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Adult Sword Owner
Jun 19, 2011

u deserve diploma for sublime comedy expertise


drat, that looks awesome. I just remembered I bought a head of califlower from a local farm just for the purpose of pickling, I better get on that tonight!

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Adult Sword Owner
Jun 19, 2011

u deserve diploma for sublime comedy expertise


Oops I got this done on Friday but forgot to get the photos



On the left, califlower and peppers

On the right, califlower and carrots.


Hells to the yeh?

ThreeFish
Nov 4, 2006

Founder and President of The E/N Log Cabin

Yes, hells to the yeh!

I really want to get some new jelly done. I've only made it once and I sort of cheated by making it entirely of Walmart canned pineapple juice. It was actually good. So this time I want to make something a little better. The problem is I'm on a super tight budget. I need a jelly that needs no special equipment (I don't have a jelly bag or anything like that), is made from something fresh I can get in a tiny town in Kentucky at this time of year, and uses liquid pectin because that's all I have.

I also need written instructions. I have never just been able to wing it in the kitchen department.

Any suggestions? I've not come up with much. I'd need a bag for strawberry. Plus they are really expensive. I was thinking about cantaloupe but that might be really weird with peanut butter.

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

ThreeFish posted:

Jelly excitement.

Most of the traditional jelly fruits are going to be out of season at this time of year and therefor not as good and expensive. Jelly needs a nicely strained juice as a base, so it helps to have a jelly bag, strainer or cheese cloth to get said juice. I know you did prepackaged juice before and wanted to try something different, but juice is a really good way to go, especially if you can get local stuff and don't want to invest in any straining methods.

Right now citrus like lemons, limes, satsumas and oranges are coming into season as well as pomegranates and apples. Cranberries will also be around and discounted now that Thanksgiving is over so that is an option too. You can also make jelly from beer, wine, flower waters and all kinds of other things.

What kind of flavors are you looking for?

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


Seville orange marmalade is one of the most delicious substances man can produce. They're coming too! Sevilles could show up at any moment, though I expect it'll be more like mid-January before they're everywhere.

axolotl farmer
May 17, 2007

I had me a vision
there wasn't any television



Nap Ghost

Agreeing that Seville orange marmalade is amazing. If you get imported UK marmalade, it's most likely made with Seville oranges, and much more bitter than regular orange marmalade.

I made a couple of batches last season, both regular marmalade and English style. English style has no pith at all, and is translucent with strands of peel that look like they are trapped in amber.

The English style was something similar to the recipe in this article.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandst...range-marmalade

Tricerapowerbottom
Jun 16, 2008

WILL MY PONY RECOGNIZE MY VOICE IN HELL


I recently made Mexican pickled carrots and they sucked. Too soft, and I used too much Mexican oregano. Can I make these without the frying that seems to be suggested by every recipe? Can I just fry the jalapenos and onions? Should I brine the carrots beforehand or just put the salt in with the other stuff (peppercorns, bay leaves, and the oregano)?

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

Tricerapowerbottom posted:

I recently made Mexican pickled carrots and they sucked. Too soft, and I used too much Mexican oregano. Can I make these without the frying that seems to be suggested by every recipe? Can I just fry the jalapenos and onions? Should I brine the carrots beforehand or just put the salt in with the other stuff (peppercorns, bay leaves, and the oregano)?

Can you post or link to the recipe you used?

Gegil
Jun 22, 2012

Smoke'em if you Got'em

Any suggestions for a good PH Meter to test Jam/Jellies with? I've seen lots of products online for Aquarium / scientific use but nothing I saw seemed suitable for home kitchen use.

axolotl farmer
May 17, 2007

I had me a vision
there wasn't any television



Nap Ghost

Scientific pH meters are really sensitive and finicky things that needs to be calibrated all the time. They would probably break if you stuck them into melted sugar.

Get some pH strips instead, they're available from Amazon and aren't expensive.

Tricerapowerbottom
Jun 16, 2008

WILL MY PONY RECOGNIZE MY VOICE IN HELL


Joe Friday posted:

Can you post or link to the recipe you used?

