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Professor Shark
May 22, 2012



Pillbug

I ended up picking up a bottle of Charles Heidsieck Rose Reserve after my partner said they'd like to have another Rose (we had a bottle of Henry Abele Rose, it was really good!).

We'll put it away for a month or so until we have a good enough reason to open it, but since we both really enjoy mid-range champagnes I think I'll start buying a bottle every so often and just storing them. Our provincial liquor company has a tendency to drop prices very quickly and without warning, so I don't want to miss out on something again.

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Snowy
Oct 6, 2010

A man whose blood
Is very snow-broth;
One who never feels
The wanton stings and
Motions of the sense


Fun Shoe

Vague request: I'd like to give a bottle of red wine as a gift, but I don't know exactly what the recipient likes. Is there something I could get in the $40-60 range that's a surefire hit and also likely for me to be able to find easily? I'm in NYC so I have a few good wine shops but their suggestions can be hit or miss so I figured I should see what you guys think. I'm guessing something like cabernet since it's easy, but I'm open.

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


The safest bet is Brunello. It's got enough power to please those who are into that, but also enough finesse to please those with more geeky taste. You can also find them with a good amount of age on them, which is usually something that people appreciate if you're trying to make an impression.

Trimson Grondag 3
Jul 1, 2007



Clapping Larry

I’m an Australian who is going to be in Barcelona in May, and I last time I used to opportunity to grab some old PX for around $700 that would have cost me $2000 in Australia. I was think of doing the same again but what do you think about the risk of travel damage on the 25 hour return flight? The px is so stable you can leave it open for years, but if I get some fancy Bordeaux or something is it going to be at risk?

I also brought some priorat and cava gone last trip but I haven’t opened either yet so not sure on the impact.

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


Trimson Grondag 3 posted:

I’m an Australian who is going to be in Barcelona in May, and I last time I used to opportunity to grab some old PX for around $700 that would have cost me $2000 in Australia. I was think of doing the same again but what do you think about the risk of travel damage on the 25 hour return flight? The px is so stable you can leave it open for years, but if I get some fancy Bordeaux or something is it going to be at risk?

I also brought some priorat and cava gone last trip but I haven’t opened either yet so not sure on the impact.

I travel with wine pretty much every time I fly, often a case worth in my suitcase/backpack. There's always going to be some risk, but I've never had a break. Just wrap the bottles in your clothes and try to keep them as close to the centre of your luggage as possible.

Edit: To be clear, there's not much risk other than breakage. There'll be some temperature flux, but it's usually cold-but-not-freezing, which is pretty low-risk.

Trimson Grondag 3
Jul 1, 2007



Clapping Larry

Thanks, I'm limited to three 750ml bottles duty free so each one is precious. Other than being way cheaper its mostly about being able to get things you won't ever get in Australia like auction german riesling or a lot of priorat (I loving love priorat). Bordeaux is actually about the same price so probably a bad example.

Ominous Balls
Apr 8, 2009


13.00-14.00 Wholesale is what most of our crushable CA natural rosés are coming in at. Awesome oddballs like La Clarine and Clos Saron are a bit higher. There isn't a lot of wiggle room on that. We have tried pallet pricing, but most on or off-premise accounts are a little wary of buying 56 cases at a time. We just got in a very small amount of Broc Cellars Pet Nat Chenin, Trousseau Noir, and Mission. Excited to try them.

We're pretty locked down on placements for most of those guys. Our S. Rhone and Languedoc stuff is quite a bit lower priced, and that's what really carries us through rosé season (in TX it is a long one.)

The 3L box and 20L key keg of the Domaine de la Patience Rosé is kind of my bread and butter right now. Excellent for the price, and it makes BTG accounts happy that they don't have to worry about opening bottles, and spoilage.

