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neongrey
Feb 28, 2007

Plaguing your posts with incidental music.

But if you want to match symbols to the type of tea you're using, look up about half an inch.

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aldantefax
Oct 10, 2007

ALWAYS BE MECHFISHIN'

Sirotan posted:

Well drat, that's really kind of brilliant. Though I really have no idea which symbols are supposed to mean which kind of tea.

The pagoda on black is black tea, the dragon is oolong (from 'wulong', or black dragon), the green tea is self explanatory, and uh I don't know what the symbol is on the white tea one.

This kind of feeds into a topic that I might have some words on about "the right equipment for tea" - while there is certainly quite a bit of purpose driven tea-related gear, there are plenty of times when I have used ghetto methods to prepare tea with decent results. Hell, when I wash oolongs instead of using a fancy draining tray I have a plastic pitcher that I also use to refill my water boiler. Thermoses for hot water at the correct temperature when there otherwise would be none. Rinsed coffee filters in place of tea bags or infusers.

Pretty much there's all sorts of stupid dog tricks that are floating around with regards to tea like the little peeing clay figures that the Chinese use to determine water temperature (thermometers are wusses) and the best part is they all do work if you pay attention to them.

Lavender Philtrum
May 16, 2011


Hey tea guys. I've always thought tea was just gross. It tastes really weird and gross when I drink it, and makes my mouth feel weird and gives me a general unpleasant feeling after I've finished drinking it.

That's what I thought, at least. But I recently read this thread and realized that the only tea I've actually had is lovely generic English Breakfast / earl grey / etc teabags from grocery stores and I'm probably just drinking really lovely tea and oversteeping it!

Would you guys suggest I go and find a cafe where I can get a good cup of tea and see if I like it first, or just drop some cash on some good, quality tea and make it myself? Apparently Adagio operates very close to me, maybe I could go do some shopping there?

edit: Worth mentioning I'm a trainride away from the city of Chicago and I'm willing to spend a silly amount of money on a cup of coffee/tea, so going to an Intelligentsia or something is possible. I just want to know what would be best for a first timer.


Also, what's the consensus on bubble tea? Is it so far off from brewed hot tea (like iced tea, etc) that it doesn't even belong in this thread?

Lavender Philtrum fucked around with this message at Nov 4, 2011 around 10:42

aldantefax
Oct 10, 2007

ALWAYS BE MECHFISHIN'

I would say to go to a cafe first since they're used to brewing 'proper' tea and you can't really go wrong unless you leave the tea steeping. Most cafes (I know at least Peet's Coffee & Tea does this) will pack a loose leaf bag of tea and leave it in a cup of hot water, and there's a bunch of tea in there, so if you don't remove the bag quickly you can have the same kind of situation you did before.

If Adagio has a brick and mortar location near you (didn't even know they had physical stores) then by all means go around and be nosy as hell. Seeing how you're willing to spend money on tea stuff means that they are probably much more receptive to give you proper advice and some samples to try out, albeit in small amounts.

With regards to the bubble tea thing, it is just black or green tea steeped in milk plus garnishes (tapioca 'bubbles', jelly, etc) - you can have it hot or chilled. It tends to be quite sweet, so a nice summer treat chilled, and a mostly pleasant one hot in the cold season. I could probably do a how-to on it since I have like six pounds or so of tapioca balls that I haven't done anything with for awhile.

In short, yeah, I'd say as long as there's actual tea in it, it qualifies for this thread, but it ain't my thread so DurianGray and the mods call the shots on that one!

muscat_gummy
Nov 30, 2008


Lavender Philtrum posted:

edit: Worth mentioning I'm a trainride away from the city of Chicago and I'm willing to spend a silly amount of money on a cup of coffee/tea, so going to an Intelligentsia or something is possible. I just want to know what would be best for a first timer.

I also didn't like black tea for a while and started out by drinking herbal teas. I found it easier to get into whatever is the proper term for flavored teas (example: peach teas are awesome). Maybe give something like peppermint tea a try since it's so different from what you've been used to? You can get mint green/whatever tea if you want something that's not just herbal.

I don't know what Agadio's policies are, but the small local tea shop close to where I live will actually steep small sample amounts for free if you're not sure what you want or if you want it. (Unfortunately I live nowhere near where you do, so I don't know if there's anything comparable in your part of the US.)

