Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«80 »
  • Post
  • Reply
taters
Jun 13, 2005


EKDS5k posted:

That's what I would do. With the added step that if your water is already 80 degrees then I would warm the mug up with it first. I've been told that the "correct" way to do it is to boil the water once, and then let it cool, so if you're doing that then it'll be a matter of experimentation to find out how long to let it sit in your mug before adding the tea leaves.


Now I have a name for it, thanks! Googling that does indeed bring up some results.

Gong Fu preparation ranges from extremely formal ceremonies to two cups with a strainer and everything in between. If you are just preparing it for yourself, something like this is pretty useful.

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B01JVYOSIK/

You brew in the bottom and the cup is also the lid. I use a simlar one at work with an electric kettle at my desk.

You don't really need to do a wash on green teas, the first steep can be drank just fine. You should on Oolongs tho, especially the darker ones; the first steep can taste pretty bad.

Also Poo Erh is gross.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

SymmetryrtemmyS
Jul 13, 2013



taters posted:

Gong Fu preparation ranges from extremely formal ceremonies to two cups with a strainer and everything in between. If you are just preparing it for yourself, something like this is pretty useful.

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B01JVYOSIK/

You brew in the bottom and the cup is also the lid. I use a simlar one at work with an electric kettle at my desk.

You don't really need to do a wash on green teas, the first steep can be drank just fine. You should on Oolongs tho, especially the darker ones; the first steep can taste pretty bad.

Also Poo Erh is gross.

The point of puer isn't really the flavor. They can taste quite nice, but on flavor alone I'll usually pick an Oolong or darker green.

It gets you high. Puer is drug tea that doesn't show up on a piss test and won't get you fired.

chunkles
Aug 14, 2005

let's head to ruin!!


Upton updated their website and I miss the web circa 2001 thing it had going on.

UltimoDragonQuest
Oct 5, 2011



Teavivre's Black Friday sale started. 20-40% off most stuff until Saturday night (Sunday?). They'll do something for Cyber Monday but last year it was maybe a flat 20% and I was mad about missing the weekend sale.

I got oolongs because I have about 2lb of greens already.
Taiwan Monkey Picked (Ma Liu Mie) Tie Guan Yin - Smells like bread and tastes lightly roasted
Guang Dong Phoenix Dan Cong - More earthy than roasty but not all the way like a rock oolong.
Huang Guanyin (Yellow Goddess) Wuyi - It's a mystery.

Reviews of Spring 2017 teas.
Non-Premium Dragon Well - Grassy and nutty. The cheap stuff is good enough and I almost bought more today.
Organic Bai Hao (White Downy) - Strong and vegetal. Don't oversteep this.
Lu Shan Yun Wu - Light and nutty. Very good.
Organic Tian Mu Yun Wu Mao Feng - Lighter than the Bai Hao. I've only tried this one twice.
Premium Tai Ping Hou Kui - This is great. Sort of a stronger Long Jing and amazing large leaves.

RandomPauI
Nov 24, 2006

Can I say "shit" around the baby?


Grimey Drawer

I lost the gasket for my teavana perfectea. Is there any way to get a replacement?

Juaguocio
Jun 5, 2005

egregium sanctumque
uirum si cerno,
bimembri hoc
monstrum puero


UltimoDragonQuest posted:

Teavivre's Black Friday sale started. 20-40% off most stuff until Saturday night (Sunday?). They'll do something for Cyber Monday but last year it was maybe a flat 20% and I was mad about missing the weekend sale.

I got oolongs because I have about 2lb of greens already.
Taiwan Monkey Picked (Ma Liu Mie) Tie Guan Yin - Smells like bread and tastes lightly roasted
Guang Dong Phoenix Dan Cong - More earthy than roasty but not all the way like a rock oolong.
Huang Guanyin (Yellow Goddess) Wuyi - It's a mystery.

Reviews of Spring 2017 teas.
Non-Premium Dragon Well - Grassy and nutty. The cheap stuff is good enough and I almost bought more today.
Organic Bai Hao (White Downy) - Strong and vegetal. Don't oversteep this.
Lu Shan Yun Wu - Light and nutty. Very good.
Organic Tian Mu Yun Wu Mao Feng - Lighter than the Bai Hao. I've only tried this one twice.
Premium Tai Ping Hou Kui - This is great. Sort of a stronger Long Jing and amazing large leaves.

Their standard grade Silver Needle is really nice this year. I'm getting a whole bunch with my Black Friday order.
I've tried both the Premium and Superfine Longjing. The Superfine is definitely better, but the Premium is excellent as well.
I was kind of disappointed in their Keemuns this year, but the Superfine Fragrant is really good.

