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Mandalay
Mar 16, 2007

WoW Forums Refugee

pork never goes bad posted:

Tonight my fiancee and I are celebrating her birthday privately. Tomorrow we go out with friends for cocktails, so no wine then, but tonight we are drinking lots of nice wine!!! Well, by lots I mean 2 bottles. Here they are.......

How much did these cost?

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Kaji
Oct 30, 2002

The Crossdressing Cop with the .45

While cleaning out an uncle's storage unit who let me have everything as long as I cleaned it. I discovered a few bottles of 30 year old wine. I am not a wine drinker so I would like to know if it's really worth what it says on Wine-Searcher. What can I do with it? Is it legal to sell it?


1986 Chateau Leoville-Las-Cases 'Grand Vin de Leoville du Marquis de Las Cases', Saint-Julien, France.


1986 Ridge Vineyards Monte Bello Cabernet Sauvignon, Santa Cruz Mountains, USA


1979 The Monterey Vineyard Classic California Dry White (found nothing on this)

Kaji fucked around with this message at Oct 24, 2011 around 17:17

pork never goes bad
May 16, 2008

gin&milk!!!


Mandalay posted:

How much did these cost?

The Unti is around $24. The Touraine cost me $12. If you want to try either, you could order the Unti online from the winery, the Touraine is available to order at Wine House. And if you want a slightly cheaper thing that will taste somewhat similar Trader Joe's has a Muscadet sur-lie for $6 which is pretty good (especially for the price!)

Subtlet
Jun 10, 2004
You say that all the time

Kaji posted:

While cleaning out an uncle's storage unit who let me have everything as long as I cleaned it. I discovered a few bottles of 30 year old wine. I am not a wine drinker so I would like to know if it's really worth what it says on Wine-Searcher. What can I do with it? Is it legal to sell it?


1986 Chateau Leoville-Las-Cases 'Grand Vin de Leoville du Marquis de Las Cases', Saint-Julien, France.


1986 Ridge Vineyards Monte Bello Cabernet Sauvignon, Santa Cruz Mountains, USA


1979 The Monterey Vineyard Classic California Dry White (found nothing on this)


Here are my thoughts:


Wine Searcher is usually reasonably accurate. Like anything collectible though, that usually represents sales by dealers. Since the law surrounding alcohol sales is different in every state, selling things can be tricky.

The first two are certainly well regarded wines, and they've probably got some value. The biggest problem here is that I'm guessing that this storage area wasn't climate controlled. In the worst case, if it's been sitting through seasonal temp swings in a sealed aluminum box for 30 years, the wine is ruined, and you've got novelty bottles. Even under ideal storage conditions, the white wine is probably toast. (Although I don't know the producer either, I may be wrong.) If it was climate controlled, but not really a professional wine storage facility, there's still substantial risk that the wine is dead. If you're unsure of the storage quality, you're going to have a real hard time moving it through any sort of normal auction or retail channel.

My advice is to ask your uncle about how it was stored. My assumption is that the history is probably pretty sketchy. Of course, this means that none of it is terribly valuable, but it's still not necessarily garbage either. If you have any friends that are into wine, just be honest about where you got them, and see if they're willing to trade you for something you value. Some shops may still be willing to pay you at a huge mark down too.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Had kind of a belated birthday dinner this weekend at the home of an old family friend who introduced me to wine back in the 90s.

Started out with a 1998 Lenoble Blanc de Noirs...
Then an Amontillado....
Next was a 1998 Trimbach Pinot Gris in a magnum, which looks absolutely ridiculous...
1995 S. Anderson Cab Sav from Napa, and then...

Mike surprised me with something I've never had: a wine from my birth year, the 1976 Faiveley Morey-Saint-Denis.

Yes, the bottle had survived 35 years, and yes, it was amazing. I've had older wines, and I've had a few from the late 70s, but getting to hit that 1976 was something I finally got to check off my (spit) bucket list.

Photos of the food and bottles and more notes

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter


I've had the 1986 Ridge Zinfandel from Geyserville as part of a vertical. 1984 was gone, but 1985-1989 were great. If there was any sort of climate control, this is your best bet.

I agree with Subtlet; trade with a friend who can let you know if they're any good, or see if you can attend a local wine event where people in the know can evaluate them. You're probably not going to be able to sell them. Laws vary by state, but the biggest issue is the storage situation. Without any knowledge of the temperature (and swings), it's not a good gamble if real money is involved. Sometimes people setting up a home bar like a few novelty bottles for decoration.

(If you're crafty, attach a pump and spigot to the white wine bottle and fill it with a golden dish soap. Nonchalantly explain to guests that you wash your dishes with 32 year old wine. A friend of mine does this with old Sauternes bottles.)

You can probably sell the empty bottles and corks on eBay or elsewhere, so be careful not to spill any drops on the label while pouring (or dumping). You can either sell to a collector or to an unscrupulous fraudster who will refill the bottle, recork it, and try and sell it to an easy mark. I'm not advising the latter, who will surely burn in hell, but there is a big market out there for empty old wine bottles in good condition.

pork never goes bad
May 16, 2008

gin&milk!!!


idiotsavant, I got a bottle of Antoine Arena's Patrimonio


Thanks for rec, hope it's good!!


EDIT Just saw that you said the 2006, and said it was about $18... This definitely wasn't $18, but the guy at the store raved about it. He also said it was drinking well now, so I will probably not lay this down for 4 years.

Also, Benito, just read your blog post about your 3rd birthday dinner - that sounds like a lot of fun

pork never goes bad fucked around with this message at Oct 26, 2011 around 01:59

idiotsavant
Jun 4, 2000

"I don't care!"

Yeah, I think I remember the latest release being priced significantly higher. I've had one of his reds as well, and it was very nice - distinctive and earthy and complex. It was a funny experience, because the earthiness was very similar to the earthiness in the wines of the winemaker I'm working with, and when we drank the Arena at dinner we were all teasing him about it.

Feenix
Mar 14, 2003
Sorry, guy.


I had a MOST delicious wine last night. As no stranger to wine, I like all types of things, but it struck me this would be a GREAT wine to pour for someone just getting into reds, or a little put off by the more intense reds.

Grizzly Republic Gypsy Noir Paso Robles Red 2008.

Yes, it's a mouthful.

It's 14.4 alc but it is one of the least "hot" wines I've ever drank. Very fruity with lots of jam.

It's got a bunch of grapes in it. Mourvedre, Syrah, P. Sirah, Cinsault, etc...

It's SO good. An easy drinking, (but very pedigreed) experience.


A blurb from Lot18 about the winemaker:

Who’s Brian Cheeseborough? While many top American wineries brag about their imported French winemakers, this American was actually poached from the Golden State and handed the reins of some of Bordeaux’s hottest estates. Châteaus Haut-Bergey, Branon, Barde-Haut and Clos l’Église fill his résumé. Yes, this is the Château Clos l’Église that was awarded 96-100 points by Robert Parker for the 2009 vintage, and, yes, Cheeseborough was the winemaker. To boot, he’s also making wine at Bodegas Poesia in Argentina. Give this guy grapes from anywhere, and he’ll undoubtedly do something incredible.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

pork never goes bad posted:

Also, Benito, just read your blog post about your 3rd birthday dinner - that sounds like a lot of fun

Thanks! It was pretty cool, and since I'm usually the one providing the wines and cooking the food it was fun to take a back seat for a moment. I also got to try an English gin flavored with the fruit of the baobab tree and a Kentucky all-wheat whiskey. There was a 15 year old Scotch at the very end but I was pretty much carried out of the house clutching the empty '76 and that monstrous Alsatian magnum.

For those who are interested in the life of the wineblogger (and I'm not trying to overstate the importance of my simple hobby), this is the time of year when things get insane. Usually the samples start heavily flowing in around late October for "the perfect wine for Thanksgiving", closely followed by your perfect Christmas and New Year's wines. This year things have started early with Halloween themed wines, or anything that might possibly be connected to something spooky or mystical. I've even gotten wines based around a push for Arbor Day.

Molybdenum
Jun 24, 2007
Melting Point ~2622C

Catawba Wine

by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

This song of mine
Is a Song of the Vine,
To be sung by the glowing embers
Of wayside inns,
When the rain begins
To darken the drear Novembers.

It is not a song
Of the Scuppernong,
From warm Carolinian valleys,
Nor the Isabel
And the Muscadel
That bask in our garden alleys.

Nor the red Mustang,
Whose clusters hang
O'er the waves of the Colorado,
And the fiery flood
Of whose purple blood
Has a dash of Spanish bravado.

For richest and best
Is the wine of the West,
That grows by the Beautiful River;
Whose sweet perfume
Fills all the room
With a benison on the giver.

And as hollow trees
Are the haunts of bees,
For ever going and coming;
So this crystal hive
Is all alive
With a swarming and buzzing and humming.

Very good in its way
Is the Verzenay,
Or the Sillery soft and creamy;
But Catawba wine
Has a taste more divine,
More dulcet, delicious, and dreamy.

There grows no vine
By the haunted Rhine,
By Danube or Guadalquivir,
Nor on island or cape,
That bears such a grape
As grows by the Beautiful River.

Drugged is their juice
For foreign use,
When shipped o'er the reeling Atlantic,
To rack our brains
With the fever pains,
That have driven the Old World frantic.

To the sewers and sinks
With all such drinks,
And after them tumble the mixer;
For a poison malign
Is such Borgia wine,
Or at best but a Devil's Elixir.

While pure as a spring
Is the wine I sing,
And to praise it, one needs but name it;
For Catawba wine
Has need of no sign,
No tavern-bush to proclaim it.

And this Song of the Vine,
This greeting of mine,
The winds and the birds shall deliver
To the Queen of the West,
In her garlands dressed,
On the banks of the Beautiful River.



Southwest Ohio used to be big winemaking country, and the principal grape used was the Catawba.

from the Catawba wikipedia page:

quote:

The year 1859 was Catawba's peak in the Ohio wine industry, with the state being the largest producer in the United States, producing more than 568,000 US gallons (2,150 kL) of wine from 2,000 acres (800 ha) acres of mostly Catawba vines.

There are still a few vineyards around Cincinnati, the most prominent is probably Valley Vineyards in Morrow. Their wines are sold in Kroger stores, usually from 8 to 14 at Kroger. they sell a larger variety in local wineshops or at the vineyard, but of course the prices are higher there. My favorite of their's is probably the Hillside Red or the Cabernet Sauvignon. I like mostly dry red wines and these fit the bill. VV also makes a honey mead and a port. I like the port as a dessert but I don't like honey so I haven't tried the mead.

I'm interested to hear about other wine regions or vineyards that are maybe overlooked nowadays or haven't found a broad audience yet. Anything near you?

Joe Friday
Oct 15, 2007

Just the facts, ma'am.

Molybdenum posted:

Catawba Wine

This and dandelion wine are still very popular in my rural part of Ohio. I grab a bottle of each every time I visit home. Most of the wines made in my area are tooth-achingly sweet fruit wines or German-style wines. I mostly skip those. Catawba grapes are still grown in abundance around the Western park of Lake Erie as well.

In Washington there are many types of grapes that are grown and although I'm new to appreciating wine beyond its intoxicating and generally tasting good qualities, I really like the pinot noir and syrah I've had up here. I'm anxious to learn more since I now live in an area where most people don't refer to wine as either "sweet" or "sour."

Alexander the Grape
Dec 21, 2006

Ott-tocracy

What I'm drinking today:


Torii Mor Willamette Valley Pinot Noir 2009

I picked up this half-bottle from work (I'm a server at a Californian bistro) at the recommendation of our Somm. Love it! Rich and intense with loads of dark fruit, some earth, mushroom, and spice as well. It's luxuriously silky, with nice acidity. In the finish, I find some black pepper and something I can't put my finger on... mint?

Definitely a fan. While I'm still learning a lot about wine (and my own palate), I already feel myself gravitating towards Pinot Noir. I love the huge variation you get from one region to another: Santa Lucia Highlands, Russian River, Oregon, Burgundy, etc.

I know a few of you are from Oregon; what do others think of this wine?

Subtlet
Jun 10, 2004
You say that all the time

Thanks for posting this note. Torii Mor was one of the first wineries that got me excited when I first got into wine. I still enjoy some of their releases, but I haven't tasted the 2009 yet. Now I'll be keeping my eyes open for one.

pork never goes bad
May 16, 2008

gin&milk!!!


I have never felt like I got Pinot, as a drinker of lightweight red wines, so perhaps I will try Torii Mor.

Last night I drank this: 2002 Damien Laureau Savennières Le Bel Ouvrage

I'm linking these images because they are awful, but here they are.