Here you go: http://bluebonnetinbeantown.blogspo...ed-carrots.html

Has anyone else tried making this dish? Or Mexican pickled onions (cebollas curtidas)?

Molten Llama
Sep 20, 2006


Gentle goons, do not be me. Don't look at a surplus of oranges and think to yourself, "Yay! Holiday marmalade! It'll be fun!" Even using perhaps the simplest modern recipe I found, marmalade making consumed five hours of my day, as well as four of my fingerprints and the skin on the back of my left thumb.

That is not to say it didn't yield the most delicious marmalade I have ever tasted. It did. But holy mother, what a process. I could have tossed some berries and pectin in a pot and had processed jam before I was even done slicing oranges. On the bright side, so far every jar appears to have sealed properly.

I don't know how that Guardian blogger survived making four batches of the stuff.

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

Tricerapowerbottom posted:

Here you go: http://bluebonnetinbeantown.blogspo...ed-carrots.html

Has anyone else tried making this dish? Or Mexican pickled onions (cebollas curtidas)?

I made a recipe similar to this once. What I would say is to very briefly fry everything, maybe 10 minutes or less for the carrots and 5 for everything else and then put the stuff in the jar and scald it with the brine. Let it cool and refrigerate at least 1 week before trying to eat it. It's likely that the carrots got too done and then the strength of the brine further softened them. Also feel free to scale back the spices to your taste. A first run of a recipe is often a trial and error session. My first pickles I made were kind of terrible.

Amber Sweet
Apr 30, 2009


Just popping in to ask a quick question that I'm hoping someone here will be able to answer...

Anyone know if I can can (using a water bath canner) to preserve something like homemade sriracha? This is the recipe:

1 pounds red jalapeno chiles, stemmed and seeded (see note)
12 garlic cloves, peeled
1 cup water
cup distilled white vinegar
1 cup sugar
3 tablespoons table salt

is the acid content high enough to ensure a safe process?

fine-tune
Mar 31, 2004

If you want to be a EE, bend over and grab your knees...

Amber Sweet posted:

Just popping in to ask a quick question that I'm hoping someone here will be able to answer...

is the acid content high enough to ensure a safe process?

The vinegar by itself has a pH between 2 and 3, so maybe? I know the peppers aren't acidic enough to just can alone. Depending on how quickly you use the sauce, you could probably just make it and refrigerate it (skipping canning altogether). At our house, even though Sriracha is shelf stable, we keep in in the fridge to extend its life. Edit: You can also freeze it in smaller quantities and pop out as needed.

Do you have a university near by at all? If they have an ag program, they'll usually have an extension service available with people who know stuff like this (or have a better knowledge base to work from).

On another topic, what's the opinion on Tattler lids and Weck jars? I know they're not USDA approved (thanks Google searches), but there seems to be a ton of happy anecdotes about them.

fine-tune fucked around with this message at Dec 13, 2012 around 16:44

Amber Sweet
Apr 30, 2009


fine-tune posted:

The vinegar by itself has a pH between 2 and 3, so maybe? I know the peppers aren't acidic enough to just can alone. Depending on how quickly you use the sauce, you could probably just make it and refrigerate it (skipping canning altogether). At our house, even though Sriracha is shelf stable, we keep in in the fridge to extend its life. Edit: You can also freeze it in smaller quantities and pop out as needed.

Do you have a university near by at all? If they have an ag program, they'll usually have an extension service available with people who know stuff like this (or have a better knowledge base to work from).

On another topic, what's the opinion on Tattler lids and Weck jars? I know they're not USDA approved (thanks Google searches), but there seems to be a ton of happy anecdotes about them.

Thanks Canning it isn't a necessity, I'm giving some out as Christmas presents so I wanted it to be able to stay good if they don't get around to opening it for a while, and so I can make it a but further in advance (like now), instead of waiting until a few days before Christmas.

The recipe itself says it will stay good in the fridge by itself for up to a month, so it's not a huge deal if it doesn't can well.