I still need to finish my Teavivre stash from last year, but here I am ordering more tea.

value-brand cereal
May 2, 2008
I steal other peoples food and am a twat

Teavivre haul: not much.
Taiwan Osmanthus Oolong Tea
Lychee Black Tea - Free Sample

Just because taiwan is number one in my heart, and after reading up on farming practices, I don't really trust food from China, even if lead poisoning wouldn't make me that much dumber XD . Also lol at them needing a legendary concubine to justify lychee flavored tea.

fknlo
Jul 6, 2009

ALL of them.


Jhet posted:

Try different teas in a variety you already like, then try making them cold. The more you try, the better of an idea you'll have when it comes to origin and style of leaf. Don't go buying anything that's $20/4oz or anything, but $6-10/4oz is a good place to start. There are a bunch of links to online tea shops in the OP, and most of them have good black teas to try. Without knowing what kind of tea you like, it's really hard to give recommendations, but this one is pretty decent and cheap enough to drink it a lot https://www.teasource.com/collectio...d-tea-black-tea .

Same for the greens, but I'm really in love with the ones TeaVivre has had the last couple years. Chinese greens not Japanese, but there are plenty of other shops that carry Japanese greens to make iced.

I should mention that TeaVivre is giving away free samples for a couple more days. No purchase necessary I think?

Cold brewing is super easy, just add water and pop it into your fridge overnight and remove the leaves when you're happy with the flavor.

So I went ahead and bought the classic iced tea and a few other varieties from Teasource. I'm actually a bit surprised in the flavor differences between them. I ordered a few more types yesterday to take advantage of their black friday sale and a coupon they sent me with my first order.

How many round teaspoons should I be using for a 2 quart cold brew setup? I've been using anywhere between 6-8 and haven't really noticed any differences between the different amounts.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


fknlo posted:

So I went ahead and bought the classic iced tea and a few other varieties from Teasource. I'm actually a bit surprised in the flavor differences between them. I ordered a few more types yesterday to take advantage of their black friday sale and a coupon they sent me with my first order.

How many round teaspoons should I be using for a 2 quart cold brew setup? I've been using anywhere between 6-8 and haven't really noticed any differences between the different amounts.

When I worked there almost a decade ago, it was +/- 3g per cup normally with a hot steep. You should be able to get away with about that still and I think it's about 12-15g per quart and that should work alright with cold brew as well. 1 tsp of the classic iced tea should be about 3g due to the size of those leaves. 6-8 should be about right, but if you're not noticing a difference, definitely go with the lesser amount so it lasts a little longer. I like the way they do their black blends there. Most of them are really solid drinkers.

It's a personal taste preference when it comes down to it, so there's not really a wrong way to do it if you like the results. (Except for boiling tea bags for Southern sweet tea. Don't do that. It's nasty.)

Archenteron
Nov 3, 2006



Just dropped about 50 bucks on a large assortment of puerh samplers from Teavivre, so that should be tasty.

Amergin
Jan 29, 2013

THE SOUND A WET FART MAKES


Wife's aunt took us out to a tea place here in Kunming for a tasting. Tried a heilong, another red that was gushu something something, a jasmine white, current year Pu'er and a 2002 Pu'er. I was floored at how the flavors could develop like that... very smooth, very complex. The jasmine white was delicious and light and refreshing, the heilong was a great overall everyday tea, the gushu was a really rich and complex umami, almost mushroom-like flavor. Afterwards we went to a second place and had... what I think was an "uncooked" green that they called a "yellow" tea? Which wasn't as deep but was a good plain drinking tea. I'm going to have to get myself a small set for work and do some tea here in the afternoons.

K that's my tea story.

Scaramouche
Mar 26, 2001

SPACE FACE! SPACE FACE!

Do you guys have any words about Two Leaves and a Bud tea? We might start carrying them but I obviously can't do that without the goon go-ahead.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Scaramouche posted:

Do you guys have any words about Two Leaves and a Bud tea? We might start carrying them but I obviously can't do that without the goon go-ahead.

Itís meh. And very overpriced. Consumer prices are like $9 for 15 bags of mediocre tea. Itís better than Lipton and Twinnings, and theyíre also very much more interested in blending it looks like.

I put them in flashy but not a lot of substance category.

snowdoge
Jul 2, 2009


I guess all Teavana stores are going to start closing, so I went to the one by work to see if they had any decent sales. Mind you, I NEVER shop at Teavana, their customer service model has always been notoriously pushy. Even on the edge of death in a store full of red ticketed merchandise, all 8 employees in the 3 square ft store still harassed me. Good riddance.