The label

The wine was a fairly odd color given that I was expecting a dry Loire white. What I got was clearly something that began as shriveled grapes (stealing a line here). The wine was a dark, almost golden, straw color.

The glass

On the nose initially I got such a sweet honey note that I was expecting something both overwhelmingly sweet, and absolutely one note. Don't get me wrong, I like sweet wine when done right, especially botrytized wine, but I didn't want dessert wine when I drank this. Luckily, what I got on the nose was not at all what I got on the palate, and not at all what the nose evolved into over the next hour or two. When smelling this it's all about honeyed fruit, apricot, sweet apple, ripe citrus aromas. But when you taste it the contrast is astounding. This is all about the minerality, the bracing acidity. This wine smells like honey, but tastes as austere as a nun's arse (tip - it doesn't taste like a nun's arse, you don't want to taste a nun's arse). Towards the end of the bottle I got a lot more complexity out of the nose, with some flowery almost powdery notes that are such a surprise contrasted with the initial aroma.

After all that pretentious twaddle, what is everyone drinking for Thanksgiving? I think I have 2002 Sawyer Merlot and the Antoine Arena Patrimonio I bought on the advice of this thread (thanks idiotsavant ) on my list, looking for 1-2 more plus a dessert wine. I think I may crack open a possibly too young bottle of Topaz Late Harvest that I have, but may go out and get something German. Going to be cooking a roast chicken or turkey perhaps, a joint of beef, a green bean casserole, and then roasted veg and steamed veg. I am allergic to poultry so the meal will be a bit more beefy and heavy than a lot of Thanksgiving dinners, so the wine may lean that way too.

MuffinTop
Apr 4, 2011

goonicorn

Hey'all

I am building a "best of" list of wines for xmas time and I wanted to get some advice from you all about your favorite wines this year. I'm kinda hoping that they are:

A. not incredibly hard to acquire
B. maybe your top 5-6 wines you've put your lips on this year
C. Affordable values > holy poo poo gently caress $$$ wines

I'm not wine retarded, but then again... maybe I am. show me the light

MuffinTop
Apr 4, 2011

goonicorn

Alexander the Grape posted:

What I'm drinking today:

Torii Mor Willamette Valley Pinot Noir 2009

I know a few of you are from Oregon; what do others think of this wine?

I live in Seattle and I've had Torii Mor and a bunch of other pinots from OR. I like Torii Mor okay, but in the same range I like these dogs a tiny bit more:

2008 Lachini Pinot Noir Estate Lachini Vineyard - $27

2009 J. Christopher Pinot Noir - $22

2009 Saint Innocent Willamette Valley Villages Cuvee 2009 Pinot Noir -$28

Daedelus Pinot Noir - $27

I do not like:

Adelsheim, Argyle pinot noir (their sparkling and chardonnay is good though), Patricia Green Cellars...

Stitecin
Feb 6, 2004
Mayor of Stitecinopolis

pork never goes bad posted:

We started with 2010 Unti Cuvee Blanc... It's made up of 48% Grenache Blanc, 45% Vermentino, and 7% Picpoul, and we both liked this very much. It's so loving good. Bracing acidity, and bright fruit. This went down very easily. Unti is in Napa Valley, but the style of wine is very different to the norm for the area. The varieties used in the blend are characteristic of the Mediterranean, particularly southern France. This is the only white wine Unti makes. Does anybody know of varietal Picpoul or Vermentino wine?

Unti is in Dry Creek. If you liked the Cuvee Blanc you should try the Madame Preston from Preston Winery which is almost directly across Dry Creek from Unti. It is similarly Grenache Blanc based, though the rest is Viognier, Marsanne, and Roussanne. Preston also occasionally does varietal bottlings of the components. For Picpoul and Vermintino check out Tablas Creek (http://tablascreek.com/picpoul10.shtml) & (http://tablascreek.com/vermentino10.shtml.) You'll have more luck around Paso Robles in general. Also you can get varietal Picpoul from Langueduc for cheap if you look around. Here's one for $7 http://www.amitywines.com/vsku1316982.html

idiotsavant
Jun 4, 2000

"I don't care!"

