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Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



pork never goes bad posted:

Can you get wine shipped?

I'm pretty sure WI allows it.

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Ola
Jul 19, 2004



In my subscription search, I came across this link for a free trial with IWC. (Stephen Tanzer's International Wine Cellar) It was posted in 2010 but still works, give it a go if you're interested: http://www.wineaccess.com/expert/ta....html?code=ct10

pork never goes bad
May 16, 2008

gin&milk!!!


Casu Marzu posted:

I'm pretty sure WI allows it.

K&L will ship to WI and have the two in particular I recommended. They also have a pretty good sherry/port selection.

Bual: http://www.klwines.com/detail.asp?sku=1061379
Sercial: http://www.klwines.com/detail.asp?sku=1136709
375ml sherry: http://www.klwines.com/content.asp?...&Ntk=search_all

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Overwined posted:

I think his entry level under the Domaine du Clos de Fees label is called "Les Sorcieres". Again, this is a Cotes de Rousillon. But look for Walden too. It's a great value wine.

EDIT: The US importer is Domaine Select Wine Estates. Giving importer info to retailers really helps them track wines down. I know because I did retail for too many years!

Had a bottle of Domaine de la Chique last night and holy hell. I've bought a lot of wine that wasn't half as good for twice the price.

pork never goes bad
May 16, 2008

gin&milk!!!


I mentioned almost a year ago that I had been enjoying some of Lyle Fass's wines from his new import mailing list business. Tonight I'm drinking a St Aubin rouge from a natural producer in Burgundy, Jean-Jacques Morel. It's really bloody good! Lyle's prose is, well, florid, but in this case I'm very much on board with the enthusiasm. Quite but not religiously naturally made wines from a relatively less appreciated appellation. There's plenty of acidity, but it comes across more as juicy than as sharp. Gobs of red fruit, and some great secondary characteristics are showing up. Perhaps a touch too much wood for me, but it's really well done, and I'm never much of a fan of newer oak. Really hate the notion of scoring or grading wines, but this deserves a pretty high mark however you represent it.

Crimson
Nov 6, 2002


2011 Dow's Vintage Port the Wine Spectator Wine of the Year, and 3 Portuguese wines in the top 5. Of course as a somm I'm contractually obligated to not give a flying gently caress about Spectator or scores in general but I'd be curious to hear your guys' thoughts on that, especially since it's very relevant for you guys in the retail world. I for one think it's absolutely ridiculous and reeks of marketing tie in, given slumping interest and sales in Port wine, and general disinterest and lack of knowledge in vintage Port in particular. The fact that I have an open and running supply of 1985 Dow's by the glass and says to me that supply is greater than demand.

Ominous Balls
Apr 8, 2009


himajinga posted:

Awesome, what clued me in was that I've tasted other vintages of that Merlot before and they didn't taste anything like the 2008, and I've seen it on discount at a few places so I thought maybe it's "flawed", but it just turns out that it's a flaw I like in small amounts haha. Thanks for the tip!

If you like wild yeast, and natural winemaking, Fabien Jouves is making second label stuff for Mas del Perie, and there is definitely Brett, and a bunch of other cool things happening in his wine. Growing Cab Franc in Cahors, and blending it 50/50 with Malbec, because he just DGAF. Tu Vin Plus Aux Soirees is the one, 2012 or 13.


Olivier Cousin; Pur Breton is fantastic. Natural wine from the Loire. 100% Cab Franc, wild yeast, absolutely un-messed with wine. 2012 or 13.

Both are around $20.

We just tasted some really meaty Aglianico this week. 2005 "Nude" from Cantina Giardano. Natural yeast, unfiltered, and perfect with slices of Iberico ham and salt cured olives. That one is probably harder to find, since I think the distributor that showed it to us is still trying to find placement for it in the states.

Ominous Balls fucked around with this message at Nov 16, 2014 around 01:01

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


Crimson posted:

2011 Dow's Vintage Port the Wine Spectator Wine of the Year, and 3 Portuguese wines in the top 5. Of course as a somm I'm contractually obligated to not give a flying gently caress about Spectator or scores in general but I'd be curious to hear your guys' thoughts on that, especially since it's very relevant for you guys in the retail world. I for one think it's absolutely ridiculous and reeks of marketing tie in, given slumping interest and sales in Port wine, and general disinterest and lack of knowledge in vintage Port in particular. The fact that I have an open and running supply of 1985 Dow's by the glass and says to me that supply is greater than demand.