Having said that, I did pick up a teaball and 6oz bag of gingerbread for 8 bucks. Hopefully closer to 2018, there will be more significant markdowns.

Scaramouche
Mar 26, 2001

SPACE FACE! SPACE FACE!

Jhet posted:

Itís meh. And very overpriced. Consumer prices are like $9 for 15 bags of mediocre tea. Itís better than Lipton and Twinnings, and theyíre also very much more interested in blending it looks like.

I put them in flashy but not a lot of substance category.

Well given that our current stock is Numi, Tazo, and Twinnings I'm not sure if I should consider that an upgrade or not.

gamingCaffeinator
Sep 6, 2010

I shall sing you the song of my people.


RandomPauI posted:

I lost the gasket for my teavana perfectea. Is there any way to get a replacement?

Teavana's shutting down all their stores and poo poo is cheeeap (33-75% off) right now, so you can probably get a new one. I don't know if they do replacement parts though. Their online store is going down on Dec. 15 too.

Starbuuuucks

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


Scaramouche posted:

Well given that our current stock is Numi, Tazo, and Twinnings I'm not sure if I should consider that an upgrade or not.

Itís about even with Numi and Tazo. Clearly not a tea shop, so itíll do fine probably.

Although if you could get one of those tea kiosk things you posted about up thread, that would be much cooler.

RandomPauI
Nov 24, 2006

Can I say "shit" around the baby?


Grimey Drawer

gamingCaffeinator posted:

Teavana's shutting down all their stores and poo poo is cheeeap (33-75% off) right now, so you can probably get a new one. I don't know if they do replacement parts though. Their online store is going down on Dec. 15 too.

Starbuuuucks

They didn't have a replacement gasket so I just bought a new plastic one and a ceramic mug with tea strainer and lid. I also thought about picking up some tea but the flavors that they had left in stock didn't appeal to me all that much for some reason.

tweet my meat
Oct 2, 2013


How long does tea keep? I got into it big a while back and lost interest in the hobby and didn't have the motivation to blow through my stocks, so I have a basket full of fancy loose leaf sitting in my cabinets. The pu erh I think keeps indefinitely, but what about the greens blacks and herbals? They're stored in airtight opaque bags in cool-ish conditions.

E:Judging by my last post in the thread, I'd guess it was about 2.5-3 years that these have been sitting.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


tweet my meat posted:

How long does tea keep? I got into it big a while back and lost interest in the hobby and didn't have the motivation to blow through my stocks, so I have a basket full of fancy loose leaf sitting in my cabinets. The pu erh I think keeps indefinitely, but what about the greens blacks and herbals? They're stored in airtight opaque bags in cool-ish conditions.

E:Judging by my last post in the thread, I'd guess it was about 2.5-3 years that these have been sitting.

May have gotten a little stale, but the only way you'll know is to drink them. The blacks will probably be better than the greens. Herbals will depend on what's in them entirely. Anything with delicate flavors will tend to suffer more than things with robust flavors. They just won't be quite as robust anymore.

Puerh's should be fine or maybe better depending on how well they were stored. I have a couple puerh's that I've had bricks of for the better part of a decade and every so often I open them up from their dark and dry storage to find out how they taste. I enjoy them, but not so much that I'd drink the whole thing quickly enough to where it won't have a chance to age. Also, I bought a few too many about 6 years ago anyway, so my stock is far too large. They don't seem to be harmed by the time at all.

Archenteron
Nov 3, 2006



I now have like eighteen different puerh tea samplers

Teavivre was nice and gave me two more puerhs as free samples

Archenteron
Nov 3, 2006



Archenteron posted:

I now have like eighteen different puerh tea samplers

Teavivre was nice and gave me two more puerhs as free samples

So one of those samples is their Moonlight Beauty Raw Pu-erh Loose Tea, which according to their website, is a new style of lightly fermented almost-white-tea pu'erh. It was a very pleasant light brew with a subtle malty sweetness to it. I've never seen that style of tea leaf before (the long thick buds). Due to the amount of tea in the sampler and the difficulty measuring it, I ended up doing some sort of weird teapot/gonfu hybrid brew: loaded up the infuser basket in my little tetsubin and started at a 3min brew, increasing by 20 seconds each subsequent time. Got a full day's worth of very nice drinking out of it.

dms666
Oct 17, 2005

It's Playoff Beard Time! Go Pens!

I tried gyokuro Chinese green tea for the first time at a tea shop recently and it was so delicious. Can anyone recommend anything with a similar taste? It is kind of on the higher end of what I would pay for tea, wondering if there are any alternatives. It has kind of a briney/seaweed green taste.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


dms666 posted:

I tried gyokuro Chinese green tea for the first time at a tea shop recently and it was so delicious. Can anyone recommend anything with a similar taste? It is kind of on the higher end of what I would pay for tea, wondering if there are any alternatives. It has kind of a briney/seaweed green taste.

Try out some Japanese greens, which is what gyokuro is anyway. Itís shade grown at the end at least and more expensive. I donít remember which others are stronger brine/seaweed. Most of the Japanese greens I can remember do have some of that to them though. Itís been a while though so I canít point to specifics.

Best bet is to shop around and try a few things to narrow it down.

Reiterpallasch
Nov 3, 2010

strength accessories?

Fun Shoe

dms666 posted:

I tried gyokuro Chinese green tea for the first time at a tea shop recently and it was so delicious. Can anyone recommend anything with a similar taste? It is kind of on the higher end of what I would pay for tea, wondering if there are any alternatives. It has kind of a briney/seaweed green taste.

Gyokuro is a Japanese style usually grown with specialist cultivars and undergoes a fairly labor-intensive production process--I'm actually fairly surprised you found a quality Chinese gyokuro. Is the tea shop the sort that sells online? I'm fairly curious, now.

The savory/briny character comes from the shading process. The plant is shaded for ~21 days before harvest; the stress apparently inhibits the conversion of savory/sweet chemicals to bitter chemicals in the leaf or something. That means one harvest per growing season even in warmer areas, so finding a cheap gyokuro could be quite difficult. Look for a machine-harvested, tarp-shaded (both modern cost-cutting innovations) gyokuro produced from a farm that still adheres to the full shading period. Uji/Kyoto gyokuro is the orthodox, well-balanced option which still maintains some astringency. Recently, teas from Yame in Kyushu have been taking advantage of the warmer climate to grow the (frost-vulnerable) saemidori cultivar, which cranks the savory/sweet nature to 11 at the cost of some aroma.

I would expect to pay a minimum of $0.25/gram for quality gyokuro, even the machine-picked stuff.

If you can't find a gyokuro within your price range, consider a kabuse-cha instead. Kabuse gets a 10+ day shading process which makes it something of a middle point between gyokuro and other green teas. The good stuff has a very noticeable savoryness paired with a traditional tea astringency. Some of the best comes from Mie/Ise. You can get fairly premium kabuse for $0.15-$0.20/gram.

Reiterpallasch
Nov 3, 2010

strength accessories?

Fun Shoe

TLDR: if you want MAXIMUM SAVORY, look for a handpicked gyokuro from Yame/Kyushu, preferably of the saemidori or ujihikari cultivars.

If you want something reasonably priced, look for a kabuse-cha from a good vendor.

Juaguocio
Jun 5, 2005

egregium sanctumque
uirum si cerno,
bimembri hoc
monstrum puero


I've been having a lot of fun comparing Teavivre's different grades of Longjing. I don't have any of the really expensive ones, but the Premium and Superfine are both very nice. The Premium is more "brisk" and nutty tasting, while the Superfine has a richer mouthfeel and a sweeter, more flowery taste. I like them both a lot, but I think I lean towards the Premium, since I prefer Longjing with that roasted chestnut-y flavor. The standard grade Longjing is really good too, way better than anything you'll get in a store here in Canada.

As for Teavivre's black teas, I think the winner from this year's harvest is the Bailin Gongfu. I find that I prefer black teas without a lot of golden tips, or pekoe, or whatever you call that stuff.

hope and vaseline
Feb 13, 2001



Juaguocio posted:

I've been having a lot of fun comparing Teavivre's different grades of Longjing. I don't have any of the really expensive ones, but the Premium and Superfine are both very nice. The Premium is more "brisk" and nutty tasting, while the Superfine has a richer mouthfeel and a sweeter, more flowery taste. I like them both a lot, but I think I lean towards the Premium, since I prefer Longjing with that roasted chestnut-y flavor. The standard grade Longjing is really good too, way better than anything you'll get in a store here in Canada.

As for Teavivre's black teas, I think the winner from this year's harvest is the Bailin Gongfu. I find that I prefer black teas without a lot of golden tips, or pekoe, or whatever you call that stuff.

I def prefer their premium also. You don't often get that nutty feeling as a tasting note very often with most teas.

Schneider Heim
Oct 17, 2012


Does black tea not lend itself to multiple steepings well? I bought some Turkish black and the leaves are tiny to my previous ones (Chinese green chun mee), and the second steeping yielded a lot less color. Or maybe I needed to add more leaves, but hmm

Cymbal Monkey
Apr 16, 2009

Lift Your Little Paws Like Antennas to Heaven!