As I posted earlier, Antoine Arena in Corsica does Vermentino; he's imported by Kermit Lynch. I'd check out the Lynch portfolio for Picpoul as well, and especially for Languedoc-Rousillon blends that contain either or both grapes.

gay picnic defence
Oct 5, 2009

If you saw Atlas, the giant who holds the world on his shoulders, if you saw that he stood, blood running down his chest, his knees buckling, and the greater his effort the heavier the world bore down upon his shoulders - What would you tell him?

To Shrug.

drunk abuot $700 of wine tonight dnot remembermuch but it tasted pretty fukcen good

pork never goes bad
May 16, 2008

gin&milk!!!


idiotsavant posted:

As I posted earlier, Antoine Arena in Corsica does Vermentino; he's imported by Kermit Lynch. I'd check out the Lynch portfolio for Picpoul as well, and especially for Languedoc-Rousillon blends that contain either or both grapes.

Thanks Stitecin, idiotsavant. I did buy a bottle of Antoine Arena's Vermentino from KL, and have a few bottles of Picpoul de Pinet waiting at K&L for me. Funnily enough, I read Tablas Creek's pages on the grapes when I initially asked about them, but never bit the bullet and bought a bottle.

Dangphat
Nov 15, 2011


I shared a bottle of this with my girl friend as an accompaniment to a chicken,pancetta and hard goats cheese creamy pasta dish.

The wine matched up well to some of the stronger flavors of the pancetta and cut through creamyness of the sauce. Very drinkable but a little bit one dimensional, but I suppose this is always a risk with semillon.

edit: 2005 vintage

idiotsavant
Jun 4, 2000

"I don't care!"

pork never goes bad posted:

Thanks Stitecin, idiotsavant. I did buy a bottle of Antoine Arena's Vermentino from KL, and have a few bottles of Picpoul de Pinet waiting at K&L for me. Funnily enough, I read Tablas Creek's pages on the grapes when I initially asked about them, but never bit the bullet and bought a bottle.

Disclaimer 'cause I'm working harvest with them, but I think you'd really like Clos Saron. Tiny (600-800 cases/yr) Foothills winery with some amazing Syrah blends and a really nice Pinot that hews much closer to Old World style - more austere, nice acidity, and very, very ageable. If you're in the East Bay you can find them at Solano Cellars and their various offshoots, and if you're in SF they're at Terroir, Arlequin, and Cal-Mart by the park.

Try to find a bottle of the 2010 Out of the Blue if you can - it's 130-yo Lodi Cinsault vines with a little bit of Foothills Syrah mixed in, and it's fun as hell to drink. Light, happy, great acidity; it's a killer food wine. Terroir might still have some, not sure about the other spots.

pork never goes bad
May 16, 2008

gin&milk!!!


I love the few Clos Saron wines I have tried. There are a few places that have some of their bottles. I've not tried their Pinot as I tend to dislike Pinot as compared to, well, most other red grapes. I have tried a Syrah rose, as well as a Syrah/Cinsault(?) blend. Same wine, different vintages. I also tried a white they made. ETA - that's awesome that you are working Harvest with them, by the way. One day, I would like to do something like that, but work intrudes.

Keyser_Soze
May 5, 2009



Since Thanksgiving is next week do you winegoons have any recommendations for an obtainable $20-$40 Champagne/Sparkling wine that isn't VC or White Star?

Gosset?
Laurent-Perrier?
Bruno Michel?

I want to try something new.

https://www.klwines.com/content.asp...ySoldLast30%7C1

I might just grab a Perrier-Jouët again since I had it last year and really liked it.

Keyser_Soze fucked around with this message at Nov 18, 2011 around 19:21

consensual poster
Sep 1, 2009



Keyser S0ze posted:

Since Thanksgiving is next week do you winegoons have any recommendations for an obtainable $20-$40 Champagne/Sparkling wine that isn't VC or White Star?

Gosset?
Laurent-Perrier?
Bruno Michel?

I want to try something new.

https://www.klwines.com/content.asp...ySoldLast30%7C1

I might just grab a Perrier-Jouët again since I had it last year and really liked it.

Perrier-Jouët is a good choice. I've also enjoyed the Charles Heidsieck, Henriot, and Billecart-Salmon (especially). The Billecart-Salmon in particular is a really good wine to have with food.