Isn't this just SOP? The idea of choosing The One Best Wine In The World is so absurd it can't be anything but a marketing ploy. It's definitely great timing for them though, what with 2011 being The Vintage Of The Millenium and the unfortified Douro reds becoming so popular lately. While Port isn't exactly the hottest ticket in town right now, it's goes for super luxury prices compared to other fortifieds, 'round here and you can't find a 2011 anything for less than $50, and the decent stuff starts at $80 and going fast. And I can't figure out who's buying those $80 Douro reds but somebody is.

Samswing
Jan 8, 2009



Ominous Balls posted:


Olivier Cousin; Pur Breton is fantastic. Natural wine from the Loire. 100% Cab Franc, wild yeast, absolutely un-messed with wine. 2012 or 13


Glad to see this wine getting some love, It really is a awesome bottle for that price point and I was pissed to see that my old store stopped carrying it.

Does anyone have any suggestions for a decent Priorat? I've been really digging Clos del Portal Gotes del Priorat, but again, my local guy is having trouble getting it in and I figured it was time to branch out to some others.

Samswing fucked around with this message at Nov 16, 2014 around 03:40

himajinga
Mar 19, 2003

Und wenn du lange in einen Schuh blickst, blickt der Schuh auch in dich hinein.


Ominous Balls posted:

If you like wild yeast, and natural winemaking, Fabien Jouves is making second label stuff for Mas del Perie, and there is definitely Brett, and a bunch of other cool things happening in his wine. Growing Cab Franc in Cahors, and blending it 50/50 with Malbec, because he just DGAF. Tu Vin Plus Aux Soirees is the one, 2012 or 13.


Olivier Cousin; Pur Breton is fantastic. Natural wine from the Loire. 100% Cab Franc, wild yeast, absolutely un-messed with wine. 2012 or 13.

Both are around $20.

We just tasted some really meaty Aglianico this week. 2005 "Nude" from Cantina Giardano. Natural yeast, unfiltered, and perfect with slices of Iberico ham and salt cured olives. That one is probably harder to find, since I think the distributor that showed it to us is still trying to find placement for it in the states.

Thanks for the tip, I'll have to check those out if I can get a hold of them, and a nice price too

Stitecin
Feb 6, 2004
Mayor of Stitecinopolis

The annual Thanksgiving wine tips rush should keep this thread on the first page of GWS for the next week.

Does anyone have any particularly hot tips to offer beyond "buy a lot of Beaujolais"?

pork never goes bad
May 16, 2008

gin&milk!!!


Dry rose. Also bubbles. Beaujolais is the right answer, though... I'll be drinking Metras Fleurie and hopefully some rose pet nat from Quentin Bourse so I guess I'm hitting all three of my recommendations.

himajinga
Mar 19, 2003

Und wenn du lange in einen Schuh blickst, blickt der Schuh auch in dich hinein.


Had the 2013 Syncline Rose a while back and thought it was fine, but had a bottle with tapas recently and holy hell it's a great food rose. Worth checking out if you come across it.

Ola
Jul 19, 2004



A wine pairing fact: When in doubt, champagne.

Speaking of bubbles, here is some good photographic evidence of the bottle caps used during secondary fermentation (which takes place in bottle).



This isn't a wine actually, it's an apple cider from western Norway, hence the rusty patina.

benito
Sep 28, 2004

And I don't blab
any drab gab--
I chatter hep patter

Stitecin posted:

The annual Thanksgiving wine tips rush should keep this thread on the first page of GWS for the next week.

Does anyone have any particularly hot tips to offer beyond "buy a lot of Beaujolais"?

Skip the Nouveau, go with Cru. The price isn't that different and you'll have a much better experience. I skipped the Bojo Novo this year.

