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direspoon
Jul 8, 2006

Is that a spoon around your neck, or are you just happy to see me?



Thanks for the advice, guys. Once I pick something up and try it out I'll post a trip report.

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Deleuzionist
Jul 19, 2010

we respect the antelope; for the antelope is not a mere antelope




Welcome to the collection Bro. You'll not be feeling the kiss of air for a while.


Failed twice two days ago. At a whisky bar in Vilnius I tried a Douglas Laing Old Malt Cask series Littlemill 20yo (cask 9443), which turned out to be a very taffy experience (not particularly creamy or sweet taffy even) that didn't change almost at all after water. It was ok but 'ok' in a 20yo whisky is always a disappointment. After that I tried a 'young & feisty' Douglas McGibbon Caol Ila, which was a ball of smoke and soot and nothing much else going on. A bit of a bummer those two, but apparently the universe was quick to make amends as on the plane back home chance seated me next to an absolutely charming woman of my age who turned out to be good company for the flight.

NightConqueror
Oct 5, 2006
im in ur base killin ur mans

Wow, nice find. I'm a big fan of Clynelish, and I would kill to try an old Brora. How do the prices for Broras compare to other dead distillers like Rosebank or Port Ellen?

Deleuzionist
Jul 19, 2010

we respect the antelope; for the antelope is not a mere antelope


NightConqueror posted:

Wow, nice find. I'm a big fan of Clynelish, and I would kill to try an old Brora. How do the prices for Broras compare to other dead distillers like Rosebank or Port Ellen?
Current Brora shop and auction prices would hint that the party where Brora was nicely cheaper to buy vs. Port Ellens of equal quality has come to an end some time ago and Brora will be at PE prices next year latest. The Rare Malts releases from around '72 that are IIRC heavy peat hitters have already gone the way of PE with price tags of over a thousand pounds easy, no doubt partly because Whiskyfun rated one of them at 97 points with glowing praise all over.

I've only tried one Brora, the 2003 release, and it made such an impression on me I simply had to have a whole bottle for myself although it does cut deep in the wallet.

Sperglord Firecock
Feb 20, 2011

Euphoria is experienced most firmly at the state of a curve at 80+mph and you don't know if you're gonna end up wearing these stupid fucking pants or not

Oven Wrangler

I don't really have a lot of money to blow on booze, but when I do try to pick up scotches, I try to pick up something at least okayish.

Like recently, I picked up a Glenmorangie 12 year Nectar D'Or. Never had it before, but I liked the taste of it. Any similar experiences from you lot?

Also, Cutty Sark is a surprisingly drinkable cheap blended scotch.

Dick Nipples
Feb 27, 2011

Clear alcohols are for rich women on diets.


GunganRevenge posted:

I don't really have a lot of money to blow on booze, but when I do try to pick up scotches, I try to pick up something at least okayish.

Like recently, I picked up a Glenmorangie 12 year Nectar D'Or. Never had it before, but I liked the taste of it. Any similar experiences from you lot?

Also, Cutty Sark is a surprisingly drinkable cheap blended scotch.

Monkey Shoulder makes a good, decently priced scotch blend as well.

Deleuzionist
Jul 19, 2010

we respect the antelope; for the antelope is not a mere antelope


Reintroducing myself to Aberlour A'Bunadh. I bought this one around a year ago after finishing one from batch 39 which I liked enough for a repeat purchase.

Aberlour A'Bunadh batch 41 59%
Neat: vanilla, sulphur, dehydrated plumes, high ABV makes difficult to nose. Adding a few drops of water which already gives it a bit more life. Fatty wax smell, not candley or stuck up like I remember the Clynelish 1993 distillers ed. being. Am I wrong or is there a bit of salinity creeping up there? Will have to see that with more water. If it is there, it's probably peat influence. Lipstick and something nutty that will probably become more clear with added water. Savoury tomato sauce. A wave of oloroso on the tongue, dates and molasses, sweeter and fruitier than PX casked ones. Starts to fade a bit too soon, a lingering aftertaste stays but there is some richness missing - a slightly hollow body. Some rubber at the end. Adding two teaspoons of water. More salinity now, and the whisky has become more muddy in the glass. No wonder it is bottled at cask strength. A bit more nail polish remover now. No longer quite as sweet but a more round aftertaste develops. Something like dried fruit with some salmiak. Speysideish fruit whiff all of a sudden, that nectarine/mango thing. I've nearly missed the peat burn completely but there it is. On the final mouthful a satisfying winegum/mead-like uniform taste that stays for a while. This is obviously one of the whiskies that benefits a lot from having been in the glass with some water for a while. There was at least a good five minutes if not ten between my penultimate and final sips and I consider the last mouthful the best. It didn't even leave behind any unpleasant rubberiness or sulphur.

