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TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Anyone else going to WhiskyFest SF on Friday and want to meet up? I'd link the the event page, but it's sold out now.

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TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Kenning posted:

Oh thank god. poo poo, now I need to choose between this and a single village Oaxacan mezcal for my next fancy bottle of liquid smoke lightly flavored with spirit.
Laphroaig QC and 10yr really have similar levels of smoke, at least in my estimation. The difference to me is 10yr has more iodine/medicine vs QC's purer wood smoke. QC tastes slightly more mineral and sweet as well. In general I find Laphroaig, Ardbeg and Kilchoman's house styles to be very similar.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Highland Park smoke is very one-dimensional to me...like I'd imagine coal or coke smoke. If you want to try something as challenging as Laphroaig, but for different reasons, then I'd look at the new Springbank 12yr Cask Strength. It has brine, smoke, sulphur (burnt match heads), and a good amount of sherry influence. One of the most unique tastes in all of the scotch whisky industry.

I also never hesitate to suggest the various Compass Box blends. Peat Monster (not really all that monstrous) has the characteristic Islay peat and a lot of Speyside fruitiness. Spice Tree, Oak Cross, Great King Street...pick one, you can't really go wrong.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Not sure what Dalmore's plans are for Gran Reserva, but it might be replaced by the born-again Cigar Malt. For that $75-100 range, I do like the Diageo Distillers Edition malts in general (in before anti-ACE sentiments.) Caol Ila, Talisker, Cragganmore in particular are quite good...and this is coming from someone who doesn't like the standard Talisker that much. Oban 18yr is still fairly available for now as well... drat I fee like a shill for Diageo now.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

kaldas posted:

They've released both 14 year and 17 year bottles. Haven't personally tried the 14.
I expect the 17yr to be significantly more candied and almost saccharine sweet since it's derived from 15yr single barrels that didn't make the cut.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

coronaball posted:

What are the major differences between Laphroaig 10 and the Quarter Cask, other than price? Winter is coming, and with it the need for a bottle of peaty scotch in my liquor cabinet.
Laphroaig 10yr: More medicinal, more earthy peat, overall sweet with some brine.
Laphroaig Quarter Cask: More wood, cleaner peat smoke, sweeter, more mineral taste.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Dalmore and Macallan are masters of PR and they stir up the hype machine with novel 'vintage' replicas like these or ever more expensive super-old releases. I believe the third and final bottle of Dalmore Trinitas recently sold for a record value. A while ago Macallan actually got in trouble because they based an entire release on what ended up being a forgery.

Richard Paterson, Dalmore and White&Mackay's master blender, is very good at his craft. Dalmore King Alexander and Jura's peated offerings are some of my favorites, but I very much doubt the Shackleton release is worth the premium.

TobinHatesYou fucked around with this message at Nov 5, 2011 around 15:34

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

That's a pretty ordinary selection besides the Arran offerings. I would take this opportunity to indulge in the older expressions on that list, since practically everything else is available at a high-end grocer or spirits shop.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Aglet56 posted:

Picked up my first bottle of Laphroaig 10 year, and holy cow I don't know why I wasn't drinking more Scotch before. Just two days and a couple of glasses later and this may be my favorite liquor ever. Smokey and delicious and
When that bottle runs dry, pick up Quarter Cask to compare. At least to me it amps up more of the good.

I stopped by the whisky shop tonight and watched someone come in, beeline to the glass case and tell the clerk to ring up two bottles of Port Ellen 9th Release. He was in and out in about 5 minutes, didn't even browse the rest of the selection.

As for me I grabbed a bottle of Hazelburn 12yr and Compass Box Hedonism. I was glad to learn that Hazelburn has only the faintest wisp of sulphur/burnt matches, unlike traditional Springbanks. Hedonism of course is a different beast altogether. It's a puffy marshmallow...there is some bourbon-like quality to the whisky, but it's so much more subtle and rounded.

TobinHatesYou fucked around with this message at Nov 22, 2011 around 06:37

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

I tried Four Roses Single Barrel and Small Batch at WhiskyFest is that I perceive the Single Barrel to be sweeter, but the interwebs generally says otherwise. I asked Rutledge about it and he agreed with me, but he may have just been saying that to be polite. I find Single Barrel to be their best expression by far assuming consistency.