I buy loose leaf tea at Central Market; if you have a similarly fancy grocery store where you can buy tea in bulk, you might be able to just buy small amounts of different things to try. I usually buy around an ounce to try something new out but could buy even less if I wanted to.

axolotl farmer
May 17, 2007

I had me a vision
there wasn't any television



Nap Ghost

Lavender Philtrum posted:


Would you guys suggest I go and find a cafe where I can get a good cup of tea and see if I like it first, or just drop some cash on some good, quality tea and make it myself? Apparently Adagio operates very close to me, maybe I could go do some shopping there?


Go to a good sushi place and order green tea with your meal. That's the only decent tea you will get served at a restaurant or cafe. Usually you just get a cup of tepid water and a tea bag.

If cafes serve loose leaf, it's usually crammed into a too small strainer and you won't get a good extraction.

Devi
Jan 15, 2006

CYCLOPS
WAS RIGHT


Lavender Philtrum posted:

Would you guys suggest I go and find a cafe where I can get a good cup of tea and see if I like it first, or just drop some cash on some good, quality tea and make it myself? Apparently Adagio operates very close to me, maybe I could go do some shopping there?

edit: Worth mentioning I'm a trainride away from the city of Chicago and I'm willing to spend a silly amount of money on a cup of coffee/tea, so going to an Intelligentsia or something is possible. I just want to know what would be best for a first timer.

Yes, find a tea shop! I was in the same boat as you, mostly. I'd had some loose tea and bagged tea and liked it but I only went for the flavored black stuff and thought the rest was terrible because whenever I got it or had it, it wasn't brewed properly. When I stumbled on a tea shop that does regular Tea 101 events to introduce people to different kinds of teas, I went to the next one so I could see what this stuff is supposed to taste like. Tea is really good when it's done right.

If you're in the suburban Chicago area, I can't recommened Serene Teaz enough. They have locations in Wheaton and Elmhurst. They'll brew samples of anything you want, answer all your questions, and they have a great selection of teas and everything is available to sniff.

It's been a while since I've been to Adagio but I remember being stunned at the amount of tea. They'll definitely brew you a cup if you pay and given the kind of store they are, that cup will be made right. I don't remember if they did samples. But from what I've read, they're reasonable priced. Go there or anywhere else before Teavana (if you go there). You'll want to learn stuff elsewhere and not get suckered into buying hundreds of dollars of tea and teaware.

Go to a tea shop. Every cafe (be it indie place, Starbucks, Caribou, or Seattle's Best) has ruined bagged tea. They use water that's too hot for anything but black tea (or teas that they don't even carry) and they don't tell you how long to steep it. Those places are why I didn't like green or white tea. It was always burnt.

aldantefax posted:


With regards to the bubble tea thing, it is just black or green tea steeped in milk plus garnishes (tapioca 'bubbles', jelly, etc) - you can have it hot or chilled. It tends to be quite sweet, so a nice summer treat chilled, and a mostly pleasant one hot in the cold season. I could probably do a how-to on it since I have like six pounds or so of tapioca balls that I haven't done anything with for awhile.

I had no idea bubble tea could be hot. Oh man. I need to revisit the tea shop that doesn't have much but tea drinks and try this.


axolotl farmer posted:

Go to a good sushi place and order green tea with your meal. That's the only decent tea you will get served at a restaurant or cafe. Usually you just get a cup of tepid water and a tea bag.


That's great advice. I fell in love with genmaicha again after having it at a Chinese place. As much as I hate to admit it, Benihana has a really nice tea blend.

aldantefax
Oct 10, 2007

ALWAYS BE MECHFISHIN'

I think I can probably wrangle together a solid "beginner's tea" flight for the thread to try for people who are looking into getting into tea but they don't know where to start. Really, it'd be just a shortlist of good starter teas to help find out what kinds of teas you like and make some recommendations from there, plus the general equipment.

I'm also working on a SECRET PROJECT but I need to get some more pictures and maybe video? It is, of course, tea related.

Caitlin
Aug 18, 2006

When I die, if there is a heaven, I will spend eternity rolling around with a pile of kittens.