Just had Domaine Tempier 2016, and Ch. St. Anne Bandol Rosé 2016 side by side. A real treat with some fresh cheese, and roast chicken.

got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


Snowy posted:

Vague request: I'd like to give a bottle of red wine as a gift, but I don't know exactly what the recipient likes. Is there something I could get in the $40-60 range that's a surefire hit and also likely for me to be able to find easily? I'm in NYC so I have a few good wine shops but their suggestions can be hit or miss so I figured I should see what you guys think. I'm guessing something like cabernet since it's easy, but I'm open.

Ridge Geyserville would be a reliable choice; I've had it a number of times and it's a confirmed crowd pleaser. Also it can age (I've tasted ~40 year old Ridge zins in great shape) and has wine geek cred
https://www.freerangebrooklyn.com/s...lle-2012/dp/841

If you want to take a bit more of a risk and/or your recipient is a Francophile (i.e. snob like me) 2015 was a nice ripe year all over France and IMO Burgundy village wines from known producers are good buys. This is what I'd pick over a Napa cab (in my v humble opinion Napa cabs can be worse value than Burgundy, which is saying something)
https://www.chambersstwines.com/Pro...marsannay-rouge

got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


Trimson Grondag 3 posted:

Thanks, I'm limited to three 750ml bottles duty free so each one is precious. Other than being way cheaper its mostly about being able to get things you won't ever get in Australia like auction german riesling or a lot of priorat (I loving love priorat). Bordeaux is actually about the same price so probably a bad example.

Over the years I've flown with really nice bottles all over the place (e.g. West Coast -> Singapore with ~18h flight time) and have never had a problem even with champagne bottles. Per Kasumeat the main risk is breakage - the temperature in the baggage hold will be fine. You could be paranoid like me and go the extra mile with bubble wrap and mini cold packs, but just wrapping your bottles in clothes ought to be fine

These days I just have a wine check http://www.thewinecheck.com/

idiotsavant
Jun 4, 2000


Snowy posted:

Vague request: I'd like to give a bottle of red wine as a gift, but I don't know exactly what the recipient likes. Is there something I could get in the $40-60 range that's a surefire hit and also likely for me to be able to find easily? I'm in NYC so I have a few good wine shops but their suggestions can be hit or miss so I figured I should see what you guys think. I'm guessing something like cabernet since it's easy, but I'm open.

Get some rad cru Beaujolais. “Cru Beaujolais” is the answer to every “I don’t know what red wine to bring!” question ever. Unless your range is $20-30 and then the answer is “village Beaujolais but stil maybe some crus”

idiotsavant
Jun 4, 2000


Ominous Balls posted:

13.00-14.00 Wholesale is what most of our crushable CA natural rosés are coming in at.

Just had Domaine Tempier 2016, and Ch. St. Anne Bandol Rosé 2016 side by side. A real treat with some fresh cheese, and roast chicken.
Cool. I really want people to try the wines and be able to feel like they got more than they paid for, but like I said, gotta pay that rent. As for rose season, it feels like we’re almost there out here in SF, and maybe it’s time to pop one of my last Clos Roche Blanche roses (2014 I think?) and see what’s up.

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


idiotsavant posted:

Get some rad cru Beaujolais. “Cru Beaujolais” is the answer to every “I don’t know what red wine to bring!” question ever. Unless your range is $20-30 and then the answer is “village Beaujolais but stil maybe some crus”

Cru Bojo is like the worst thing imaginable to give in this spot. Many drinkers only know Nouveau and will think you just gave them a bottle of that. Not to mention that a lot of the Beaujolais in the $40+ range is really faulted and not to most people's taste.

Ola
Jul 19, 2004



Snowy posted:

Vague request: I'd like to give a bottle of red wine as a gift, but I don't know exactly what the recipient likes. Is there something I could get in the $40-60 range that's a surefire hit and also likely for me to be able to find easily? I'm in NYC so I have a few good wine shops but their suggestions can be hit or miss so I figured I should see what you guys think. I'm guessing something like cabernet since it's easy, but I'm open.

If not Brunello, then Châteauneuf-du-Pape.