Deleuzionist fucked around with this message at Sep 22, 2013 around 15:36

KhyrosFinalCut
Dec 16, 2004

Get it?


enjoying an old overholt manhattan

InequalityGodzilla
May 31, 2012



I'll admit I'm a rookie when it comes to whisk(e)y so I don't really know how to compare and contrast them in technical terms but I'm aiming to change that. I'm a big fan of both Jameson and Crown Royal, could anyone give me some recommendations based on those tastes or tell me what those actual tastes are so I know what to look for?

spankmeister
Jun 15, 2008






Slippery Tilde

Not trying to be a dick, but those are both very lacking in the flavour department. So I'd suggest branching out a little, starting with something like Balvenie Doublewood or Highland Park 12. Those are both still pretty approachable but pack a bit more punch.

Gregorio
Aug 8, 2010


spankmeister posted:

Not trying to be a dick, but those are both very lacking in the flavour department. So I'd suggest branching out a little, starting with something like Balvenie Doublewood or Highland Park 12. Those are both still pretty approachable but pack a bit more punch.

Someone also mentioned the Glenmorangie Nectar D'or, I found my Lasanta (Sherry cask finish) a good intro to that style too. Obviously no sherry bomb but has a fair bit more flavour than Jameson and Crown Royal as well. For affordable intros and a way to see the differences a finish can make that Glenmorangie range is pretty decent.

KhyrosFinalCut
Dec 16, 2004

Get it?


Gregorio posted:

Someone also mentioned the Glenmorangie Nectar D'or, I found my Lasanta (Sherry cask finish) a good intro to that style too. Obviously no sherry bomb but has a fair bit more flavour than Jameson and Crown Royal as well. For affordable intros and a way to see the differences a finish can make that Glenmorangie range is pretty decent.

And anytime these come up I have to endorse Quinta Ruban (port finished Glenmorangie in that line) as well.

How do you feel about Johnny Black?

InequalityGodzilla
May 31, 2012



spankmeister posted:

Not trying to be a dick, but those are both very lacking in the flavour department.
Oh, don't worry about it. Like I said I'm very much a rookie when it comes to whisky. Only turned 21 about a year ago but whisky has been my drink of choice since I was around 16 so I figured I owed it to myself to experiment a bit more rather than just buying a bottle of Jameson 4-5 times a year. My understanding was that Jameson was more or less a mid level whisky, not really outstanding in any way but affordable, easily available and well enough made that it didn't taste like loving paint thinner (looking at you, Jack Daniels). So if I say or suggest something that makes it seem like I don't know poo poo or have poor taste you're totally fine in assuming that is actually the case. I'm here as an ignorant student before masters, or at the very least dilettantes.

KhyrosFinalCut posted:

How do you feel about Johnny Black?
I know I've had it before but I can't quite recall the flavor. I do seem to remember enjoying it though.


So the general vibe I'm getting is that I should give the Glenmorangie line a try to start with? Seems good to me. I'm a poor student ATM so I won't be going out and buying the whole thing at once but looking at their website the Quinta Ruban sounds really, really nice so I'll probably start out with that. Now to find somewhere that stocks it...

Edit:

KhyrosFinalCut posted:

enjoying an old overholt manhattan


Had my first ever Manhattan a few months ago while at a nice restaurant in Washington D.C. seemed a bit expensive for a single drink at $15 but after my first sip I instantly stopped regretting it. Wish I could remember what they used in it because drat that was a fine cocktail. I did catch some flak though because apparently it was what my grandmother used to drink. Taste in drinks runs in the family, I guess?

spankmeister
Jun 15, 2008






Slippery Tilde

Quinta Ruban is an excellent whisky, you won't be disappointed.

Troll Bridgington
Dec 22, 2011

Keeping up foreign relations.

Agreed. It's drat tasty. Definitely up there as one of my favorites.

Capt. Awesome
Jun 17, 2005
¡orale vato!

After not having any whiskey for awhile (besides the occasional scotch) I powered through a bottle of Bulliet Rye like it was my job a few weeks ago. I forgot how delicious it was.. and at $20/750ml at Trader Joes.. it may need to work it's way back into my regular rotation.

HOWEVER.