Every bubble tea place around me is a glorified smoothie with tapioca in it and has little to nothing to do with tea. And I live in the Chicago suburbs.

That's not to say I don't love the stuff like a fat kid loves candy, but actual "tea"? Nope. There's usually a few that involve tea but they're always iced - at least in my experience.

http://www.joyyee.com/drinklist-Chinatown.shtml

General best bubble tea in the Chicagoland area, however, can be found at Joy Yee's. Check the website for locations near you, etc. etc. as they have more than a few and I'm not sure which side of Chicago you're on. Food is okay, but their freezes are the main attraction. They also use Blendtecs!

aldantefax
Oct 10, 2007

ALWAYS BE MECHFISHIN'

Not saying that you're wrong, since there's a lot of people that gently caress around with the formula and you end up removing the tea entirely! I'm just saying that's the traditional base that you'd mix your powder/syrups and milk into. The "bubble" part of bubble tea doesn't come from tapioca pearls, it used to refer to the foam you get from stirring/shaking the tea with the pearls as part of the final mixing step!

Depends on the place, though. I know TeaWay (which is partnered/subsidiary of tuttimelon) actually uses tea in their mixtures, so if you're getting a glorified smoothie...

Serendipitaet
Apr 19, 2009


Can I steep a darjeeling twice or would that be a waste of time?

After having to resort to bags for a while I finally managed to go to Camellia Sinensis (mentioned in the OP) and got myself some leaves to boil. The guy at the shop was really helpful, but I forgot to ask.

Thoht
Aug 3, 2006



Yeah, I pretty much always steep my black teas at least twice, usually thrice (combining the second and third steeps usually makes it come out more balanced and complex than drinking either alone). Just make sure you steep it longer for your second steep and probably with less water, to make it more concentrated.

DurianGray
Dec 23, 2010

King of Fruits


Hey, Aldantefax and anybody else who wants to do a write-up or how-to guide of some sort, feel free! As long as it's mildly tea related and has good information in it, do whatever you want.

I think that bubble tea probably has a place here if you want to discuss it, I'm really not picky. Any sort of alternative non/semi-teas you want to discuss is fine by me. I know I'd actually love to see some information on kombucha if anybody is familiar with it.

Serendipitaet, I'd say you could resteep your darjeeling. I mean, at worst, you get a watered down second steeping, so it's worth a try. I've resteeped mine before and it was fine.

Caitlin
Aug 18, 2006

When I die, if there is a heaven, I will spend eternity rolling around with a pile of kittens.


aldantefax posted:

Not saying that you're wrong, since there's a lot of people that gently caress around with the formula and you end up removing the tea entirely! I'm just saying that's the traditional base that you'd mix your powder/syrups and milk into. The "bubble" part of bubble tea doesn't come from tapioca pearls, it used to refer to the foam you get from stirring/shaking the tea with the pearls as part of the final mixing step!

Depends on the place, though. I know TeaWay (which is partnered/subsidiary of tuttimelon) actually uses tea in their mixtures, so if you're getting a glorified smoothie...

At least it's a deliciously glorified smoothie. The pureed hunks of fresh mango are amaaaazing.

aldantefax
Oct 10, 2007

ALWAYS BE MECHFISHIN'

Serendipitaet posted:

Can I steep a darjeeling twice or would that be a waste of time?

The best advice I can give is "experiment" like the others were saying. Some black teas take well to resteeps, but flavored black teas, earl greys, etc. that have some type of additive will tend to be notably weaker. Darjeelings are somewhat like that but it really just depends on your personal preference. The only thing you stand to lose is some water, and if it works for you, good!

Speaking of, time for some Foojoy brand Lychee black tea, maybe. It's cold!


Two Foojoy brand black teas

Darval
Nov 20, 2007

Shiny.

Can tea go bad? I've got a bag of green tea I bought in Japan over a year ago, and I've been using it infrequently ever since. I had some other green tea at a friends house the other day, and it seemed a bit.. Different to mine. Like my tea was a bit off. It's been stored dry at room temperature, but the bag it's been in has not been sealed very well so it's been open to air.

aldantefax
Oct 10, 2007

ALWAYS BE MECHFISHIN'

Most green teas do not age very well but lots of different green teas have distinct flavor profiles, so unless you and your buddy are drinking the exact same teas and they just kept it better than you did, it may be a difference of quality and flavor. Prolonged exposure to air can make the leaves go stale, in addition to exposure to direct light.