Amber Sweet fucked around with this message at Dec 13, 2012 around 17:30

Molten Llama
Sep 20, 2006


If you're thinking about using Ball's jam recipes, do yourself a favor and use the newer, reduced-sugar versions. After making a bunch of reduced-sugar jam, just thinking about the full-sugar versions is about enough to make me diabetic.

Hell, if you don't have a monstrous sweet tooth, go for sugar-free pectin and use the super-low-sugar recipes. (Although at that point you're stuck watering down the fruit to make up volume, so maybe not.)

Kilersquirrel
Oct 16, 2004
My little sister is awesome and bought me this account.

Amber Sweet posted:

Thanks Canning it isn't a necessity, I'm giving some out as Christmas presents so I wanted it to be able to stay good if they don't get around to opening it for a while, and so I can make it a but further in advance (like now), instead of waiting until a few days before Christmas.

The recipe itself says it will stay good in the fridge by itself for up to a month, so it's not a huge deal if it doesn't can well.

A somewhat unorthodox method to check your pH could be to buy a soil pH tester and use it to check the acidity of your sauce pre-canning. Decent ones are usually accurate to 0.1 and nice ones can be accurate to 0.01 without going into lab equipment price ranges.

Although when in doubt and a recipe involves garlic, pressure can. Or toss in some citric acid to drop pH without adding unwanted flavors.

axolotl farmer
May 17, 2007

I had me a vision
there wasn't any television



Nap Ghost

Necroing this thread because Seville Oranges Are in Season!

This time of year and only this time you can get wonderful Seville oranges in Europe. They look terrible and are pretty much inedible raw, but makes wonderful marmalade.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


I totally already made my first batch of Seville marmalade.

Question though: my peels always rise to the top of the jar while it cools. How did you get yours to be so nicely distributed?

axolotl farmer
May 17, 2007

I had me a vision
there wasn't any television



Nap Ghost

If you look at the pic you can see that the top of the jar is dense with peel.

Bird in a Blender
Nov 17, 2005

It's amazing what they can do with computers these days.


Could you try flipping the jar over every 30 minutes or something for a couple hours? That may ruin the seal though.

TerryLennox
Oct 12, 2009

There is nothing tougher than a tough Mexican, just as there is nothing gentler than a gentle Mexican, nothing more honest than an honest Mexican, and above all nothing sadder than a sad Mexican. -R. Chandler.


I started some dill pickles, pickled onions, pickled mushrooms and some carrots to round it out. Its been about 3 weeks since I closed them. How long should I wait before tasting them? Is there a set time to leave them alone?

Bird in a Blender
Nov 17, 2005

It's amazing what they can do with computers these days.


I usually give it a minimum of two weeks before opening, so you could open one now if you wanted.

physeter
Jan 24, 2006

high five, more dead than alive

I make my own kim chi in an airtight plastic container. When it's fermenting I just let the gas out a little, a couple times a day, so it doesn't explode, and I'm always happy with the results. Is there any reason I can't do that without sauerkraut? Because the idea of skimming mold every two days makes me want to barf. But I really want my own sauerkraut. I realize it might still mold, but if I could minimize that it would be really great.

Adult Sword Owner
Jun 19, 2011

u deserve diploma for sublime comedy expertise


TerryLennox posted:

I started some dill pickles, pickled onions, pickled mushrooms and some carrots to round it out. Its been about 3 weeks since I closed them. How long should I wait before tasting them? Is there a set time to leave them alone?

Wow, I usually can't wait a full week. I haven't found them to really seem any better if I wait longer.


Also I guess I need to make another batch of dills. I bought some pickles a while ago but never got around to using them and now they've gone squishy.

I've been eyeing this recipe since I've been getting into fermented products

http://fakeitfrugal.blogspot.com/20...-half-sour.html

Any thoughts?





Just to throw a third wheel on this post, how necessary is fish sauce in kimchi really? I have a head of cabbage I am going to get going, but for some reason the stuff I make tastes just weird with the fish sauce. Commercial stuff I buy doesn't taste of it but it seems noticeable, even with the small amounts I use. It could be psychosomatic of course.