I've got an article coming out in the next day or two about "Best First Time Wines for Thanksgiving", about how a lot of times you're serving wine to family members who either never or rarely drink wine, and it's generally not a time when you're breaking out the notebook and taking detailed tasting notes. Maybe it's a 16 year old cousin who's allowed to have a sip or the Great Aunt who decides to be adventurous but who you don't want to get drunk. Go mild, go lower alcohol, don't break out the special bottles unless you're around like minded folks and want to talk about and analyze the wine, etc.

My hands down favorite for that first time wine drinker is Vinho Verde, specifically the 9% alcohol, $9, light and slightly fizzy wine. (Lots of variety in the region in terms of reds and rosÚs and whatnot, but not a lot of that makes it to the US.) It's a little sweet but fun, and it's not going to scare anyone off. They like that, move up to the cheap Cava you've brought along, then bring in the mild Riesling. I'll post the link when it goes live.

Zeno-25
Dec 5, 2009



Stitecin posted:

The annual Thanksgiving wine tips rush should keep this thread on the first page of GWS for the next week.

Does anyone have any particularly hot tips to offer beyond "buy a lot of Beaujolais"?

I guess you could get a Beaujolais Nouveau if you're buying for people that don't like good wine. With my family, I like to pick up some reserve bottles of Malbec or Carmenere to go with the food since most like/prefer reds.

Beaujolais Nouveau

Zeno-25 fucked around with this message at Nov 23, 2014 around 01:33

Stitecin
Feb 6, 2004
Mayor of Stitecinopolis

Zeno-25 posted:

I guess you could get a Beaujolais Nouveau if you're buying for people that don't like good wine...
Beaujolais Nouveau

Ok now I feel like I have to defend myself. In what world does Beaujolais not imply Cru Beaujolais? No one who cares the least bit about wine should hear Beaujolais and think Nouveau.

Crimson
Nov 6, 2002


Hitting up Paso Robles for the next few days. Anyone been there and know any smaller gems? I've already got Halter Ranch, Ambyth and Tablas Creek down. The Ambyth wines are outrageously tasty by the way. That Grenache would make for some good Thanksgiving drinking.

Stitecin
Feb 6, 2004
Mayor of Stitecinopolis

Crimson posted:

Hitting up Paso Robles for the next few days. Anyone been there and know any smaller gems? I've already got Halter Ranch, Ambyth and Tablas Creek down. The Ambyth wines are outrageously tasty by the way. That Grenache would make for some good Thanksgiving drinking.

I liked Villa Creek and Adelaida. It's an hour and a half from Paso but Demetria in Santa Ynez is also great.

pork never goes bad
May 16, 2008

gin&milk!!!


Stitecin posted:

Ok now I feel like I have to defend myself. In what world does Beaujolais not imply Cru Beaujolais? No one who cares the least bit about wine should hear Beaujolais and think Nouveau.

"reserve bottles of Malbec or Carmenere"

Stitecin
Feb 6, 2004
Mayor of Stitecinopolis

Zeno-25 (via pork never goes bad) posted:

"reserve bottles of Malbec or Carmenere"

Yeah, I didn't take issue with that part; Zeno-25 knows his/her family a lot better than I do. Maybe those are perfect pairings for the food on their table.

Dry rose. Also bubbles. Beaujolais is the right answer... -- The goony wine thread

Overwined
Sep 22, 2008

Wine can of their wits the wise beguile,
Make the sage frolic, and the serious smile.


I honestly think anything from Burgundy is appropriate. But they again, Thanksgiving pairings are a lot easier than they sound. This is mostly because there's simply too wide a variety of foods on the table for the perfect pairing. So anything medium-bodied (I guess the classical definition of medium-bodied) will work.

I always crack an older Riesling if I have one handy. I love rose bubbles as most of you do as well. Ummm, no offense to the fam, but I usually veer towards rose Cremant de Bourgogne. Save the Champagne for when I've gotten a raise or when I'm getting laid.

Italy has a few things to offer here as well. A Nebbiolo d'Alba that's on the lighter side works great with the root vegetables even if tramples the turkey a bit. Last year I pulled a cork on a very lovely Schioppettino. Everyone in my family hated it, but I drank it down and thought it did very well.

I also think Mencia has something to offer as long as you stay to the prettier, more structured ones.