Darval
Nov 20, 2007

Shiny.

Hm, it's probably gone a bit stale then, but it still tastes fine enough for me. I've got some unopened packs of Green Tea, I'll remember to keep those sealed better. Thanks.

Culinary Bears
Feb 1, 2007



I highly recommend ordering some of Upton Tea's silver ziplock bags (they're under Accessories, in Storage -> Caddies, Tins, and Bags). The 125g bags are really big (about 5.5 inches wide, 7.5 inches to the zipper, and can bulk out to a diameter of about 2 inches at the middle); you probably don't need the 250gs unless you're storing some seriously bulk/bulky stuff. I ordered a hundred pack of the 125gs and it's more than enough for all my herbs, spices, teas and then some.

They're really cheap, really easy to store (put them anywhere, squish them, whatever), open and close easily, totally lightproof and pretty airtight. I don't know if the zip might wear out after a lot of use (hasn't happened to me yet), but they're dirt cheap so who cares.

Their steel tins are good stuff too, but you can probably find similar stuff at any online container store.

aldantefax
Oct 10, 2007

ALWAYS BE MECHFISHIN'

Man, so, I tried that Foojoy Lichee black tea, since the box next to it of the Yunnan Gold is actually pretty good.

What a disappointment! The infusion of lychee and the actual tea leaves themselves made the whole cup taste crumby. My old man said he didn't like it, but now that I've actually had a cup, this is probably the crumbiest loose leaf I've had in ages. I have a whole tin of it though, so I might try blending it with some stuff to kick it up, but by itself you'll probably need to just mask it with milk and sugar just to get a decent cup.

Niemat
Mar 21, 2011

I gave that pitch vibrato. Pitches love vibrato.


Can I go ahead and throw out another "If you're just getting into tea (and even sometimes if you're already into it), DON'T go to Teavana right away"...? I used to work there (but have since moved on to the local tea shop), and the training actually states you need to hear "no" FIVE times before you drop the subject... I quit pretty quickly.

Also, someone mentioned earlier (I apologize for forgetting who) Teavana employees work for commission. To clarify, Teavana employees don't work for commission, per se--it's more of an incentive program where if you sell so much per hour, you get a percentage of that back. However, the bulk of your paycheck is still coming from your hourly wage. In other words, you're not putting any tea selling employees on the street by telling them no, so don't be afraid to if you're uncomfortable with where things are going!

Edit: That being said, I don't harbor any ill will towards Teavana, and I still use some of their products, go visit, etc. I'm just stressing don't let them think you need to drop $500 to properly enjoy a cup of tea.

Niemat fucked around with this message at Nov 7, 2011 around 20:32

Sirotan
Oct 17, 2006

Sirotan is a seal.


Ham Wrangler

Niemat posted:

Can I go ahead and throw out another "If you're just getting into tea (and even sometimes if you're already into it), DON'T go to Teavana right away"...? I used to work there (but have since moved on to the local tea shop), and the training actually states you need to hear "no" FIVE times before you drop the subject... I quit pretty quickly.

Welp, I guess now when I go in I'll just start out the conversation with "I'm just browsing...and pretend I said that five times". Its really too bad their sales tactics are so high pressure, Teavana did get me into tea and while now I know better and see that their markup is quite high, I think they have high quality product and its certainly a store that might be more accessible to the public vs other smaller tea shops. I eventually stopped shopping there for the obnoxious sales people that won't leave you alone, rather than the prices.

aldantefax
Oct 10, 2007

ALWAYS BE MECHFISHIN'

I have found in my experiences with Teavana the best is to just shop there for their accessories, which are quite reasonably priced and of decent quality. Teas tend to be found elsewhere, and I was pretty disappointed with their Monkey Picked Tie Guan Yin. Since I come in there purpose-driven with the intent to buy a specific thing, I don't think I particularly was pressured into buying much anything else (maybe a polite request to purchase some teas along with the 'wares). It's really looking rather indecisive when you walk in that places like Teavana will start squeezing for you.