Schneider Heim posted:

Does black tea not lend itself to multiple steepings well? I bought some Turkish black and the leaves are tiny to my previous ones (Chinese green chun mee), and the second steeping yielded a lot less color. Or maybe I needed to add more leaves, but hmm

Turkish tea is (technically speaking) trash. The leaves are small and broken to bit and generally very low grade. They'll steep fully in very short order and go bitter before you know it. Better Chinese blacks can be steeped 8 or 9 times and still be very enjoyable. I'm not making GBS threads on you for enjoying Turkish tea, mind, but the leaves are very low quality and won't hold up like high grade leaves will.

Schneider Heim
Oct 17, 2012


Cymbal Monkey posted:

Turkish tea is (technically speaking) trash. The leaves are small and broken to bit and generally very low grade. They'll steep fully in very short order and go bitter before you know it. Better Chinese blacks can be steeped 8 or 9 times and still be very enjoyable. I'm not making GBS threads on you for enjoying Turkish tea, mind, but the leaves are very low quality and won't hold up like high grade leaves will.

That's fine. I like the strong taste. I'll probably use a coffee press instead of my huge teapot to save on stuff. I'm just trying out different teas as this is my second loose-leaf one.

Mr. Squishy
Mar 22, 2010

A country where you can always get richer.

I never understood not using things for their intended purpose, but if you do use a cafetierre for your tea, don't crush down the leaves if you do use the plunger.

hope and vaseline
Feb 13, 2001



Cymbal Monkey posted:

Turkish tea is (technically speaking) trash. The leaves are small and broken to bit and generally very low grade. They'll steep fully in very short order and go bitter before you know it. Better Chinese blacks can be steeped 8 or 9 times and still be very enjoyable. I'm not making GBS threads on you for enjoying Turkish tea, mind, but the leaves are very low quality and won't hold up like high grade leaves will.

It's also because traditional Turkish tea is prepared Russian style with a Samovar and involves making a strong tea concentrate (Zavarka).

RobotDogPolice
Dec 1, 2016


I thought it would be fun to host a tea party. I basically just want to brew a few different flavors and make some little sandwiches and pastries.

What are some essential teas for a nice variety of flavors? Mostly just looking for a few teas that would have noticeably different flavors and smells.

Booyah-
Dec 21, 2004



RobotDogPolice posted:

I thought it would be fun to host a tea party. I basically just want to brew a few different flavors and make some little sandwiches and pastries.

What are some essential teas for a nice variety of flavors? Mostly just looking for a few teas that would have noticeably different flavors and smells.

Did you want to stick to a particular type of tea, like black or green? Assam and Ceylon taste different within black teas but not as different as ones would from the next category up.

Jhet
Jun 3, 2013


RobotDogPolice posted:

I thought it would be fun to host a tea party. I basically just want to brew a few different flavors and make some little sandwiches and pastries.

What are some essential teas for a nice variety of flavors? Mostly just looking for a few teas that would have noticeably different flavors and smells.

What's your audience? People with no knowledge or experience with growing regions won't have any idea yet. I'd go with teas that will make them feel smart because they've heard of them. Something like a good longjing (dragonwell), a low astringency Darjeeling, and then wrap up with a strong black blend or Earl Grey.

People who have more than the experience of putting a tea bag into a cup will enjoy a lot more. You can go down the rabbit hole of matching teas to your food choices, but probably start with a green (lots of Chinese greens to choose from), an oolong (greener or roastier), and a nice straight black tea (I'm partial to Ceylon and Autumnal flush Darjeeling). You can go down the puerh route as well, or an earthier black variety as well. Or there's always the Lapsang Souchong route, but serve it last as it will not leave much room to taste other more subtle teas.

Molten Llama
Sep 20, 2006


Jhet posted:

Or there's always the Lapsang Souchong route, but serve it last as it will not leave much room to taste other more subtle teas.

Truth. My partner loves him some lapsang, and always ordered it when we'd hit the tea shop. As his first pot. Which he always immediately regretted, as everything else tasted like a smokey, piney, flat version of whatever it was supposed to be.

But seriously, if you want to blow some minds, lapsang is both polarizing and mind-blowing. And there are varying smokinesses available if your tea party friends are not, say, Laphroaig drinkers.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

RobotDogPolice
Dec 1, 2016


Thanks for the suggestions guys! I got a longjing today and I really like it so far. I love the way the leaves smell after being steeped.

RobotDogPolice fucked around with this message at Jan 12, 2018 around 09:26

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«80 »