Pretty Boy Floyd
Mar 21, 2006
If you'll gather round me children...

Bubbles + rose in one perfect package: Roederer Estate Brut Rose. Perhaps my favorite thing to drink on this planet.

Crimson
Nov 6, 2002


Taking my first crack at the Master Sommelier exam on March 2nd, wish me luck guys. Maybe sacrifice a virgin or two in my name, I'll need all the help I can get. Crazy, I've been posting in this thread since before I passed the Certified Exam.

Biomute
Jun 7, 2005


I often see pictures where people have dining tables in their wine cellars and use them as dining rooms for parties etc. Won't that be uncomfortably cold? And will not the temperature variations caused by people walking in and out and serving warm food in there defeat the purpose of a wine cellar?

Overwined
Sep 22, 2008

Wine can of their wits the wise beguile,
Make the sage frolic, and the serious smile.


Crimson posted:

Taking my first crack at the Master Sommelier exam on March 2nd, wish me luck guys. Maybe sacrifice a virgin or two in my name, I'll need all the help I can get. Crazy, I've been posting in this thread since before I passed the Certified Exam.

That's quite awesome. The AS in and of itself is an amazing accomplishment to be revered. I wish you the best on your MS. Out of curiosity, how much time per week are you devoting to study? Do you talk to your sponsor much?

Biomute posted:

I often see pictures where people have dining tables in their wine cellars and use them as dining rooms for parties etc. Won't that be uncomfortably cold? And will not the temperature variations caused by people walking in and out and serving warm food in there defeat the purpose of a wine cellar?

All liquids change temperature quite slowly and wine has the additional insulative buffer of glass. As long as you weren't throwing huge parties in there 7 nights a week, then it wouldn't affect the wine at all. While big and frequent temperature swings are harmful to the longevity of a wine, a degree or two here or there does nothing. Most wines are not as sensitive as you think, especially if you're not holding them for any longer than a decade.

MNSNTZR
Oct 13, 2012


I need New Year's advice, wine thread. And maybe some advice for myself.

My moscato-loving winner of a boyfriend () very recently told me that all dry wine tastes the same to him and that "at least moscato has flavor". What in hell's name can I do for this boy? I want to offer him a lineup of off-dry to easy-dry wines, one of each type in reds and whites. I think a Dornfelder would be a real winner, since it's turned over plenty of moscato-drinkers at my job, but I'm sort of at a loss about the other red and the two whites. I'm personally nuts about old vine Zinfandels when I want something a little sweet, but I'm afraid of even that sort of dryness being too advanced for him. And then there's the issue of not being able to think of hardly any off-dry whites, other than maybe a Vouvray. What's the best course of action here?

My personal dilemma is a little easier. My wine journey has stagnated at Petite Sirah and white meritage. I want to run drier, but whenever I dip my toes into, say, Chard/Cab/Merlot, the results are not favorable. But maybe I keep drinking lovely examples of them. So what are good, available (small town) examples of these styles? Or what would be a wine that would be a better step?

Overwined
Sep 22, 2008

Wine can of their wits the wise beguile,
Make the sage frolic, and the serious smile.


Well, I think this is something we've all seen before. In general almost everyone starts out liking sugar. Given enough exposure, they almost always slowly acquire a drier palate. The main obstacle here is openmindedness. For this to happen, people have to be at least willing to try new things and make an effort to enjoy them. Without getting too personal, I'll say that you may have a case of a stubborn palate. If you can't change the mindset then you might not be able to achieve your goal. And again trying not to get too preachy, so what? Some people are happy drinking swill. Who are we to force them to change?

Anyway, as to the substance of your strategy, I think you're on the right path. I find that the best way to "fool" a sweet wine drinker is to offer them something excessively fruity but that ultimately has a lower RS than they're used to. Zin is a good call, though Moscato drinkers may be sensitive to the alcohol. Australian Shiraz, most American generic "red blends", and maybe some southern Italian reds (Primitivo, Nero d'Avola).