Jovial Cow
Sep 7, 2006

inherently good


Goons I too have a request for a suggestion, I’m going to a six course dinner with six people and it was decided each person should bring a bottle for the table for their assigned course. I got assigned an interesting one: truffled pierogis with chive flowers and cremma.

Anyone have any ideas for that? Initial thought was white, but I’m by no means a wine pro so I’d take whatever styles or specific bottle recommendations I can get, would like to stay under $50 for the bottle if at all possible.

Ola
Jul 19, 2004



Jovial Cow posted:

Goons I too have a request for a suggestion, I’m going to a six course dinner with six people and it was decided each person should bring a bottle for the table for their assigned course. I got assigned an interesting one: truffled pierogis with chive flowers and cremma.

Anyone have any ideas for that? Initial thought was white, but I’m by no means a wine pro so I’d take whatever styles or specific bottle recommendations I can get, would like to stay under $50 for the bottle if at all possible.

Champagne. Ask for one that has a leesy, bready flavour, not a seafood-y oyster one.

consensual poster
Sep 1, 2009



Ola posted:

Champagne. Ask for one that has a leesy, bready flavour, not a seafood-y oyster one.

Leesy, bready Champagne under $50 is a tall order, especially to get one that doesn't suck.

Jovial Cow, you could get a decent village-level white Burgundy for under $50 depending on where you live and that would be an excellent pairing, IMO. Something with some richness and a touch of oak, but still good acidity.

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


Agreed, though Charles Heidseick might work depending on how it goes for locally. If you go for white Burg. you miiight be able to find some 1er Cru St. Aubin which would be your best bet.

Jovial Cow
Sep 7, 2006

inherently good


I'm in the tri-state area and dinner is in NYC so theoretically I should be able to find this stuff if I poke around, I'll keep an eye out for those two you recommended Kasumeat, appreciate the tips!

Ominous Balls
Apr 8, 2009


consensual poster posted:

Leesy, bready Champagne under $50 is a tall order, especially to get one that doesn't suck.

Jovial Cow, you could get a decent village-level white Burgundy for under $50 depending on where you live and that would be an excellent pairing, IMO. Something with some richness and a touch of oak, but still good acidity.

I'd say look for something highish level Southern White Burgundy Village. Pouilly Vinzelles, if you can find it. Maybe a Clotilde Davenne Cremant, or St. Bris? Those should both come in around 20 bucks wholesale.

Joke option: Super extended lees contact Albariño or some Methode Ancestral Cava.

Ominous Balls fucked around with this message at Apr 14, 2018 around 05:54

Crimson
Nov 6, 2002



Sauvignon Blanc with truffles? That sounds pretty rough to me.

I agree with southern white burg, just avoid Chablis for that dish.

Ola
Jul 19, 2004



Ominous Balls posted:

Methode Ancestral Cava.

I've had many bottles of this, most of them nice but ho hum, apart from one that we got from my girlfriend's friend, it had just been sitting in their cellar for who knows how long. Browsing labels now, I believe it was a Juvé y Camps, but it didn't have a vintage on the label. It was utterly amazing, developed, balanced and complex like a fine vintage champagne. Everyone who has some cellar space should try storing some higher end cava. You'll have some bulk bubbles for a party but also a nice risk/reward aging project.

Ominous Balls
Apr 8, 2009


Crimson posted:

Sauvignon Blanc with truffles? That sounds pretty rough to me.

I agree with southern white burg, just avoid Chablis for that dish.

You are correct. I glossed over the truffle part. Disregard.

idiotsavant
Jun 4, 2000


Kasumeat posted:

Cru Bojo is like the worst thing imaginable to give in this spot. Many drinkers only know Nouveau and will think you just gave them a bottle of that. Not to mention that a lot of the Beaujolais in the $40+ range is really faulted and not to most people's taste.

I see where you’re coming from, I’m thinking more of the wines than the existing impression. Something that’s lighter with a little acid but that can still have enough heft to satisfy. As for faults, sure, but I’d hope that they’d be buying through a shop they trust rather than just blind picking.