TobinHatesYou fucked around with this message at Nov 23, 2011 around 08:09

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Jo3sh posted:

Whisky with my Dad after Thanksgiving dinner this evening:

Aberlour A'Bunadh - Sort of a toasty, sugary thing going on here. Nice and rich even with a little water. Kind of overpowering neat (nearly 60% ABV).

Balvenie 15 - I liked this a little less than the Aberlour. Kind of harsh to enjoy neat, I thought. With a long dash of water and a few minutes of rest, I found it had kind of a grassy aroma that was pretty pleasant.
A'bunadh seems to be a creative expression for Aberlour in that they don't really care about its consistency from batch to batch. On the other hand Balvenie 15yr Single Barrel is always the same...probably because the sweet notes overpower your tastebuds. There is a sort of irony here since A'bunadh is a vatting and the Balvenie is obviously sourced from just one cask.

I was surprised to find Lagavulin 12yr on the shelf at the local shop. It doesn't typically make it over here, so I couldn't resist...

TobinHatesYou fucked around with this message at Nov 27, 2011 around 11:34

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

mojo1701a posted:

Really? I was overseas about two months ago, and I kept seeing it at the duty-free, and thought I missed the chance when I came home and didn't get it (Instead, I bought a bottle of Jura Superstition, Ardbeg Blasda, a Balvenie 14 rumcask, and a small Glenfiddich 15). I went to a nearby LCBO and saw it, so now I'm actually thinking of picking it up if it's going to be for a limited time.
I imagine it'll be around enough...BevMo had tons when I went there. There was a ton of hype surround Ardbeg Alligator and Laphroaig Cairdeas, but both are still available on shelves here.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Alberta Premium being one of the exceptions, though even that doesn't have the same edge as American ryes for whatever reason.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Abel Wingnut posted:

I tried Peat Monster today and fell in love with Islays and the surge of smoke and the body high it induced. Didn't care for the Compass Box Asyla Blended.

Are there better options near that price with the same level of smoke? Would I like Laphroaig QC, Laphroaig 10, Lagavulin 16, or Ardbeg 10?
I like Peat Monster, but it's inappropriately named. It is a bit of a weakling versus any of those single malts you've listed. If I were to compare it to a single malt I would say it's most similar to one of those mildly peated Jura offerings.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Lagavulin 16 and Balvenie 15 Single Barrel have opposing effects on me. At Thanksgiving this year a bunch of friends who don't drink much alcohol were given Lagavulin to try. Luckily they were not put off by the smoke, and were very quick to mention how smooth it was with no alcohol burn. Balvenie 15 is more raw and does not mask the alcohol as well, as most single barrel expressions tend not to.

I suspect he would rate the Balvenie similar to Glenmorangie. While Talisker is quite different than Lagavulin, it does suggest he can handle a bit of peat smoke and brine.

If you want to be daring, you might consider splurging on Compass Box Hedonism. It's a blended Scotch grain whisky, so it's made very much like a bourbon...down to the cereal grains and distilling process. It is more mellow than bourbon...being aged in used barrels and I doubt there's any rye used Scotch grain recipes.

TobinHatesYou fucked around with this message at Dec 12, 2011 around 10:33

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

dbldown posted:

^^Love me some Springbank, I recommend it as often as I can to people that don't like peated whisky's.

In other news, I got a bottle of the 'new' unchill-filtered, no coloring added Bunnahabhain for Christmas.

Loving it! Its like the old Bunnahabhain that I liked plus an extra kick of Bunna goodness. Props to the distillery for making these changes, they're really paying off.
Springbank is an odd duck in that it's got a very heavy sulphur, burnt match arrival that puts people off more than the usual earthy peat. When I bring my bottle to tasting parties, it's always hard to warm people to it. Their Hazelburn releases on the other hand are general crowd pleasers.

Deanston was also given the 46% unchill-filtered treatment from Burn Stewart, just like Bunnahabhain. I've been meaning to try it, but my bottle rotation is quite unwieldy as is.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

spankmeister posted:

Absolutely, nothing wrong with glenlivet, but it doesn't hold a candle against HP, imho.
I don't know though...I think I'd choose the Glenlivet pack based on bang for the buck. $100 for three bottles vs. $115 for two. Glenlivet 18yr is no slouch and the 15yr French Oak is an interesting diversion (much like HP 15yr is a diversion from the rest of HP's core range, too bad it isn't included in the gift pack.)