I would stay away from the inexpensive Gosset. The only time I had it, I thought it sucked.

pork never goes bad
May 16, 2008

gin&milk!!!


http://www.klwines.com/detail.asp?sku=1068745

This is incredible for the price.

Keyser_Soze
May 5, 2009



pork never goes bad posted:

http://www.klwines.com/detail.asp?sku=1068745

This is incredible for the price.

Well, the only way to settle this is to get one of each....and what the hell get some reds too. Done!

2005 Huet Cuvee Huet Vouvray Petillant Sec $29.99
Perrier-Jouët "Grand Brut" Champagne $39.99
2006 Bodegas LAN Crianza Rioja $9.99
2009 Castillo de Monseran Garnacha Cariñena $6.99
2007 Campo Viejo Tempranillo Crianza Rioja $10.99
2005 d'Aiguilhe, Côtes de Castillon $35.99

idiotsavant
Jun 4, 2000

"I don't care!"

pork never goes bad posted:

I love the few Clos Saron wines I have tried. There are a few places that have some of their bottles. I've not tried their Pinot as I tend to dislike Pinot as compared to, well, most other red grapes. I have tried a Syrah rose, as well as a Syrah/Cinsault(?) blend. Same wine, different vintages. I also tried a white they made. ETA - that's awesome that you are working Harvest with them, by the way. One day, I would like to do something like that, but work intrudes.

The Cinsault/Syrah blend is the one I recommended; it's goddamn delicious. Their roses are really nice, too - we just bottled the 2011 white and rose today, and they're yummy. I've had a few vintages of the rose, and it's kind of amazing to drink a 2005 CA rose out of half-bottles and have it show consistently well. The Syrah-based red blends are a little more serious, but they're also delicious, and when they're out in full form they're magnificent.

Also buy 2005 Huet Petillant but for goodness sake don't drink it now you babykillers!

gay picnic defence
Oct 5, 2009

If you saw Atlas, the giant who holds the world on his shoulders, if you saw that he stood, blood running down his chest, his knees buckling, and the greater his effort the heavier the world bore down upon his shoulders - What would you tell him?

To Shrug.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/br...x-1226196883322
I wouldn't mind trying this but the fact that they're flogging it to China suggests its probably got about 20g/L RS.

Stitecin
Feb 6, 2004
Mayor of Stitecinopolis

4liters posted:

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/br...x-1226196883322
I wouldn't mind trying this but the fact that they're flogging it to China suggests its probably got about 20g/L RS.

I was in the Australia in '08. There was plenty of sugar to hit 16.5% and still leave 20g/L.

gay picnic defence
Oct 5, 2009

If you saw Atlas, the giant who holds the world on his shoulders, if you saw that he stood, blood running down his chest, his knees buckling, and the greater his effort the heavier the world bore down upon his shoulders - What would you tell him?

To Shrug.

Chris Ringland is still at it. We tried a couple of magnums of these truly awful wines with 18.6% alc (this was displayed in a font much large than what is mandatory, suggesting that the fucker was proud of this for some reason) and a fuckload of residual sugar. There was VA galore and one of them just tasted mouldy.


$250/bottle thank you very much.

4/20 NEVER FORGET
Dec 2, 2002

NEVER FORGET OK

Fun Shoe

4liters posted:

drunk abuot $700 of wine tonight dnot remembermuch but it tasted pretty fukcen good

This was me last Thursday night. Big rear end steak dinner with some wine friends, the highlights of the night:

2005 Chateau Carbonnieux blanc
2001 Chateau Pape Clement
1995 Chateau Leoville Las Cases
1989 Chateau Lynch Bages
2005 Chateau Rieussec
2001 Leonetti Cabernet Sauvignon
2003 Peter Micheal 'Esprit des Pavots'

Had a pretty good hangover the next day. It was awesome.

ballgameover.mp3
Oct 21, 2008


Hey, I'm trying to find a thread about making your own wine. I haven't found one, does such a thread exist?

Stitecin
Feb 6, 2004
Mayor of Stitecinopolis

ballgameover.mp3 posted:

Hey, I'm trying to find a thread about making your own wine. I haven't found one, does such a thread exist?

You may be in the right place, on what scale are you talking about making wine? Several of us make wine for a living, but in the last thread a few people asked some home winemaking questions and got rather technical answers.

pork never goes bad
May 16, 2008

gin&milk!!!