As general tea shopping advice goes, don't go looking to spend more than fifty bucks on your first serious outing for tea. Pick one or two medium-quality samples and a nice small personal teapot with a strainer or some disposable tea bags you can fill.

Caitlin
Aug 18, 2006

When I die, if there is a heaven, I will spend eternity rolling around with a pile of kittens.


Teavana's accessories are ungodly overpriced what are you talking about

I'm not going to argue personal preferences on tea but they charge like $8 for a $1.50 tea strainer.

Hummingbirds
Feb 17, 2011



Because you all inspired me to get into loose leaf tea, I thought I would post some pictures of the most interesting types of tea I have so far. The quality of the pictures isn't great but you can definitely see the unique qualities of each one. Sadly these are all from Adagio but they are pretty good to my as-yet-unrefined palate.

Golden Monkey
Just got this today. It smells slightly like my pu erh, which was a little off-putting, but the tea itself is fruity and light and delicious. Supposedly, it's one leaf/one bud whole leaf tea but I'm not sure I buy it.


Yunnan Gold
I have not tried this stuff yet but you all said that Yunnan blacks were good, so I have faith. Definitely looks like buds only, very velvety.


Genmai cha
I have only tried it once, and I think I may have brewed it too strong, but I didn't really like it. I wish I could chalk it up to Adagio being somewhat plebeian but I can't imagine they could mess up what is supposed to be "poor man's tea." Still, it was cool to open up the bag and see what looked like tiny popcorns in there


Pu Erh Dante
The first time I smelled it, I liked it even though it is kind of stinky. When I tasted it, I found that it tastes better than it smells -- at least at first. In my humble opinion, this stuff has to be drunk while it is still very hot or else it gets really gross. Probably the weirdest thing about this tea, to me, is how super-dark the liquor gets. I did a double-take when I first poured it into my white teacup.


Gunpowder
Holy crap is this stuff good. I first tried it when a friend got it as a sampler and didn't like it, passing it off to me. It's seaweedy and stinky and awesome. I can get 3 good 2-minute brews out of one batch of leaves. I seriously love this tea, if I could take one kind of tea with me to a desert island it would be this one. If anyone has any suggestions for retailers who have a really good/cheap gunpowder, I am all ears.

Hummingbirds fucked around with this message at Nov 8, 2011 around 18:30

Bob_McBob
Mar 24, 2007


Hummingbirds posted:

Puh Er Dante
The first time I smelled it, I liked it even though it is kind of stinky. When I tasted it, I found that it tastes better than it smells -- at least at first. In my humble opinion, this stuff has to be drunk while it is still very hot or else it gets really gross. Probably the weirdest thing about this tea, to me, is how super-dark the liquor gets. I did a double-take when I first poured it into my white teacup.


I'm sorry your first experience with puerh had to be a lousy loose cooked tea. Adagio and other similar Western vendors are not the right source for puerh of any kind.

neongrey
Feb 28, 2007

Plaguing your posts with incidental music.

Bob_McBob posted:

I'm sorry your first experience with puerh had to be a lousy loose cooked tea. Adagio and other similar Western vendors are not the right source for puerh of any kind.

What would you recommend as a source for a reasonable pu-erh? I keep thinking I ought to at least try it (even though I don't especially expect to like it; what I've heard of its flavour profile isn't anything that appeals to me. But, I've been surprised before) and I'd like to at least give it a fair go.

aldantefax
Oct 10, 2007

ALWAYS BE MECHFISHIN'

Captain Stinkybutt posted:

Teavana's accessories are ungodly overpriced what are you talking about

I'm not going to argue personal preferences on tea but they charge like $8 for a $1.50 tea strainer.

At the risk of sounding like a corporate shill I'll say that their quality of product is fairly high for some of their stuff! For functional accessories I'll agree with you that they are pretty ridiculous, but for aesthetic accessories and more expensive stuff such as tetsubin and cast iron 'wares their prices tend to even out. They make their profits mostly on gouging for normally cheap accessories and tea in-store.

Still, the previous sentiments of caveat emptor for Teavana I can most certainly agree with!