Adult Sword Owner fucked around with this message at Mar 28, 2013 around 04:52

TerryLennox
Oct 12, 2009

There is nothing tougher than a tough Mexican, just as there is nothing gentler than a gentle Mexican, nothing more honest than an honest Mexican, and above all nothing sadder than a sad Mexican. -R. Chandler.


Wow, that recipe looks tasty. Never tried fermenting. I ended up giving the pickles 3 weeks and they came out just fine, nice amount of crunch and a garlicky taste. I think the trick for getting crunchy pickles is to boil as little as possible. I boiled mine for 1 minute and then covered it with boiling brine. No pops on the lids, even though I am in the tropics.

My pickled onions were meh. I think I boiled them too much and the brine was not acid enough to taste like a cocktail onion. I'll try to skip the boiling step and trust the boiling brine to prevent bacterial infection. The taste is kind of acid and kind of sweet. I think I'll use them in sauces and curry.

No idea about the kimchi, never even tried Korean food. You could try the scientific method. Make two half batches, one with fish sauce and one without. You'll end up eating both of them and figure which one you prefer.

axolotl farmer
May 17, 2007

I had me a vision
there wasn't any television



Nap Ghost

physeter posted:

I make my own kim chi in an airtight plastic container. When it's fermenting I just let the gas out a little, a couple times a day, so it doesn't explode, and I'm always happy with the results. Is there any reason I can't do that without sauerkraut? Because the idea of skimming mold every two days makes me want to barf. But I really want my own sauerkraut. I realize it might still mold, but if I could minimize that it would be really great.

I have only once had a batch of sauerkraut go bad, and that was most likely because there wasn't enough salt in it.

Sauerkraut will bubble up, and you can just remove the foam with a spoon. If you're making kimchi, you're pretty much making sauerkraut anyway.

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

very special boy


College Slice

If these are refrigerator pickles they need a minimum of 6 weeks before they're ready. When cucumbers in my garden are ready for pickling my rule is don't open them before Halloween.

Adult Sword Owner
Jun 19, 2011

u deserve diploma for sublime comedy expertise


Highspeeddub posted:

If these are refrigerator pickles they need a minimum of 6 weeks before they're ready. When cucumbers in my garden are ready for pickling my rule is don't open them before Halloween.

For the half sours or pickles in general? If in general I absolutely disagree. One week usually gives a great, strong flavor. I usually can't even wait the full week

Sour Blossom
Apr 21, 2005
L O L 6 6

I just packed together some lemons and salt with a few seasonings earlier. It's packed in a recycled liter pasta sauce jar since I won't have to pressure-cook it. Can't wait to have both lemon salt and preserved lemons on hand - I love salty and sour food.

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

very special boy


College Slice

Saint Darwin posted:

For the half sours or pickles in general? If in general I absolutely disagree. One week usually gives a great, strong flavor. I usually can't even wait the full week

That's for fresh pack dill cucumber refrigerator pickles. It would depend on the brine perhaps. I also lacto-ferment veggies and they're ready in 3 to 5 days.

Today I spent 2 hours in the northern Michigan woods and found nearly a pound of fresh morel mushrooms. I dry these.

pr0k
Jan 16, 2001

"Well if it's gonna be
that kind of party..."



Sup goons with jars - here's four batches of strawberry. Protip - go to the Sunday farmer's market at closing time. Every stand has a table still full of strawberries. You are bargaining from a position of strength. They really don't want to load those berries back up and either compost them or feed them to pigs.

Cpt.Wacky
Apr 17, 2005


I'm interested in learning to can this year but my stove is a smooth top model. The manual doesn't say anything about canning. What are my options? Is there some sort of test I can do with boiling water to see if it will work? I do have a propane burner for homebrewing but I'd rather not use it for canning because propane is expensive and I'd have to use it outside.

Bird in a Blender
Nov 17, 2005

It's amazing what they can do with computers these days.


pr0k posted:



Sup goons with jars - here's four batches of strawberry. Protip - go to the Sunday farmer's market at closing time. Every stand has a table still full of strawberries. You are bargaining from a position of strength. They really don't want to load those berries back up and either compost them or feed them to pigs.

I'm glad your market has surplus berries because it seems like every time I go to my farmer's market they run out before closing time. Although it's not quite strawberry season where I'm at.

theacox
Jun 8, 2010

You can't be serious.


Cpt.Wacky posted:

I'm interested in learning to can this year but my stove is a smooth top model. The manual doesn't say anything about canning. What are my options? Is there some sort of test I can do with boiling water to see if it will work? I do have a propane burner for homebrewing but I'd rather not use it for canning because propane is expensive and I'd have to use it outside.

I've been using my glass top stove to can for 5 years now, both water bath and pressure (I started before I read OH GOD NEVER CAN ON A GLASS TOP STOVE). I have never had a problem. The one I have is a mid-range model. It does, however, take a long time to bring 2-3 gallons of water to a boil. I'm sure it varies depending on model. I would think that cheap would break easier.

Now that I told you that, you will try it and something will break.

Cpt.Wacky
Apr 17, 2005


theacox posted:

I've been using my glass top stove to can for 5 years now, both water bath and pressure (I started before I read OH GOD NEVER CAN ON A GLASS TOP STOVE). I have never had a problem. The one I have is a mid-range model. It does, however, take a long time to bring 2-3 gallons of water to a boil. I'm sure it varies depending on model. I would think that cheap would break easier.

Now that I told you that, you will try it and something will break.

I've boiled several gallons on the stove for homebrewing before, keeping it boiling for an hour or so, and nothing broke but it did take a while to get there. The stove came with the house when I bought it and it's neither super-cheap or expensive, but probably closer to the cheap side. I guess I'll give it a try. Worst case I get to buy a decent stove after this one breaks.

HUGE PUBES A PLUS
Apr 30, 2005

very special boy


College Slice

A local farmer brought over 5 lbs of freshly picked asparagus this morning. I'm thinking I have enough to start some pickled asparagus. If anyone has a favorite recipe I'm interested.

Arsenic Lupin
Apr 11, 2012

This particularly rapid unintelligible patter isn't generally heard, and if it is, it doesn't matter.



Seville oranges are very difficult to find in the U.S. Sob! I did once make a three-lime marmalade that was out of this world. (Persian limes, Key limes, and the rind of Thai limes.)

I am resistant to the OP's insistence that only US recipes can be trusted in the specific case of jams and jellies. Jams and jellies are high-acid and thus inhospitable to botulism. If botulism were running rampant in France and England, both of which seal jam jars with waxed discs or wax paper, they'd have changed their practices. I have a personal interest, because I make jams and jellies from both French and English recipes. I seal with Ball lids and water-process out of an abundance of caution, but I use the sugar/fruit proportions in the European recipes.

This isn't "But my mama never got botulism from open-canned tomatoes!" it's "Health-conscious countries with modern sanitation use standard open-kettle jam & jelly processes without apparent problems." See here for graphs -- notice the rates rather than the number of cases. The major cause of botulism in France is ham. Not a single one of the outbreaks listed is caused by home-made jam or jelly: the ones caused by home-canned foods are low-acid foods like asparagus and green beans.

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pr0k
Jan 16, 2001

"Well if it's gonna be
that kind of party..."

I grew up sealing jam with paraffin. Worst thing I've seen is black mold on the top if the paraffin didn't seal properly. That said, I waterbath my jam because vacuum is better than wax and one less thing to buy.

theacox posted:

I've been using my glass top stove to can for 5 years now, both water bath and pressure (I started before I read OH GOD NEVER CAN ON A GLASS TOP STOVE). I have never had a problem. The one I have is a mid-range model. It does, however, take a long time to bring 2-3 gallons of water to a boil. I'm sure it varies depending on model. I would think that cheap would break easier.

Now that I told you that, you will try it and something will break.

Takes about 10 minutes for me to bring maybe 4 gal to boil. But I don't use that enameled canning pot most people use. I use a big fuckoff Presto pressure canner - I just don't use the lid when waterbath canning. It's got a nice flat, thick cast aluminum bottom. I highly recommend picking one up if you have the means. (and don't mind probably getting put on the FBI's list of terrorist jelly makers.)

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