4/20 NEVER FORGET posted:

This was me last Thursday night. Big rear end steak dinner with some wine friends, the highlights of the night:

2005 Chateau Carbonnieux blanc
2001 Chateau Pape Clement
1995 Chateau Leoville Las Cases
1989 Chateau Lynch Bages
2005 Chateau Rieussec
2001 Leonetti Cabernet Sauvignon
2003 Peter Micheal 'Esprit des Pavots'

Had a pretty good hangover the next day. It was awesome.

That sounds like a nice night!

ballgameover.mp3
Oct 21, 2008


Stitecin posted:

You may be in the right place, on what scale are you talking about making wine? Several of us make wine for a living, but in the last thread a few people asked some home winemaking questions and got rather technical answers.

Very small scale. This will be my first foray into winemaking, or anything of the sort. I know little to nothing. I live in Olympia, and there's luckily a decent culture of homebrewing, etc. I stopped by Rocky Top Homebrew, and the guy there - Larry, I think - was very friendly, but he said that winemaking wasn't his expertise. What I'd like to do is make a bunch of strawberry wine. I think. I've never had strawberry wine before, but I hear that it's very easy, and ends up tasting pretty drat good.
There's a kit that I'll be purchasing, as I mentioned, (third one here: http://rockytopbrew.com/StarterKits.htm) and I'm just wondering about the process, whether any of you have some helpful tips about things to do or to avoid. Just general info, I guess.

Cpt.Wacky
Apr 17, 2005


We had a mead thread before whirled peas that was mostly focused on making mead. There's a beer thread about drinking beer, and another about making it. This is probably the best place to ask unless you want to start a wine making thread.

I'd say just go for it. I was overwhelmed when I started out with all the terms, methods and warnings about sanitation. Fermentation is a really reliable process.

I had a sort-of wine-making related question. I've been making mead for the last few months, and one guide from MoreWine talks about adding more yeast nutrient after 1/3rd sugar depletion. How can you tell when that is? Do I need to plan my FG and then keep measuring the SG periodically until it's 1/3rd down from the OG?

gay picnic defence
Oct 5, 2009

If you saw Atlas, the giant who holds the world on his shoulders, if you saw that he stood, blood running down his chest, his knees buckling, and the greater his effort the heavier the world bore down upon his shoulders - What would you tell him?

To Shrug.

ballgameover.mp3 posted:

Very small scale. This will be my first foray into winemaking, or anything of the sort. I know little to nothing. I live in Olympia, and there's luckily a decent culture of homebrewing, etc. I stopped by Rocky Top Homebrew, and the guy there - Larry, I think - was very friendly, but he said that winemaking wasn't his expertise. What I'd like to do is make a bunch of strawberry wine. I think. I've never had strawberry wine before, but I hear that it's very easy, and ends up tasting pretty drat good.
There's a kit that I'll be purchasing, as I mentioned, (third one here: http://rockytopbrew.com/StarterKits.htm) and I'm just wondering about the process, whether any of you have some helpful tips about things to do or to avoid. Just general info, I guess.

I dont think there is much juice in strawberries so you'll need a lot of them unless you're just adding them to sugar water. Other than that if you follow the instructions you should be sweet.

Cpt.Wacky posted:

I had a sort-of wine-making related question. I've been making mead for the last few months, and one guide from MoreWine talks about adding more yeast nutrient after 1/3rd sugar depletion. How can you tell when that is? Do I need to plan my FG and then keep measuring the SG periodically until it's 1/3rd down from the OG?

If you are not going to ferment to complete dryness then I'm not sure nutrient is necessary unless your ferment stinks of rotten eggs. If that happens give it a good mix or a shake and add some nutrient.

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ballgameover.mp3
Oct 21, 2008


4liters posted:

I dont think there is much juice in strawberries so you'll need a lot of them unless you're just adding them to sugar water. Other than that if you follow the instructions you should be sweet.

All of the recipes I've seen for strawberry wine so far call for sugar. Is it inherently better to stick with fruits that produce sufficient sugar naturally? I thought it would be good to have something that's a bit tart. Is this a bad idea that will end up mouth-puckeringly sour? I have been kind of set on creating a strawberry wine called My Bloody Valentine, with the album cover to Loveless as a label. I know it is lame, but I thought it might be a fun little thing to present to friends.

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