Hummingbirds posted:

Genmaicha woes

A couple of things you could try:
  • Shorten infusion time (less than 90sec)
  • Reduce tea quantity
  • Strain as you pour!
The last one is especially important, as fine particulate matter from the tea can make it extra bitter (some people like it like that, I do not). Next time I'll take a picture of the filter I use after a full session of steeping with the five dollar HIME Brand genmaicha that I used in the post I wrote about it a couple pages ago.

neongrey posted:

What would you recommend as a source for a reasonable pu-erh?

Imperial Tea Court has a fairly large selection, but you're in Canada, so I couldn't really say there. Shou bing cha ('finished' pressed cake) pu-erh is the best bet to begin with the stuff, as I understand it; single servings may be better served with tuo cha (bird's nest) pu-erh, though.

Places that have strong roots in China tend to have the greatest selection of pu-erh. If you have a Chinatown in your area, it might be worth poking around there to see if they have a selection at all (and maybe you might find a new place - I've found that those kinds of tea places tend not to advertise online). Otherwise, your best bet might be to import from the US.

Failing that, we should hang some time. I have a Yellow Mark shou bing cha pu-erh that I've yet to bust open and start drinking!

aldantefax fucked around with this message at Nov 8, 2011 around 14:45

Niemat
Mar 21, 2011

I gave that pitch vibrato. Pitches love vibrato.


aldantefax posted:

At the risk of sounding like a corporate shill I'll say that their quality of product is fairly high for some of their stuff! For functional accessories I'll agree with you that they are pretty ridiculous, but for aesthetic accessories and more expensive stuff such as tetsubin and cast iron 'wares their prices tend to even out. They make their profits mostly on gouging for normally cheap accessories and tea in-store.

I will definitely agree with the quality of their items, but I can't help but be suspicious of their mark ups on the tetsubin... Our local tea shop is selling some of the same tetsubin WITH cups for about half to a third of the price of just the pot at Teavana. Again, I won't argue with the quality, but I definitely recommend shopping around a bit first.

On a vaguely unrelated note, does anyone know anything about Steepster?? I had never heard of it, but found a link on Upton's site. Is anyone here using it?

DurianGray
Dec 23, 2010

King of Fruits


Oh, I'd totally forgotten about Steepster! I had an account on there a while ago, and it's actually still around. I haven't been on there in a while but it doesn't look like it's changed much from a year or so ago. It's pretty good for reviews of teas from specific vendors that you might be thinking of trying out. A lot of the people on there tend to be pretty harsh in their criticisms, moreso than you'll see in reviews that might be hosted on the vendor's actual sites, which can be a good thing sometimes. It can be a good way of keeping notes on the teas that you have and what you liked or didn't like. Their forums, from what I remember, can get sort of catty occasionally. No idea if that's changed.

neongrey
Feb 28, 2007

Plaguing your posts with incidental music.

aldantefax posted:

Imperial Tea Court has a fairly large selection, but you're in Canada, so I couldn't really say there. Shou bing cha ('finished' pressed cake) pu-erh is the best bet to begin with the stuff, as I understand it; single servings may be better served with tuo cha (bird's nest) pu-erh, though.

Ugh yeah their shipping prices are pretty unreasonable to Canada.

quote:

Places that have strong roots in China tend to have the greatest selection of pu-erh. If you have a Chinatown in your area, it might be worth poking around there to see if they have a selection at all (and maybe you might find a new place - I've found that those kinds of tea places tend not to advertise online). Otherwise, your best bet might be to import from the US.

Yeah there's a couple places around town I know of I could check out and a couple other stores that might lead to some leads. I don't mind ordering in either, but I don't want to get reamed on shipping.

Hummingbirds
Feb 17, 2011



aldantefax posted:

A couple of things you could try:
  • Shorten infusion time (less than 90sec)
  • Reduce tea quantity
  • Strain as you pour!
The last one is especially important, as fine particulate matter from the tea can make it extra bitter (some people like it like that, I do not). Next time I'll take a picture of the filter I use after a full session of steeping with the five dollar HIME Brand genmaicha that I used in the post I wrote about it a couple pages ago.

Thanks for the tips! I tried it again with a 90-sec infusion (had done 2 minutes the first time) and it's much better now.

Niemat
Mar 21, 2011

I gave that pitch vibrato. Pitches love vibrato.