TobinHatesYou fucked around with this message at Dec 29, 2011 around 13:43

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

[ts]xenophobe posted:

Curious if you could recommend a scotch I've had Oban 14, which I liked, Laphroaig (don't know the age it was one drink, bought for me) was too smokey for me. Currently been drinking bourbon: Noah's Mill and Willet Pot Still; Suntory Yamazaki 12yr.
There isn't anything quite like Oban. Oban is sort of like Single Malt's Greatest Hits as it starts out honey sweet, has the faintest bed of peat as well as salt/brine, finishes quite dry. It has tiny grits worth of wood spice as well.

Hazelburn 12 if you can find it and are willing to pay is also a fair mix of sherry sweetness plus heavy wood influence and seaside influence. Old Pulteney as well...it has a reputation for being 'salty,' but it's really not that extreme.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

5 perfectly suitable/drinkable single malts for getting your feet wet.

AnCnoc 12yr - Abundantly sweet, yellow fruits.
Glengoyne 12yr - Abundantly sweet, dark/red fruits.
Glenfarclas 10/12yr - A bit heavier/'bigger' and not as sweet. A hint of smoke, but not really.
Glenrothes Select Reserve - Also big and malty, some tart fruit / rind.
Glendronach 12yr - Smooth, Macallan-like sherry. Dark/red fruit.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

From that list I would consider the following...

Rich, sweet:
Aberlour 12yr
Balvenie 12yr Double Wood
Glenmorangie Quinta Ruban

Balanced:
Cragganmore 12yr
Glenlivet 16yr Nadurra

Beefier, more savory:
Jura 10yr
Dalmore 12yr

A bit of everything:
Oban 14yr

TobinHatesYou fucked around with this message at Jan 8, 2012 around 04:45

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Citizen Insane posted:

The A'bunadh is a personal favourite of mine, very very peppery with a sweet, honeylike finish. Tried a shot of the Lagavulin 16 and it was okay, but I didn't like the tail end of it at all. YMMV, of course. I'm a fellow Laphroaig fan, for the record.
First thing that comes to mind with regard to Lagavulin's finish is oysters, so it's definitely a love/hate sort of thing.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

biglads posted:

I have.

Didn't like it at all.
They've resorted to ACEing their whisky in ice wine barrels. I'm much more interested in Victoria Spirits's little 'Craigdarroch' project.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

With Redbreast 12yr, I found that leaving a half full bottle for several months to a year caused the whiskey to deteriorate badly. Drink it fast.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

wormil posted:

I've only had Four Roses Single Barrel once but it was fantastic. That was at a bourbon tasting with Jim Rutledge so in all likely hood it was a cherry picked bottle.
Indeed, I too had Single Barrel poured to me by Rutledge himself at a Whiskyfest event and I came to the same conclusion. It was so good it had to be cherry-picked.

Rutledge goes as far as saying Single Barrel and Small Batch taste nothing alike and none of the four reciper in Small Batch are the Single Barrel recipe. I can agree with that...I vastly preferred Single Barrel.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Zeno-25 posted:

Does anyone know what the story is on what happened to the Van Winkle company? I used to be able to get their 15yr and 10yr (107 proof) bourbon anytime I wanted from the nicer liquor store chain around here, now they haven't been able to get any of their products in decent quantity for the better part of a year and the prices for their stuff online have gone through the roof.
Whisk(e)y hype has ballooned in recent years and the fact that Van Winkle is the best wheated bourbon and one of the best bourbons aged longer than 10 years in the industry doesn't help with availability.

Also the Van Winkles don't own a distillery anymore. They take their recipe to Buffalo Trace to distill in smaller quantities...then you have to figure in the fact that fewer barrels make the cut at 15, 20 and 23 years. Stuff that doesn't make the cut is probably sold to smaller boutiques and blenders.

NightConqueror posted:

For the price, it's pretty great. Flavor is definitely a step up from Maker's Mark, and is on almost on par with Buffalo Trace (plus the bar by me sells it for $4.00 a glass).
Because the aforementioned Van Winkles are now impossible to get, my straight bourbon collection consists of Maker's, W.L. Weller's Reserve, Buffalo Trace and Four Roses Single Barrel. Nothing exotic, but I'm not really a bourbon drinker to start with.

TobinHatesYou fucked around with this message at Feb 3, 2012 around 09:20

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

wormil posted:

Beginner recs up in the OP.
Definitely Balvenie 12 Double Wood.