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006



Just had a bottle of Brunello di Montalcino last night -- I can confirm you should drink this stuff as often as possible! Probably one of the most enjoyable wines I've drank in a long while.

Ola
Jul 19, 2004



PT6A posted:

Just had a bottle of Brunello di Montalcino last night -- I can confirm you should drink this stuff as often as possible! Probably one of the most enjoyable wines I've drank in a long while.

I really like them, but I have not had good luck with aged ones. Went to a tasting last year with ones from 06 to 09, and some seemed to go a bit dull and off. Bought a '97 from a store in Pisa, probably been sitting in ambient air for years. As dead as a doornail, which was an interesting learning experience at least. So it may not be such a crime to drink them young, they have a lot of spice and power, and the tannins aren't too bad either.

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006



Ola posted:

I really like them, but I have not had good luck with aged ones. Went to a tasting last year with ones from 06 to 09, and some seemed to go a bit dull and off. Bought a '97 from a store in Pisa, probably been sitting in ambient air for years. As dead as a doornail, which was an interesting learning experience at least. So it may not be such a crime to drink them young, they have a lot of spice and power, and the tannins aren't too bad either.

Yeah, the one I had last night was an 09, and there was nothing about it that suggested it would be wise or necessary to wait any longer before drinking it. It's no Barolo, that's for certain.

Oddly enough, we also had a bottle of fairly generic Spanish tempranillo that was from 2005 (I guess it had just been ignored for a long time, it certainly wasn't aged intentionally to that degree), and I was certain it would be complete poo poo, but it was nice-ish. Over its peak, but not bad on any level.

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006



I need a reality check here. Wine bars (not restaurants, self-titled bars) that take reservations: complete bullshit, right?

I mean, I just want to have a nice place to casually drink some really great wine -- maybe for 20 minutes, maybe for three hours -- and now this place that I really liked went from walk-in to reservations. I understand this for a place that's focused on food, but I think if you're focused on wine and you have what is in essence a tapas menu, you need to be more flexible and at least leave the bar seatings for walk-ins even if you allow reservations for tables.

Am I out of line here? I'm pissed at this place because it's got really great wine, but I want to be able to go and enjoy it on a whim without planning. I'd rather have to wait 30 minutes than be frozen out the whole night by reservations, or told to gently caress off after 40 minutes to clear the table for a reservation.

In Spain, in a very similar establishment, the rule was: you put in your time standing, and eventually you may move closer to a barstool where you can sit. If you are blessed, then you may actually get a table after a while. That was cool and good because I could always go there for a glass of amazing wine, even if it meant standing up the whole time.

PT6A fucked around with this message at Apr 20, 2018 around 03:49

got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


PT6A posted:

I need a reality check here. Wine bars (not restaurants, self-titled bars) that take reservations: complete bullshit, right?

Wouldn't agree that taking reservations is a priori bullshit but perhaps living in the Bay Areas has warped my perspective

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


Sounds like bullshit to me. If it's a bar first and foremost, they should only take reservations for large parties. Mind you, there's a trend of restaurants calling themselves bars here, and it's bullshit too.

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006



Kasumeat posted:

Sounds like bullshit to me. If it's a bar first and foremost, they should only take reservations for large parties. Mind you, there's a trend of restaurants calling themselves bars here, and it's bullshit too.

It's called a bar, it's noted as a bar on their website, but it's being written up as a restaurant in a lot of places (and getting really good reviews, so demand is high), so I can see how that sort of puts them in a difficult position. It's also quite small -- fire capacity of 28 -- so anyone who plans a visit for a full meal would basically need a reservation.

It would just be nifty to have a place like that which doesn't require pre-planning to go to, for occasions where you just want to drink some awesome wine.

Jerome Louis
Nov 5, 2002
p

College Slice

Anyone know anything about the UC Davis Winemaking Certificate program? I'm accepted for it and work will pay for it so I'll probably just do it but wondering if it actually helped anyone start making wine at a commercial level.