On a whim, I grabbed a bottle of Rittenhouse rye ($24 at my local liquor store).. first things first.. a sip by itself, as is. Holy crap. Its so spicy, and even has a little bit of a fruity flavor to it. Delicious. Threw an ice cube down, poured a little more on top and let it chill and dilute just a touch... even better. Just so smooth and easy to drink. It finishes a touch harsh, but the upfront flavors are so good, its easy to forget the finish.

I made a few old fashioned's, and it was just great. The spiciness of this really shines through, and it really elevated this drink. Manhattans are the same. My favorite though, was a Derby. Rye, grand marnier, sweet vermouth, and loads of lime. One of my favorite drinks, the Rittenhouse really has just made it that much better. Funny thing is, I ran out of vermouth.. when in a pinch? Use red wine. Holy poo poo.. what a drink. I actually like it better with the straight red wine than I do the vermouth. I think I may have found my new jam for awhile

I still love Bulleit Rye, and prefer it straight (not that I really drink it straight that much).. but Rittenhouse may just have it beat.

Slash
Apr 7, 2011



spankmeister posted:

Quinta Ruban is an excellent whisky, you won't be disappointed.

After determining that the Nectar D'Or is my new favourite whisky, I decided to try the Quinta Ruban.

I can't make my mind up on it, it has very strong flavours, much more overpowering than the delicate sweetness of the Nectar D'or. I do like the colour, it's a very distinctive dark orange.

I think this Whisky will take more tasting to form a proper opinion of, and perhaps could do with a drop of water to bring out the more complex flavours.

Inspector 34
Mar 9, 2009


When you all say "a drop of water" do you really just mean a drop? I know for sure that my pallet sucks and I'm terrible at distinguishing flavors from one another, but still I find a hard time believing that a single drop would be useful in changing the character of a whiskey. I tend to like a full sized ice cube with the WT101 or EV Single Barrel I buy regularly and no water at all with the scotches I like.

Do you guys think this is just a case of my pallet liking what it likes, or am I missing some big things in between the ice/no ice barrier?

Bolocko
Oct 19, 2007



Though I can't speak for others, for me "a drop of water" means 'a carefully-added nonspecific small amount of water'. You should experiment for yourself. At the end of everything, mind what you alone can taste in the drink and take it the way you like it. If someone else says a bit of water really brings out some quality but you prefer to take a thing neat, sure, try it their way, find out if your experience is similar, but by all means if you like a thing neat then drink it neat. Someone might try to give you grief for putting ice in your whiskey and you can ignore them.

Your palate will change with experience and it isn't more correct/incorrect now than it would be in thirty years.

Deleuzionist
Jul 19, 2010

we respect the antelope; for the antelope is not a mere antelope


When I talk about a few drops of water I usually mean it literally, at least with cask strength whiskys. Nosing it clean first, then adding just two drops or three usually opens the whisky a bit without affecting the clean nose/taste other than amplifying it. Beyond drops the amount to add depends entirely on the whisky and is found out by adding more gradually. With a bottle I don't know yet I usually start with a few drops, then go to nothing less than a 3/4 to a full teaspoon and keep adding similar size spoonfuls as the first one between sips until I get to the point where I say to myself "too much water". I find myself always sad if a cask strength whisky starts to lose its structure after one spoonful. The older the whisky the more care should be taken with water, adding maybe only 1/2 spoonful at a time.

Most easily available Scotch is watered to 40-48% so there adding just a drop or two won't produce as dramatic an effect as with cask strengths.

Here's Ralfy talking about water. Useful info all around with a bit of fun at the expense of water snobs included.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gjp8ETweF-8

edit: that was a lot of typos

Deleuzionist fucked around with this message at Sep 25, 2013 around 23:12

smn
Feb 15, 2005
tutkalla

kidsafe posted:

Yamazaki 12 ($50) or 18 ($150) depending on your budget. You may find Nikka whiskies as well, but they are even more expensive and IMO generally inferior.

Back when Yamazaki 18 was available for around 80 it was an awesome deal, with the recent prices I would go for Yoichi 15 over Yamazaki 18 and Yoichi 10/12 over Yamazaki 12 any day. Not too much experience on the Miyagikyos but I have good memories of their 12yo, should try it again some time.

KhyrosFinalCut
Dec 16, 2004

Get it?


For a cask strength whiskey, I generally pour a generous dram and let a reasonable size ice cube melt in it over time. Fun to feel the flavor evolve.

Missing Name
Jan 5, 2013

Here you go. Juicy Fruit. Happy?


Have we mentioned yet that Philadelphia is terrible? I am thoroughly regretting this bottle.

