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Stringent
Dec 22, 2004

The internet is the universal sewer.


Kasumeat posted:

This is very, very, very wrong. They're both important, if you have to rank importance, it's definitely temperature first.

Don't gently caress around with any wine storage devices unless you have a ton of old wines you plan on preserving. Any young wine of good quality will keep for at least a day in the fridge, most three or more. The vacuum based ones will prevent oxidation, but they will also pull volatile molecules from the wine, muting some aromas. The argon ones work a little better but I find they also mute aromas as well. The best thing is what idiotsavant suggested. Just get some smaller bottles and pour your wines in there. Screwcaps are great for this. Most wines will keep over a week if there's very little headspace, and really, how much longer do you need?

long term storage of course temperature matters, but for an open bottle of table wine it really doesn't. the best solution is to just drink the bottle after you open it.

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PT6A
Jan 5, 2006



I think the question has a distinctly different character when you're talking about a very good bottle versus an average bottle of wine. If you're drinking a fairly average bottle of wine with dinner some night and you don't want to catch a massive buzz, it's okay to drink half a bottle and then stick the remainder in the fridge for a few days. It ain't gonna be perfect, but it will not suffer a great deal and you can casually drink the rest on some other day. If you have a very special bottle and you want every nuance and subtlety to remain, wait until you can finish the bottle in one sitting -- either a day when you don't mind taking a whole bottle of wine down by yourself, or a day when you're sharing it with company.

I mean, practically speaking, I don't want to drink an entire bottle of wine every time I want to drink some wine at home. There's no perfect method to solve this problem, but frankly all the various "systems" are too much work for too little effect. Just drink wine of average quality when you don't intend on finishing the bottle, stopper it, and stick in the fridge, and it'll be good enough that it doesn't really matter.

Kasumeat
Nov 18, 2004


Wine quality is one of the biggest determinants as to how long it will keep once open. A cheap bottle will deteriorate very quickly, and a quality wine will hold for a long time.

Stringent posted:

long term storage of course temperature matters, but for an open bottle of table wine it really doesn't. the best solution is to just drink the bottle after you open it.

Again, you're just plain wrong. I see this all the time at my work. If you really don't believe me, test it out for yourself with some wine split between the fridge and room temperature.

Kasumeat fucked around with this message at Dec 10, 2018 around 16:52

Ola
Jul 19, 2004



Kasumeat posted:

Wine quality is one of the biggest determinants as to how long it will keep once open. A cheap bottle will deteriorate very quickly, and a quality wine will hold for a long time.

Yes, but with some excpetions I think. Mugnier Clos de la Maréchale 2007 is a pretty good wine, but it died on me with 1/3rd left, cork in, in the fridge. Lesson learned, drink up! Most other wines survive this no problem, champagnes even keep most of their fizz. Last wine I did this with was a 2010 Musar, just put the decanter straight in the fridge, no cover. It was even better the next day, after getting up to temp of course.

Kasumeat posted:

Again, you're just plain wrong. I see this all the time at my work. If you really don't believe me, test it out for yourself with some wine split between the fridge and room temperature.

Yeah, it's pretty obvious, easy to test and backed by science basics.

taco show
Oct 6, 2011

motherforker


Grimey Drawer

Biomute posted:

If I wanted to get a book on wine, what should I get? The main contenders seem to be: The Oxford Companion to Wine, The World Atlas of Wine and The Wine Bible.

Does anyone have any experience with these books? I like reading about stuff, but in the digital age can these books compete with the likes of wine-searcher/wine-folly etc?

I’m self-studying for my level 1 CMS (any tips appreciated!!!!) and so far my books are

- wine bible- Karen MacNeil is super knowledgeable but can be hard to extract info quickly bc it’s a little more narrative and she’s sneakily opinionated lol. Lots of info about the history of a region, poo poo like how sherry is made, producers to look for, etc.
- windows on the world - CHARTS!! I think it’s a little quicker to find reference info in here but there’s not as much color. I usually read this and wine bible together
- world atlas - dope and I like maps and once you start studying more it makes a big difference to know the geography of where a thing comes from so it’s a good thing to have on hand
- wine folly - pretty charts but I find her online material a little more thorough than the book. It’s nice for showing my friends who are a little newer to wine or if I need a grid of things I should be “expecting” to taste or smell

I also read a TON of free articles from wine publications but it can be hit or miss if they have the level of detail I’m looking for. Also, many top regions (Spain in particular is amazing at this) have websites where they explain their methods or terroir or have links to the wine maker’s websites to dig up technical notes.