Stitecin
Feb 6, 2004
Mayor of Stitecinopolis

Jerome Louis posted:

Anyone know anything about the UC Davis Winemaking Certificate program? I'm accepted for it and work will pay for it so I'll probably just do it but wondering if it actually helped anyone start making wine at a commercial level.

I am half(ish)-way through it, though I haven't worked toward finishing it since I left a previous position 3 years ago.

I would say the value of it isn't zero, but it won't make your career. Like, I started as a harvest intern. I did six vintages in three years (US, US, AUS, US sparkling, US, AUS) as an intern before taking a full time cellar gig. Then I worked three years as a cellar hand before being promoted to Assistant Winemaker. I worked four more years before taking a Winemaker job.

Maybe if I'd had that certificate to go along with my Urban Planning degree I could have advanced faster, but I passed on a full-time cellar hand gig after the first trip to AUS so I guess I could have done it quicker anyway.

If you are just starting a career leave it off your resumé. Then mention it to the interviewer after you've established yourself as someone who realizes you have no experience, will work hard, keep your mouth shut, and is truly interested in learning the craft.

TL;DR Don't pay for it, but if it's free through work do it.

idiotsavant
Jun 4, 2000


Yeah, if it’s paid for then go for it. Otherwise Santa Rosa JC or Napa Valley Community College can teach you the science and some of the process.

That said, you learn to make wine commercially by... making wine commercially. You get one shot a year, two if you spend time and efffort traveling for harvest in the Southern Hemisphere. Go make wine somewhere.

Jerome Louis
Nov 5, 2002
p

College Slice

idiotsavant posted:

Yeah, if it’s paid for then go for it. Otherwise Santa Rosa JC or Napa Valley Community College can teach you the science and some of the process.

That said, you learn to make wine commercially by... making wine commercially. You get one shot a year, two if you spend time and efffort traveling for harvest in the Southern Hemisphere. Go make wine somewhere.

Fortunately I do already work in the industry for a big alc mega corp, just not in Winemaking. I'll ask to shadow some winemakers after a class or two.

Stitecin
Feb 6, 2004
Mayor of Stitecinopolis

Jerome Louis posted:

Fortunately I do already work in the industry for a big alc mega corp, just not in Winemaking. I'll ask to shadow some winemakers after a class or two.

Ask to shadow someone wearing clothes that will dry quickly. At booze inc. the winemakers blend, write work orders, and do sales trips. That’s not what you’ll start out doing. Find a cellar master that speaks English and ask him to teach you how to sanitize fittings. Spend a bit of time doing it and if it’s still fun after half a day a career in wine production might be for you.

Jerome Louis
Nov 5, 2002
p

College Slice

Welp the cooler we use to store all our wine sensory bottles froze over the weekend and destroyed over $10,000 of wine, cool stuff

got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


Jerome Louis posted:

Welp the cooler we use to store all our wine sensory bottles froze over the weekend and destroyed over $10,000 of wine, cool stuff

Fascinating; what do they put in there exactly

Jerome Louis
Nov 5, 2002
p

College Slice

got off on a technicality posted:

Fascinating; what do they put in there exactly

I buy a lot of wines to serve as sensory references, for example if I find a wine that is a good example of bell pepper I'll buy a case or two of that wine and vintage and throw it in the cooler to use for training our panelists. We also keep our project wines and prototypes sent by our winemakers in there.

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


Look on the bright side, you probably have a bunch of wine that needs to be consumed ASAP. I drank a lot of Leflaive when our fridge at work froze, it really wasn't so bad.

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got off on a technicality
Feb 7, 2007

oh dear


Kasumeat posted:

Look on the bright side, you probably have a bunch of wine that needs to be consumed ASAP. I drank a lot of Leflaive when our fridge at work froze, it really wasn't so bad.

This sounds like a lovely problem to have. I've never bought any Leflaive because I've been scared off by reports of premox; would you say they're exaggerated? Or were you drinking wines from before it apparently started happening (IIRC 2009 or so)

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