My dad introduced me to Glenfiddich, Glenmorangie and 1792. Wild Turkey 101, that was college. I still have an empty on my shelf for memories, such as "fuckit, the vending machines are out of cola and ginger ale, let's try Hawaiian Punch and Kentucky Gentleman." (FYI, the taste is somewhat worse than Kentucky Gentleman straight. It goes down red and comes up purple.)

Deleuzionist
Jul 19, 2010

we respect the antelope; for the antelope is not a mere antelope


Coming back to Brora and Port Ellen prices, since it's already for some years been mostly so that the official releases of both distilleries sell out pretty quickly and return to the market at a much higher price, it looks like year by year Diageo is looking to dip more of their beak into that pool of money. This year's Brora and PE officials sell for the outrageous starting prices of 750 and 1500 pounds respectively. They also have a very interesting Lagavulin 37 on the release line but the starting price is even more insane: 1950 pounds. As things stand it looks bloody unlikely my Bro will ever get another Bro to hang out with in the cabinet.

ChickenArise
May 12, 2010

POWER
= MEAT +
OPPORTUNITY
= BATTLEWORMS


Capt. Awesome posted:


I still love Bulleit Rye, and prefer it straight (not that I really drink it straight that much).. but Rittenhouse may just have it beat.

As a big fan of their Bourbon, the rye just doesn't do it for me. It's nice and drinkable and good, but at the price point I can get stuff (even things designated as bourbon) that has more of the 'rye' flavor I like. I'm glad to see you mention fruitiness though - I always see spicy as a flavor for rye, and while I definitely get that, I get fruitiness from many of them too. I find that to be more similar to the rye flavor I get from a rye IPA or something.

NovaLion
Jun 2, 2013

REMEMBER


This seems like the perfect place to ask, I'm sure you good folks can help me out. I'm looking to put together some groomsmen gifts that will include a personalized glass, and I want to include a glass of a decent whiskey (or whisky). The problem I'm facing is that the most I've expanded my taste horizons so far is the bottle of Yamazaki 12 I picked up here locally. I also don't know their tastes. I plan to pair the drink with a cigar, if that helps any. I have a pretty good budget to work with, and I want something that will really make a mark on the guys for a good while after. Do you have any suggestions? Would you recommend getting a decanter and having a good groomsmen ritual deal, or is there some kind of mini bottle I can put into a box with the rest of their gifts that would be a better fit? I have a pretty decent budget to work with, I'm open to all suggestions.

rxcowboy
Sep 13, 2008

I have slipped the surly bonds of Earth; fucked both a chick and her mom

I will get anal. Oh yes.

NovaLion posted:

This seems like the perfect place to ask, I'm sure you good folks can help me out. I'm looking to put together some groomsmen gifts that will include a personalized glass, and I want to include a glass of a decent whiskey (or whisky). The problem I'm facing is that the most I've expanded my taste horizons so far is the bottle of Yamazaki 12 I picked up here locally. I also don't know their tastes. I plan to pair the drink with a cigar, if that helps any. I have a pretty good budget to work with, and I want something that will really make a mark on the guys for a good while after. Do you have any suggestions? Would you recommend getting a decanter and having a good groomsmen ritual deal, or is there some kind of mini bottle I can put into a box with the rest of their gifts that would be a better fit? I have a pretty decent budget to work with, I'm open to all suggestions.

Honestly at this point I'd go with a good bourbon that can stand up to a cigar. I've smoked a couple of cigars in my day, and while they are good they wreck hell on your tastebuds so pairing a good scotch with them (even a "strong" scotch) would be a bit of a waste. I'd go with Knob Creek, Elmer Lee or Elijah Craig. Honestly nothing you're going to pair with a cigar is going to make a huge mark, they are going to be concentrating on the event and the cigar. Go with a bourbon, you'll save money and still make a good impression.

NovaLion
Jun 2, 2013

REMEMBER


I had a feeling that was the case. I was thinking something along the lines of having the drink prior to the ceremony, and the cigars after/during the reception. I doubt it would go over too well if I were to smell of smoke during the ceremony. None of us are especially big smokers, just the occasional celebratory stick.

Slash
Apr 7, 2011



Something super peaty should be able to stand up against a cigar killin your taste buds. Obviously it's less than ideal conditions for tasting whisky.

Something like Lagavulin or Laphroaig should still give a nice taste alongside a cigar.