PT6A
Jan 5, 2006



I like Jancis Robinson's website, personally. She seems to curate stuff from a lot of different sources, feature a lot of different and surprisingly in-depth articles written by people who seem to know their poo poo, and the tasting notes are fairly reliable for me. It's a bit spendy, though, but, wine, am I right?

Crimson
Nov 6, 2002


Kasumeat posted:

Wine quality is one of the biggest determinants as to how long it will keep once open. A cheap bottle will deteriorate very quickly, and a quality wine will hold for a long time.

That's very misleading. Older, higher quality Burgundy will die quicker than a bottle of cheap, new Cabernet.

Also, to taco show, I highly recommend joining Guildsomm and using their study guides. They're fantastic, and speak to the material that will be tested very well.

poop dood
May 31, 2011

$#$%^&@@*!!!


Level one is easy as hell. Just pay attention during the lectures and you’ll do fine. I’m a lazy fuckup who never learned how to study and I passed just fine. It’s mostly just the Six Hundred American Dollars that they want from you.

Kalenden
Oct 30, 2012


Hi,

For New Year, we are doing a take-away easy to prepare gastronomic menu and now I’m looking to combine some beverages with it, for two persons. What would you recommend? We have a fairly varied cellar (though some notable wines are lacking) and willing to be adventurous. I’ll propose my own idea but I’d definitely like to hear specific recommendations! Pictures are here: The courses are as follows (with each course divided by a line and posted as the menu is online with my additions in brackets since it is translated from Dutch)):

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Lobster salad

grapefruit - fregula - apple - candied tomato - cocktail sauce

////////////////////////////////

‘Cappuccino’ of ground chicory - scallops - chive cream

Toast of chicory, bacon and Reypenaer [type of cheese]

////////////////////////////////

Brill [Fish, similar to Turbot] 'à la nage' with Zeeland mussels, gray shrimps and chestnut mushrooms

Foamy crustacean sauce

////////////////////////////////

Crispy fried veal cheek and thymus [ also known as neck sweetbread ; veal sweetbread]

Mousselines of celeriac and parsnip - croquettes of polenta -

spring rolls of forest mushrooms - sauce of Porto

////////////////////////////////

Apple pie from the oven with figs, raisins and pistachios

'Globe' of bitter chocolate with speculaas ice cream

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

I was thinking of starting of with a Champagne, taking that with the lobster as well. Could you suggest multiple good options in this area? After, for the scallops and Brill I am guessing a good dry mineraly white, type Bourgogne, type Meursault, Puligny Montrachet. What do you think? Could you give other and/or more specific suggestions? For the veal cheek, I was thinking a more powerful wine, type St Joseph, Chateauneuf du Pape or even Spanish Roda I, Pintia… For the dessert, we are open to anything. Would Madeira be a good fit?

Again, I am open for all suggestions from your side, since I'm not 100% sure what my cellar still has and hasn't. Also, any advice on what to do with the open bottles? We are unlikely to finish all of them!

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Furious Lobster
Jun 17, 2006



Grimey Drawer

Kalenden posted:


I was thinking of starting of with a Champagne, taking that with the lobster as well. Could you suggest multiple good options in this area? After, for the scallops and Brill I am guessing a good dry mineraly white, type Bourgogne, type Meursault, Puligny Montrachet. What do you think? Could you give other and/or more specific suggestions? For the veal cheek, I was thinking a more powerful wine, type St Joseph, Chateauneuf du Pape or even Spanish Roda I, Pintia… For the dessert, we are open to anything. Would Madeira be a good fit?

Again, I am open for all suggestions from your side, since I'm not 100% sure what my cellar still has and hasn't. Also, any advice on what to do with the open bottles? We are unlikely to finish all of them!

What's your price range?

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