Another tack you can take is to offer a wine with the same RS they are used to, but with more depth, such as Sauternes, Rhein Rieslings or Tokaji. Vouvray Sec is an excellent idea on your part in this regard.

himajinga
Mar 19, 2003

Und wenn du lange in einen Schuh blickst, blickt der Schuh auch in dich hinein.


For your own tastes as far as whites go, I've noticed that New World Chardonnays that have some malolactic buttery flavor don't seem as bracingly dry as most other whites, while still actually having low RS. The thick creamy mouthfeel usually compensates and kind of eases you into it. They can be had inexpensively if you want to experiment and not be out too much if you still hate it. Chateau Ste. Michelle Indian Wells Chardonnay is pretty widely available at grocery stores etc and inexpensive for this sort of flavor profile in my experience. I think they have it at Costco for like $12 if you have one nearby.

E: getting into wine can be an intimidating and long process. When I first met my girlfriend's parents years ago they brought along a Leonetti and a Quilceda to have at dinner and when offered wine I passed since "I'm not super into wine, I'm more of a beer guy" and drank an IPA or some nonsense These day's I'd kick a baby for a 10 year old bottle of Leonetti, but if the person's not ready or interested, they're not ready or interested.

himajinga fucked around with this message at Dec 11, 2014 around 18:42

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


The best thing you can do if you're trying to get someone into wine is to make sure you're buying decent stuff. It's pretty hard to find good wine in a variety of styles beyond your go-tos for less than $15-20 unless you know what you're doing. Get a decent bottle of a variety of classic styles to see what works, and if nothing does, just give up heh. Here's a selection of what I hope will be easy-to-find (I assume you're American) high quality wines of classics styles for ~$20 or less.

Bubbles: Roederer Estate
NZ Sauvignon Blanc: Oyster Bay
Riesling: Dr. Loosen Blue Slate Riesling Kabinett
Chardonnay: Evans and Tate Metricup Road Chardonnay
New World Pinot Noir: La Crema Pinot Noir Sonoma or Monterey
New World Cab: Liberty School (2012 ideally)
Zin: De Loach Russian River

Somebody American could probably offer better examples but these are a good start.

himajinga posted:

For your own tastes as far as whites go, I've noticed that New World Chardonnays that have some malolactic buttery flavor don't seem as bracingly dry as most other whites, while still actually having low RS.

Well actually New World Chardonnays do typically ha-

himajinga
Mar 19, 2003

Und wenn du lange in einen Schuh blickst, blickt der Schuh auch in dich hinein.


Kasumeat posted:

Well actually New World Chardonnays do typically ha-

himajinga fucked around with this message at Dec 11, 2014 around 22:39

Crimson
Nov 6, 2002


Overwined posted:

That's quite awesome. The AS in and of itself is an amazing accomplishment to be revered. I wish you the best on your MS. Out of curiosity, how much time per week are you devoting to study? Do you talk to your sponsor much?

Thanks! Roughly 15-20 hours a week (2 a day, more on weekends). Would be more if I wasn't so slammed at work during the holidays. Even with a couple hundred hours to study between now and March 2nd, my odds of passing the theory are extremely low.

You don't need a sponsor or letter of rec for the MS, you just submit your intent to sit the exam and they review your history and invite you should they see fit. You need 3 letters of rec for the Advanced.

I do have regular tastings with masters, though. Trying to squeeze into the legendary Fred Dame's tasting rotation at the moment. But no direct sponsor.

Biomute
Jun 7, 2005


MNSNTZR posted:

I need New Year's advice, wine thread. And maybe some advice for myself.

My moscato-loving winner of a boyfriend () very recently told me that all dry wine tastes the same to him and that "at least moscato has flavor". What in hell's name can I do for this boy? I want to offer him a lineup of off-dry to easy-dry wines, one of each type in reds and whites. I think a Dornfelder would be a real winner, since it's turned over plenty of moscato-drinkers at my job, but I'm sort of at a loss about the other red and the two whites. I'm personally nuts about old vine Zinfandels when I want something a little sweet, but I'm afraid of even that sort of dryness being too advanced for him. And then there's the issue of not being able to think of hardly any off-dry whites, other than maybe a Vouvray. What's the best course of action here?

My personal dilemma is a little easier. My wine journey has stagnated at Petite Sirah and white meritage. I want to run drier, but whenever I dip my toes into, say, Chard/Cab/Merlot, the results are not favorable. But maybe I keep drinking lovely examples of them. So what are good, available (small town) examples of these styles? Or what would be a wine that would be a better step?

I'd stoke his love for sweeter wines, but encourage him to try something dry once in a while. If his interest grows he'll probably want to branch out sooner or later. There's nothing wrong with enjoying sweet wines, and a whole world there to explore. Start him off with a nice Riesling from Alsace and some cheese, or perhaps a lovely Tokaji?

Biomute fucked around with this message at Dec 12, 2014 around 13:30

got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


Reading through the last 10-15 pages of the thread, it sounds like people don't like Sauternes that much, which makes me sad because I love how they taste (or maybe I'm just a big babby that likes sugar). I will readily admit that I've had lots of indifferent Sauternes that taste like sugar water but I think they can be amazingly satisfying when things come together (aromatic, viscous, enough acid to balance things). I don't consider myself a wine expert or anything; could you guys please enlighten me as to why

Also, I know even less about domestic wine but the best that I've ever had, by far, was the 2007 Pahlmeyer Proprietary Red (Christmas present from a boss). Could someone please recommend me some similar wineries/bottles to try?

consensual poster
Sep 1, 2009



Admirable Gusto posted:

Reading through the last 10-15 pages of the thread, it sounds like people don't like Sauternes that much, which makes me sad because I love how they taste (or maybe I'm just a big babby that likes sugar). I will readily admit that I've had lots of indifferent Sauternes that taste like sugar water but I think they can be amazingly satisfying when things come together (aromatic, viscous, enough acid to balance things). I don't consider myself a wine expert or anything; could you guys please enlighten me as to why

Also, I know even less about domestic wine but the best that I've ever had, by far, was the 2007 Pahlmeyer Proprietary Red (Christmas present from a boss). Could someone please recommend me some similar wineries/bottles to try?

We don't?! That might be the opinion of a few here, but not many.

I'm on the fence with them. I've had amazing ones, but there are aspects of Botrytis that I find off-putting at times.

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


It's less about what's wrong with Sauternes, and more about what's right about other dessert wines. Dessert wine is so incredibly unfashionable right now that it's outrageously underpriced from pretty much everywhere except Sauternes and maaaayyyybe Tokaj. You can consistently get mind-blowing Bonnezeaux for $40, Juracon for $20, or Auslese for $30. Why spend $60 for half-bottle of something half as good?

Admirable Gusto posted:

Reading through the last 10-15 pages of the thread, it sounds like people don't like Sauternes that much, which makes me sad because I love how they taste (or maybe I'm just a big babby that likes sugar). I will readily admit that I've had lots of indifferent Sauternes that taste like sugar water but I think they can be amazingly satisfying when things come together (aromatic, viscous, enough acid to balance things). I don't consider myself a wine expert or anything; could you guys please enlighten me as to why

Also, I know even less about domestic wine but the best that I've ever had, by far, was the 2007 Pahlmeyer Proprietary Red (Christmas present from a boss). Could someone please recommend me some similar wineries/bottles to try?

Pahlmayer would fall into the ultra-ripe ultra-modern Bordeaux blend camp. You should enjoy other Cabernet-based wines over 15% and $50.

Rurutia
Jun 11, 2009


I had this late harvest French dessert wine that tasted like complex toasted caramel. I cannot for the life of me remember what it was, does anyone have any ideas?

Spatule
Mar 18, 2003

I'M A WORTHLESS FAGGOT AND I HATE CANON.
SHOVEL HOT TAR INTO MY ANUS PLEASE.


Had some Valpolicella Ripasso, drat it's good, and hard to find.

Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Finally got my shipment. A lot of stuff was out of stock, but managed to get these:

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got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


Kasumeat posted:

You can consistently get mind-blowing Bonnezeaux for $40, Juracon for $20, or Auslese for $30. Why spend $60 for half-bottle of something half as good?

Just ordered a 1990 Chateau de Fesles Bonnezeaux. Thanks for the recommendation

Also I just won an auction for a 2001 Rieussec. SQUEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

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