealed well. Is it a problem if one of the jars isn't quite as full as the others (2" space at the top)?

Also, it looks like a lot of fruit/vegetables don't need to be pressure canned to preserve them, but is it ok if I do pressure can them? Do I still have to add lemon juice if I do?

Lastly, has anyone canned Indian curries at all?

I'm glad your butter chicken turned out well. I didn't give a response because all I could have said was something vague and not useful.

Sometimes the level is low in the jar because you get a void in the food that doesn't show up until you pro cess it, sometimes it is because the liquid part boils out of the jar for some reason while processing. I am told that in that case the fats boiling out can affect the seal. I think if the seal itself is fine you should be OK, at worst you may want to eat that jar first, just put it in front. If you are very nervous you can eat it now to make sure the recipe is still tasty even though it was canned.

I've pr ocessed acid fruits and veggies in pressure cookers, and it does OK, some like strawberries will turn out to be grey rags in a lovely strawberry juice, but that happens sometimes even when yo u use a water bath canner. About lemon juice, it is there for three reasons: it slows the oxidation of fruit and keeps it looking fresh so you don't wind up with brown peaches and apples, it improves the flavor of slightly bland fruit that may be under-ripe or overwa te red, and it helps with gelling of pectin. The first two are a personal choice, it is up to you if you want to worry about the looks or the taste, it is like salt, some people must have it and others say "meh", but the pectin one is important. But I wouldn't pressure can jam anyways, there is no real reason. You generally only water bath can it for a short time, and high temperature may inhibit gelling by destroying the pectin.

I am always twitchy about my seals, though. If you pressure can acid fruits, tell me how it worked. I bet you can get a wonderful seal that way.

Rule .303 fucked around with this message at Sep 22, 2012 around 01:57

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Look at my horse; my horse is amazing.

If you're lazy, you can leave the skins on the tomatoes, and just blend really well with a stick blender. Or get a food mill to save time.

We put 14 pints of crushed tomatoes (two canner loads) away a few weeks ago, and each time only took about 2 hours to get them in the canner. After that, you can go and do something else.

Oh, and right now is the season to be making applesauce.

Edit: this was meant to be a reply to Mr Kapu on finding time to can tomatoes -- for some reason the Google search brought up the thread with only his posts.

Lead out in cuffs fucked around with this message at Sep 27, 2012 around 01:15

Lead out in cuffs
Sep 18, 2012

Look at my horse; my horse is amazing.

InternetJunky posted:

Also, it looks like a lot of fruit/vegetables don't need to be pressure canned to preserve them, but is it ok if I do pressure can them? Do I still have to add lemon juice if I do?

The main reason you put lemon juice (or vinegar) in water bath canned foods is that the spores of the bacterium that causes botulism can survive boiling and go on to grow in the food, but they cannot survive high acidity. So the water bath kills pretty much everything else, and the acidity kills the C. botulinum. That's also why for water bath canning you should check that your recipe is from a reputable source (e.g. a canning supplies company or the FDA), who is likely to have actually tested that the pH is low enough.

You do not want to get botulism.

However, since pressure canning kills everything, including botulism, you should be able to can fruits and veg without the acid if you want.

The only things that can survive pressure canning are the toxins of some bacteria (not C. botulinum, though -- its toxin is inactivated by boiling). This is only likely to be a problem if you're canning obviously mouldy food to begin with (not unheard of, though.)

Adult Sword Owner
Jun 19, 2011

u deserve diploma for sublime comedy expertise


I've been getting into this scene recently. I made a batch of fridge pickles which turned out great (I put way too much garlic and it burns like looking at the face of an angel) and now I'm hooked.

This is my latest batch that's ready; it's still fridge because I'm scared of boiling the jars (I might do the 180F for 30 minute method next time).



On the left I have sriracha pickles. Extremly simple, I just used the normal recipe and squirted in a ton of the sauce. I also used white vinegar instead of apple, which I usually use, just to see how it'd turn out. They are fantastic and have a perfect heat. I'll be bringing these into work so I can a) put them on my sandwiches and b) so my roommate doesn't go and eat them all in a day.

On the right I experimented with adding red peppers. Unfortunately I didn't realize afterwards that they're really suited to sweet pickles (so no added sugar in my batch) and as a result they're a little bland.

Adult Sword Owner fucked around with this message at Oct 9, 2012 around 23:52

Bees on Wheat
Jul 18, 2007

I've never been happy


Buglord

Don't be scared of boiling your jars! Canning jars like the ones in your picture are designed for that sort of treatment. Just make sure to follow all the instructions for your recipe, and don't put cold jars in hot water. Also helps to have something under the jars in the pot, like a tea towel or a jar rack.