Deleuzionist
Jul 19, 2010

we respect the antelope; for the antelope is not a mere antelope


In case of combined smoking and drinking I'd also go with something sweeter, a good bourbon or even a grain, rather than put the money into a single malt, especially since you mentioned people who don't smoke often and as a consequence can't ignore the taste and smell of the smoke like a habitual smoker.

If you plan to have the drink before the cigar then the sky's the limit really, or actually the shelves of the stores near you. What options are available?

NovaLion
Jun 2, 2013

REMEMBER


Right now, I'm in Japan. The wedding itself will be in Arizona so I imagine there is quite a bit physically available. I'd limit the budget to something around $750 at most. I'd really like to avoid walking into a liquor store and just looking around without a clue.

KhyrosFinalCut
Dec 16, 2004

Get it?


So when I've done the scotch and cigar thing, I have opted for a mild scotch -- while it's true some kind of peat monster will stand up to a cigar, if you have 4 glasses poured of a harsh smokey islay in the same small space, that's going to, IMX put out enough in the air that this may interere with the appreciation of the cigar flavor.

I've really enjoyed Edradour 10 in this spot, it's a really clean and surprisingly sweet highland.

If you're going with a bourbon or other american whiskey -- Bernheim Wheat Whiskey is really punchy and has a strong cherry note that will cut through even an aggressive cigar.

Fuzzy Pipe Wrench
Nov 5, 2008

MAYBE DON'T STEAL BEER FROM GOONS?

CHEERS!
(FUCK YOU)


Is there a single standout corn whiskey? I've never tried any and figure it's time.

JewKiller 3000
Nov 28, 2006

by Lowtax


Good corn whiskey is labeled bourbon. Bad corn whiskey is labeled corn whiskey.

BTW, peat tastes bad. Bourbon tastes good. If you agree with this post, I highly recommend you try some FOUR ROSES SINGLE BARREL. The Small Batch is good too.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

JewKiller 3000 posted:

Good corn whiskey is labeled bourbon. Bad corn whiskey is labeled corn whiskey.

BTW, peat tastes bad. Bourbon tastes good. If you agree with this post, I highly recommend you try some FOUR ROSES SINGLE BARREL. The Small Batch is good too.
Unironically, Four Roses Single Barrel OE** Single Barrel is 75% corn. Peat is fine.

LogisticEarth
Mar 28, 2004

Someone once told me, "Time is a flat circle".


Not sure if this is the right thread for this question, but I figure someone here might have some insight. I just got back from a trip to the Finger Lakes in New York state, which has a couple upstart distilleries. We stopped by Myers Farm distillery, which has apparently just opened in the recent past. Among other purchases the clerk informed me that the bottle of their rye I picked up was the first one they ever sold to the general public, as they had released it that morning. Is that notable enough to hold onto the bottle, or should I drink it? I assume that would depend if the distillery takes off.

spankmeister
Jun 15, 2008






Slippery Tilde

LogisticEarth posted:

Not sure if this is the right thread for this question, but I figure someone here might have some insight. I just got back from a trip to the Finger Lakes in New York state, which has a couple upstart distilleries. We stopped by Myers Farm distillery, which has apparently just opened in the recent past. Among other purchases the clerk informed me that the bottle of their rye I picked up was the first one they ever sold to the general public, as they had released it that morning. Is that notable enough to hold onto the bottle, or should I drink it? I assume that would depend if the distillery takes off.

Unless it actually says that on the bottle I'd just drink it. It might gain value as the first production run but any potential buyer would have to take your word for it being the actual first bottle ever.

Buy the thing, not the story.

LogisticEarth
Mar 28, 2004

Someone once told me, "Time is a flat circle".


Well I did save the time-stamped receipt and was considering asking the distillery for some kind of letter. I just know next to nothing about whiskey collection outside of the obvious and didn't know if it was worth any if that trouble.

Tigren
Oct 3, 2003


LogisticEarth posted:

Well I did save the time-stamped receipt and was considering asking the distillery for some kind of letter. I just know next to nothing about whiskey collection outside of the obvious and didn't know if it was worth any if that trouble.

Whiskey collecting is worth a bit if you find the right ones. A random microdistillery in New York is not that. Drink it , enjoy it, buy more if you like it. But don't expect it to be worth any more than you paid.

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bunnyofdoom
Mar 29, 2008



The only value a whiskey should have is the value to your tastebuds. My principal is always, if I have a choice between collecting whiskey and drinking it, I go with drinking it.

My Dad drinks his whiskey except for his mini collection. He has about 50 minis of different scotches, with the expectation that at his wake, my brother and I will drink them all to toast him.

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