DurianGray posted:

Oh, I'd totally forgotten about Steepster! I had an account on there a while ago, and it's actually still around. I haven't been on there in a while but it doesn't look like it's changed much from a year or so ago. It's pretty good for reviews of teas from specific vendors that you might be thinking of trying out. A lot of the people on there tend to be pretty harsh in their criticisms, moreso than you'll see in reviews that might be hosted on the vendor's actual sites, which can be a good thing sometimes. It can be a good way of keeping notes on the teas that you have and what you liked or didn't like. Their forums, from what I remember, can get sort of catty occasionally. No idea if that's changed.

Right on. Maybe I'll try it out then.

If anyone's interested in giving it a whirl with me, my Steepster username is also Niemat.

aldantefax
Oct 10, 2007

ALWAYS BE MECHFISHIN'

I've been on there since beta as, predictably, aldantefax. Next month if they open up some slots I'll probably hop on board to their Select program since they tend to make good picks for teas!

e: hoho, they are STILL in beta. In any case, I followed Niemat!

Also, Hummingbird, glad to know that worked out well for you. Green teas do well for very short infusions, and even shorter for white teas. You can resteep genmaicha a few times, increasing infusion time by about 15sec each time!

aldantefax fucked around with this message at Nov 8, 2011 around 19:57

Devi
Jan 15, 2006

CYCLOPS
WAS RIGHT


I think I'm going to go to Adagio tomorrow since I'll be in the neighborhood and I'm ashamed of not visiting it earlier. Does anyone have any recommendations?

I've been drinking coconut tea and it's very nice. So I got some light coconut milk thinking that this would be awesome. It's...not bad. A little better with some sweetener. But not mind-blowing like I expected. I should have just added honey since a little bit of honey has made every tea I've tried it with so much better. And I never used to like honey in tea.

Hummingbirds
Feb 17, 2011



Devi posted:

I think I'm going to go to Adagio tomorrow since I'll be in the neighborhood and I'm ashamed of not visiting it earlier. Does anyone have any recommendations?

I've been drinking coconut tea and it's very nice. So I got some light coconut milk thinking that this would be awesome. It's...not bad. A little better with some sweetener. But not mind-blowing like I expected. I should have just added honey since a little bit of honey has made every tea I've tried it with so much better. And I never used to like honey in tea.

The jasmine chun hao is very light and floral, and all of their fruit-flavored blacks are good if you're into that kind of thing. I also really like their darjeeling #22 but I am positive there are way better places to get a darjeeling. Also, I love the gunpowder but again, there are probably better/cheaper retailers for that.

MedecoKiller
Jun 12, 2005

You used Kwikset?
Bahahaha!


aldantefax posted:

Failing that, we should hang some time. I have a Yellow Mark shou bing cha pu-erh that I've yet to bust open and start drinking!

CNNP Yellow mark is an example of Sheng bing cha pu-erh, which is green/raw as opposed to shou bing cha which is cooked/ripened. Shou pu-erh tea is force ripened to simulate aged sheng pu-erh in less time for economic reasons. The ripening process is controllable but is more likely to create teas with unappealing barnyard-like flavors.

As I mentioned before http://www.puerhshop.com/ is a great place to try different types of pu-erh since most sites do not specialize in this specific variety of tea.

aldantefax
Oct 10, 2007

ALWAYS BE MECHFISHIN'

This is actually the one I was referring to, which was noted as a finished (dark) puerh! https://www.imperialtea.com/Yellow-...Cake-P308.htmlp

Cool puerh shop though. Gonna have to order from them.

MedecoKiller
Jun 12, 2005

You used Kwikset?
Bahahaha!


aldantefax posted:

This is actually the one I was referring to, which was noted as a finished (dark) puerh! https://www.imperialtea.com/Yellow-...Cake-P308.htmlp

Cool puerh shop though. Gonna have to order from them.

You're right, seems they do make ripened yellow mark. http://www.puerhshop.com/index.php?...roducts_id=1036 (note the slight price difference)

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Devoyniche
Dec 21, 2008


Ugh, I made the mistake of buying flower scented tea again (Jasmine tea - I hadn't had it and at 50 cents an ounce, I figured it was worth a try). If you haven't had it, don't. It tastes like you're chugging down a cup of hand soap.

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