The pickles look tasty, though!

Indentured Servant
Aug 31, 2008


Just checking here if a sugarless sorrel (aka hibiscus tea, karkadé, bissap, etc) syrup is okay to can via water bath. I found one study that puts the pH of hibiscus tea at 2.5, so it's plenty acidic.

Mmmm Pie
Jun 17, 2007
Me like pie


I tried pickling for the first time this year, these turned out really yummy! Mom had an overabundance of green beans. She's also got tomatoes out the wazoo, so I took a couple of boxes when I went to a salsa making party with a friend (had to leave before the actual canning, but did get 300+ lbs of tomatoes processed and the better part of a 5lb bag of onions cut up). We also made a lot of spaghetti sauce, so yay!

I took some beans to my Grampa, and he said he'd give me one of his 3 pressure canners, so I'm kind of excited to keep going on this.

Adult Sword Owner
Jun 19, 2011

u deserve diploma for sublime comedy expertise


Mizufusion posted:

Don't be scared of boiling your jars! Canning jars like the ones in your picture are designed for that sort of treatment. Just make sure to follow all the instructions for your recipe, and don't put cold jars in hot water. Also helps to have something under the jars in the pot, like a tea towel or a jar rack.

The pickles look tasty, though!

Thanks! They look better when you can actually see them. When they were in the fridge the sraichia jar was layered as pickles, then the spices, then a cloud of red. When I picked it up it all went to hell.


A question for everyone, I'm still not sure if white vinegar or apple is best. Nobody can give me a straight answer on the internet as to the difference and some have even said "there is really no difference," but with my limited experience I don't know if I believe that.

Either way I plan to do some ginger tonight, should be delicious in a week.

Bees on Wheat
Jul 18, 2007

I've never been happy


Buglord

Saint Darwin posted:

A question for everyone, I'm still not sure if white vinegar or apple is best. Nobody can give me a straight answer on the internet as to the difference and some have even said "there is really no difference," but with my limited experience I don't know if I believe that.

I think that depends on whether or not you want everything to taste like apple cider.

Actually, your foods probably won't taste like that, but it does have some flavors that white vinegar won't. I tend to keep several varieties of vinegar around for just that reason. If you only plan to do fridge pickles, it might be worth your while to buy both vinegars and make small batches to see which flavor you like best. White vinegar would probably be best for lighter flavored pickles, and apple cider vinegar tends to be good for heavily spiced pickles.

Adult Sword Owner
Jun 19, 2011

u deserve diploma for sublime comedy expertise


Mizufusion posted:

I think that depends on whether or not you want everything to taste like apple cider.

Actually, your foods probably won't taste like that, but it does have some flavors that white vinegar won't. I tend to keep several varieties of vinegar around for just that reason. If you only plan to do fridge pickles, it might be worth your while to buy both vinegars and make small batches to see which flavor you like best. White vinegar would probably be best for lighter flavored pickles, and apple cider vinegar tends to be good for heavily spiced pickles.

Now that I think about it, the peppers I did at the same time were done with white vinegar and that came out pretty unimpressive, even though I used the usual huge pours of dill, the tons of smashed garlic, and the 3 seconds of peppercorn pours. They were extremely underwhelming, so I guess that was the problem. Guess I'm sticking to apple because it makes my other garlic dill pickles so strong I tear up, which is exactly what I wanted.

Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

I've been busy.

Canning Jam:




Canning other stuff:



For some reason I enjoy canning carrots more than I logically should. They have just a lovely look in the jar.
The pear chutney is wonderful, by the way. I had some left over after canning and added it to some beef and cooked it down in a pressure cooker, and it turned out really tasty.

I decided after continually having to figure out if the jar was full of squash puree or apple sauce I should label everything. Not only does it take a lot of the mystery out of life, it also takes a lot of the mystery out of life.

Rule .303 fucked around with this message at Oct 13, 2012 around 14:38

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HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

very special boy


College Slice

I'm having a torrid love affair with the crock my mother gave me for Christmas. So far I've made 3 incredibly delicious batches of sauerkraut and about to pull the most recent batch out to jar up. My family has been enjoying the fresh sauerkraut and they ask me if I'm making another batch or do I plan to soon.

In the meantime, I started another veggie medley on Tuesday. This is a lacto-fermentation that only takes about a week to finish. I love combinations of veggies like this. The jar contains cauliflower, roasted red peppers, red onion, the last four jalapenos from my garden along with fresh basil, oregano and parsley also from my garden and four cloves of garlic. The brining solution is water, salt, lemon juice and whey extracted from natural plain yogurt.



Shortly I'll be making a trip to our local apple orchard to pick up apples and cider to start my Christmas apple butter marathon.

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