Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
  • Post
  • Reply
NihilCredo
Jun 6, 2011

iram omni possibili modo preme:
plus una illa te diffamabit, quam multæ virtutes commendabunt



axolotl farmer posted:

Most sugar sold in Europe is made from sugar beets, which is just a variety of the same species as beet root. It's chemically identical to cane sugar.
Wait, what? When I see cane sugar in stores (or in small packets in coffee bars), it's brown, coarser, and has a noticeably different taste from regular white beet sugar.

I can figure the 'coarser' part, but is the rest also merely a deliberate choice in the refining process, i.e. unrelated to the plant used?

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

NihilCredo
Jun 6, 2011

iram omni possibili modo preme:
plus una illa te diffamabit, quam multæ virtutes commendabunt



It should be added that pu-erh tea is good for many brewings, and the later ones lose much of the barnyard smell and taste while still packing quite a bit of punch.

That said, if your reaction to a first-brew pu-erh is less "Huh. Odd taste." than "EWWWW WHAT THE gently caress", you're unlikely to love the later ones.

NihilCredo
Jun 6, 2011

iram omni possibili modo preme:
plus una illa te diffamabit, quam multæ virtutes commendabunt



The physical process is actually somehow different, I think it ends up causing uneven temperature through the body of water.

Empirically, all I know is that one morning I microwaved the water directly in the cup, then dropped a few leaves in the cup, and the water/leaves mixture immediately BURST OUT and spilled all over the table. Since then I've always remembered to either pour the water from a separate container or to stir the water first before putting the leaves in.

NihilCredo
Jun 6, 2011

iram omni possibili modo preme:
plus una illa te diffamabit, quam multæ virtutes commendabunt



This is the first time I hear of anise hyssop, I guess because it's an American native herb. What does it taste like? Wiki says it's not actually related to anise or hyssop.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply