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Ola
Jul 19, 2004



Found there is a 1996 Chardonnay as well, so going for that plus the 1999 blend. If I can get my order through. Release Fridays on the Norwegian state wine shop tends to incinerate the server hamsters, so they're trying out some sort of queue token tomorrow. But I don't think these Rolets are what people the most for anyway.

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brunch with yr parents
Jan 6, 2013


Goddamit, my 45 bottle wine fridge went haywire and set itself to freezer mode. The good news is that my only really fancy stuff, a bunch of ridge monte bellos from the past 10 years, were at the top of the fridge and appear to have gotten really cold but not actually frozen. The bad news is that nearly everything else at least partially froze, with some partially popping their corks.

Iíll be sampling the ones that popped over the next few days, but does anyone know what I should expect for the ones that froze but otherwise remained intact and for the really really really cold Ridges? Hopefully I wonít be stuck drinking he worlds fanciest sangria over the weekend.

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


That sucks, sorry to hear. The fridge at a restaurant I worked at did the same thing. If the corks have pushed at all, they will almost certainly start to oxidise, so I strongly recommend either drinking or rebottling (ASAP) anything that shows the slightest signs of it. If you rebottle, I would recommend drinking sooner than you usually would (unless of course you have a bunch of the same wine and you can monitor it by opening bottles periodically), they just don't keep as long in my experience. If you don't rebottle them, drink as soon as possible; ideally within a couple of weeks.

Stuff that doesn't show any signs of the cork pushing should be fine. The only thing you might notice is some tartrate precipitation in the wines that weren't cold stabilised, which is lovely because it lowers the acidity in your wine a little, but it's not the end of the world.

Comb Your Beard
Sep 28, 2007

Chillin' like a villian.

Had some really good wines recently. Some well aged Cali stuff and a new varietal for me.

1994 King Estate Pinot Noir Reserve (Oregon) - Really bad cork, had to filter little pieces out. Held up very well despite. Still some primary character. I enjoyed this way more than the '90 Red Burg I had that was so thin.

1991 Carmenet Cabernet Franc (Sonoma) - Awesome. No bell pepper notes here. Quite unlike the aged left bank Red Bdx I had, this showed age in a very different way. Definite aged notes.

2015 Tasca D'Almerita Nero d'Avola (Sicily) - Most of the Italy wine I drink is Piedmont so I figured why not branch out. Not too tannic. Nose gave me hint of cherry. Definitely nice.

got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


Comb Your Beard posted:

1991 Carmenet Cabernet Franc (Sonoma) - Awesome. No bell pepper notes here. Quite unlike the aged left bank Red Bdx I had, this showed age in a very different way. Definite aged notes.

Nice. I had a 1984 Carmenet (bdx blend) at a restaurant a while back and remember it quite fondly. Rather 'sweeter' and juicier than the French equivalent. Did you find this on a wine list or at a retailer? I ask because I've been meaning to pick up a few if I can find it, and 1991 is certainly as good as any vintage for quite a range

Comb Your Beard
Sep 28, 2007

Chillin' like a villian.

got off on a technicality posted:

Nice. I had a 1984 Carmenet (bdx blend) at a restaurant a while back and remember it quite fondly. Rather 'sweeter' and juicier than the French equivalent. Did you find this on a wine list or at a retailer? I ask because I've been meaning to pick up a few if I can find it, and 1991 is certainly as good as any vintage for quite a range

It was from an online vendor I originally found with wine searcher just searching by year and lower price. https://shopbanquet.com/wineadvise

I look through all of their aged stuff and sometimes cross reference with vintage charts/reports, put together a nice order.

idiotsavant
Jun 4, 2000


Pepperless Cab franc is boring Cab franc, fite me

got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


I like my cab francs ripe and from 09 and with a cheval blanc label on

(jk I've never had cheval blanc)

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


idiotsavant posted:

Pepperless Cab franc is boring Cab franc, fite me

Agreed, but the true pinnacle of the grape is screamingly acidic off-dry rose

Professor Shark
May 22, 2012



Pillbug

I have a very special life occasion coming up and I really want to celebrate it with a bottle of Bollinger 007 champagne (I think that fits "Goony Wine"). Up until a few months ago it could be had here in Nova Scotia, however all 7 of the bottles available disappeared. I'm kicking myself for not buying a bottle when I could.

There seem to be quite a few bottles in the US. Do you guys do the same thing as beer people and send internationally?

Furious Lobster
Jun 17, 2006



Grimey Drawer

Professor Shark posted:

I have a very special life occasion coming up and I really want to celebrate it with a bottle of Bollinger 007 champagne (I think that fits "Goony Wine"). Up until a few months ago it could be had here in Nova Scotia, however all 7 of the bottles available disappeared. I'm kicking myself for not buying a bottle when I could.

There seem to be quite a few bottles in the US. Do you guys do the same thing as beer people and send internationally?

It's hard to ship alcohol to Canada because the inspection service on your end cares a lot more about inspection shipping. My friend has tried many times to send stuff to Canada but to no avail.

got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


How about Pol Roger Sir Winston Churchill? IMO cooler and tastier

got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


Kasumeat posted:

Agreed, but the true pinnacle of the grape is screamingly acidic off-dry rose

Can you please recommend an example of this

Professor Shark
May 22, 2012



Pillbug

got off on a technicality posted:

How about Pol Roger Sir Winston Churchill? IMO cooler and tastier

No joke, that was my #2 choice and it's available here!

My partner and I make fridge magnets from the champagne we drink to celebrate special occasions, so as lame as it sounds, the capsule has some degree of influence. I want this one to be unique, and wonder if starring at a frowning Churchill will be weird



I found a place that will send a bottle of 007 Bollinger to Canada for $270 CAD, shipping included... a bit steep

Jerome Louis
Nov 5, 2002
p

College Slice

Recently had a Sonoma Cab that was out of this world and the opposite of what I come to expect from California Cabernet, Sheldon Winery's Sonoma Cab, lower ABV (for a CA cab), bright acid, intensely fresh and vibrant blackberries, not the dull jammy dark fruit I get from most CA cabs, but an aroma that smells very similar to when we macerate fresh marionberries in wine to train our sensory panelists on what fresh dark fruit smells like. A little bit of yeast, a hint of funkiness, no apparent oak aromas, a little pine resin. Medium tannin, definitely more on the drinkable side. When it comes to California Cab (even some of the higher end) I pretty much expect sticky, flabby high alcohol oak bombs, this is the opposite of that.

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


got off on a technicality posted:

Can you please recommend an example of this

I wish I could recommend many, but they've become so, so scarce since the insipid pink bilgewater known as ProvenÁal rose has taken over and off-dry roses have become so unfashionable. The only half-decent one I've encountered recently is Remy Pannier, and it was just that, half-decent. If you're unsure of the sweetness of a bottle of Loire rose, the off-dry ones tend to be labeled Rose d'Anjou more often than a more specific appellation, will usually be around 9-11.5% ABV, and are typically a little cheaper than dry bottlings.


got off on a technicality posted:

How about Pol Roger Sir Winston Churchill? IMO cooler and tastier

It's not quite as flashy, but plain ol' Vintage Pol Roger frequently beats Sir Winston Churchill in blind tastings. I just had a taste of 2000 recently which was absolutely singing.

Furious Lobster
Jun 17, 2006



Grimey Drawer

My only regret is that I got just half a case.

Crimson
Nov 6, 2002


Furious Lobster posted:

My only regret is that I got just half a case.



Oh snap, you know that's his last vintage, right? The guy is in his 90s.

Furious Lobster
Jun 17, 2006



Grimey Drawer

Crimson posted:

Oh snap, you know that's his last vintage, right? The guy is in his 90s.

Yep.

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006



Kasumeat posted:

It's not quite as flashy, but plain ol' Vintage Pol Roger frequently beats Sir Winston Churchill in blind tastings. I just had a taste of 2000 recently which was absolutely singing.

Pol Roger Vintage is excellent, I approve of this post.

got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear



What's up Gabriel Glas buddy

I've never had it; is it really worth the tariff to source? Do you prefer it to Clape, Allemand, etc

Furious Lobster
Jun 17, 2006



Grimey Drawer

got off on a technicality posted:

What's up Gabriel Glas buddy

I've never had it; is it really worth the tariff to source? Do you prefer it to Clape, Allemand, etc

Zalto actually, though I did pick up a few Golds on sale yesterday, so I'm excited to try them out.

I've had a lot of Allemdand including the sans soufre, and while I initially get some really fun wild notes, the taste doesn't last and I'm left with regular Syrah, which I 'm not the biggest fan of; in the case of Juge, the exotic taste only grows as it opens up.

Professor Shark
May 22, 2012



Pillbug

PT6A posted:

Pol Roger Vintage is excellent, I approve of this post.

Hey PT6A, are you still in Alberta? I heard back from a company that will sell me a bottle of that 007 Bollinger if I'm still interested, only they can only ship to Alberta.

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006



Professor Shark posted:

Hey PT6A, are you still in Alberta? I heard back from a company that will sell me a bottle of that 007 Bollinger if I'm still interested, only they can only ship to Alberta.

Yes I am. PM me.

I assume the original shipper will take care of properly packaging the bottle for shipment, so I don't have to worry about that beyond getting it insured for shipping, right? That's the only thing I'd be worried about.

Professor Shark
May 22, 2012



Pillbug

PT6A posted:

Yes I am. PM me.

I assume the original shipper will take care of properly packaging the bottle for shipment, so I don't have to worry about that beyond getting it insured for shipping, right? That's the only thing I'd be worried about.

They gave me an estimate of $90 USD shipping, so I'm going to pass on it. Thanks for being willing, though! I'll keep looking around in the mean time, otherwise I'm waiting until the next Bond in 2019.

Professor Shark fucked around with this message at Feb 7, 2018 around 20:14

got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


woe is me I have fallen down the Burgundy rabbit hole

it goes something like: oh people are saying Roumier's an awesome producer, let's go look up the pricing on their musigny/amoureuses/bonnes mares......

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


It's mostly 2015s on the market now, and the 1er and Grand Crus were too hot to make great Burgundy. Stick with the "lesser" appellations for 2015s and you'll be fine. Or better yet, go for the good New World producers, there's tons of legitimately elegant Pinot being made in California, Oregon, New Zealand, and especially Ontario if you can find it these days.

Ola
Jul 19, 2004



The recommendation I got was go for the big producer commune wines like Faiveley. I've skipped over it so far. Bordeaux is starting to look like a steal in comparison!

Subjunctive
Sep 12, 2006

careful now


Cybernetic Crumb

Kasumeat posted:

It's mostly 2015s on the market now, and the 1er and Grand Crus were too hot to make great Burgundy. Stick with the "lesser" appellations for 2015s and you'll be fine. Or better yet, go for the good New World producers, there's tons of legitimately elegant Pinot being made in California, Oregon, New Zealand, and especially Ontario if you can find it these days.

What are some of your favoured Ontario producers?

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


Subjunctive posted:

What are some of your favoured Ontario producers?

For Pinot Noir, Norman Hardie by a pretty big margin. Other great ones are The Old Third (I think they're 100% cellar door only, unfortunately), Leaning Post, Closson Chase, Bachelder, Queylus, Tawse (countless different bottlings, some much better than others), and Rosehall Run. Prince Edward County is generally better than Niagara for the featherweight style of Pinot I enjoy most, as the latter is usually too hot to get fully ripe wines at under 13%.

Subjunctive
Sep 12, 2006

careful now


Cybernetic Crumb

Iíve got some Hardie and Tawse downstairs now, but Iíll check out the others. Thanks!

Comb Your Beard
Sep 28, 2007

Chillin' like a villian.

One of the best Chardonnays I've had in quite a while. Actually a white blend 80% Chard. NE Italy. Pretty affordable.

https://www.cellartracker.com/wine.asp?iWine=2624202

I really have way more red in my cellar right now, I should get some old Riesling or something.

idiotsavant
Jun 4, 2000


Welp, think I made some loving awesome 2017 rose after all. Just finished racking and SO2 adds, plus some more regular Garnacha from the same vineyard just to top up barrels. Super light skins, so the color is a little dark (mainly from the extra normal Garnacha) but still good.

Originally I stomped Garnacha & left it on the skins for two days before I pressed, then let it ferment outside in the nice, cold air. Itís been in used barrel for 4 months so far and after racking everything and adding the extra Garnacha & SO2 itís doing a killer thing I think of as pickled watermelon, along with bright, half-ripe strawberries, sharp cherries, almost cranberry? Astringency and acid are just where I want them for the finish, not too brutal but enough to make it interesting and move the palate evolution along. And thereís a perfect grip to it at the end thanks to the skin contact. Juicy and fresh as hell and that little chunk of tannin on the finish tops it all off.

2017 harvest crushed me in every way and Iím still playing catch-up, so having at least one wine looking like itíll come out rad is a big relief.

pantsfree
Oct 22, 2012


Twice in the past few months, I've encountered what the internet is telling me is a reduction fault - wine that smells/tastes strongly of canned corn (Dimethyl sulfide?). First in a cheapish St. Chinian red, which was absolutely vile and undrinkable, and then an Aussie (Mornington Peninsula) pinot noir, where it was noticeable and spoiled the wine but not as overwhelmingly awful.

Both were 2015s, one was a screwcap, one a cork. Both had been in my wine rack for less than a year. In both cases it didn't blow off after being left open overnight.

How does this happen? Is this the sort of thing where you can just have bad luck, or could I be causing this through storage conditions in any way?

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


I'm not certain that's reduction. Canned corn is more of a note I get from bad warm-climate Chardonnay, I can't recall ever getting it on reds. Reduction fault smells distinctly sulferous, like rotten onions, cabbage, or eggs. Generally, it can be smelled a lot more than it can be tasted. And finally, it should eventually go away with enough exposure to oxygen. I've never had it take more than a day, though theoretically it could take longer.

It's caused by the wine getting too little oxygen exposure during winemaking, and often it's a stylistic choice. Just enough can be really thrillingóthe hallmark explosive tropical fruit of New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc or the fresh-struck-match of trendy White Burgundy are achieved through reductionóbut too much is stinky. It's tough for winemakers to gauge because counter-intuitively, wines go through a period of becoming more reductive in bottle before becoming less so. The less oxygen exposure the closure allows, the slower this process will be.

Unfortunately, I'm not really sure what the issue with those wines was, and as I said I'm a little doubtful it's reduction. If you encounter it again, reduction should go away with enough exposure to oxygen, so just give it more time. If it doesn't resolve and the wine starts smelling oxidative (nutty or of dried fruit), it's definitely not reduction. Or if you got the bottle from a wine shop, you can return it and ask for their insight.

Stitecin
Feb 6, 2004
Mayor of Stitecinopolis

pantsfree posted:

Twice in the past few months, I've encountered what the internet is telling me is a reduction fault - wine that smells/tastes strongly of canned corn (Dimethyl sulfide?). First in a cheapish St. Chinian red, which was absolutely vile and undrinkable, and then an Aussie (Mornington Peninsula) pinot noir, where it was noticeable and spoiled the wine but not as overwhelmingly awful.

Both were 2015s, one was a screwcap, one a cork. Both had been in my wine rack for less than a year. In both cases it didn't blow off after being left open overnight.

How does this happen? Is this the sort of thing where you can just have bad luck, or could I be causing this through storage conditions in any way?

Yeah, Dimethyl Sulfide is about a bitch. You can try to fine it with a course of ascorbic acid followed by copper sulfate (sulfite?) I have never produced it, or tasted it naturally occuring in wine, but I have had samples at various concentrations prepared by Enartis Vinquiry at one of their faults seminars. It's gross. Like most things everyone's threshold is slightly different for detection, but I have never heard of it being seen as a positive.

bartolimu
Nov 25, 2002



Where does DMS come from in wine? I've never heard of it outside of beer making context, where it's widely understood to come from grain - especially under-boiled grain. Are the "bad warm-climate Chardonnay" producers chaptalizing with maltose for some crazy reason?

Stitecin
Feb 6, 2004
Mayor of Stitecinopolis

bartolimu posted:

Where does DMS come from in wine? I've never heard of it outside of beer making context, where it's widely understood to come from grain - especially under-boiled grain. Are the "bad warm-climate Chardonnay" producers chaptalizing with maltose for some crazy reason?

Chapatalizing is illegal in most of the new world. When it happens it usually happens with plain white sugar, no one would ever admit to it but on the rare underripe years in Napa the grocery store shelves will be bare of sugar.

The real answer is struggling yeast. Lots of things are at play; fermentation temps too high or low, osmotic pressure too high, alcohol content too high, YAN (yeast assimilatable nitrogen) too low, lack of oxygen, competition with ML bacteria, etc. can all contribute to yeast stress and different strains of yeast handle different stressors better/worse than others. The same factors contribute to regular reduction. Most of the time when I have pointed it out to friends it has been in lots that stuck and had to be restarted. The association with bad Chardonnay could be high Brix/low YAN must plus reductive winemaking to preserve the little bit of freshness plus yeast strain meant to brighten up the aromatics that aren't suited to style.

Edit: I realize I just contradicted my previous post. When I said I have never tasted it naturally occurring I meant as the canned corn expression. The restart expression is more like burnt hair or home perm.

Stitecin fucked around with this message at Feb 24, 2018 around 05:20

pantsfree
Oct 22, 2012


So if it occurs during vinification then wouldnít it affect the whole vintage? I find it hard to believe that anyone would have knowingly released a wine that tasted as foul as the first one I encountered.

Is there any way DMS could develop in bottle? The internet is giving pretty mixed information on this.

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Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


Yes, it can develop in bottle.

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