From left field:
Old Pulteney 12 might be a little less interesting than Oban 14 as West Highlands go, but at $35 from a place like BevMo, I think it warrants a recommendation.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

spankmeister posted:

For that money I think Glenlivet has the edge.

e: The speyburn is like the $5 handle of vodka of the single malts. It's like THE cheapest SM I think.
*shrug* I have a bottle of Speyburn 10yr in my cabinet. It's cheap, it's accessible...it should never be compared to a $5 handle of vodka. I'd directly compare it to AnCnoc 12yr if anything. Different distilleries, same owners, very similar profiles. For a non-whisk(e)y drinker, I'd definitely pour them Speyburn instead of Glenlivet, but that's me.

I'm also pretty sure I've seen single malts from 'secret distilleries' like Ileach and Finlaggan for less...as well as some other independents.

TobinHatesYou fucked around with this message at Feb 5, 2012 around 12:13

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

pork never goes bad posted:

The things you are saying about it are bad things, though. It barely tastes like a scotch, let alone a single malt, definitely doesn't have 12 years of barrel character no matter how long it actually spent in barrel. It's lack of whisky character may make it more accessible for a non whisky drinker, but why not just pour that person a bourbon and coke, or gin and tonic, or just vodka?
Since when are being cheap and accessible bad qualities on their own? And I said nothing of Speyburn not tasting like Scotch. What is that supposed to mean anyway? Caol Ila doesn't taste like Springbank doesn't taste like Glenrothes...what is Scotch *supposed* to taste like?

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

pork never goes bad posted:

Sorry - I didn't mean to imply that those were things you said. I still think that they are true statements about the Scotch. Speyburn is loving rank. It is absolutely the $5 Vodka handle of single malts.

For clarification - cheap and accessible are not necessarily bad qualities, only when they are to the detriment of other things (like tasting good, or at least ok) that we might want in our Scotch. Other whiskys at that price point do the cheap and accessible thing much better.
Different strokes for different folks. There are far more offensive single malts to me than Speyburn 10yr. For example, I'd rank it above Glengoyne 10yr which is $10-15 more (I love Glengoyne 17yr and vintage bottlings). I prefer Laphroaig Quarter Cask to Laphroaig 10yr, which I find skunky.

The experts don't seem to hate it either...at least Martine Nouet, Broom and the late Michael Jackson.

I'd personally describe Speyburn as the following: Young/clean, light and syrupy (honey), slightly heathery but not perfumy.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

smn posted:

I've got to comment on this - I've gone through one bottle of Speyburn 10 and it was very decent. Long time a go so I can't remember all the details but it most definitely wasn't a bad whisky. Somewhat sweet, malty and easy to drink - the bottle didn't last long.

But this isn't the first time I've heard people claim Speyburn 10 is really bad - I have to wonder if it is batch variance as I quite honestly don't recognize the descriptions from my own experiences.
Speyburn 10 is always very consistent. It's slightly boozy as all 10yr single malts tend to be, but it's a steal at $19.99. I like to think of it as AnCnoc 10yr...that's basically what it is

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

natsea posted:

I'm in the exact opposite boat. On my 21st I purchased a bottle of Quarter Cask and then a few months later I purchased Glenlivet 12. Looking back I really wish I had purchased another bottle of Quarter Cask. Any recommendations for my next purchase, or should I just go with Quarter Cask again?
I guess I'll say it before someone else does. Ardbeg Uigeadail jumps out as something peaty, but distinct from Laphroaig.

I personally quite enjoy Caol Ila DE as well, it's my favorite of all the ACE'd Distillers Editions.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

biglads posted:

I'd agree with spankmeister. There seemed to be a silly little game being played by Bruichladdich and Ardbeg recently where they'd run some of their newmake or whisky through a gas chromatograph and announce "The Peatiest Whisky Ever" with x+1 ppm of phenols.

I've tried some Octomore (can't remember which release) and also some of the Ardbeg Supernova. I'd say there are many better whiskies released by Bruichladdich & Ardbeg respectively.

It's a gimmick whisky really. Young, one-dimensional and expensive. It'll be an interesting dram but probably not a great one.

I felt this way without actually trying it, totally thinking the 167PPM would be gimmicky and overpowering. Well I tried it tonight and was pleasantly surprised. For a young whisky, it's extremely smooth...the wave of peat comes, it warms over your mouth slowly from top to bottom. It lingers for quite some time. Octomore's only faults are its barrel time and price...it really hasn't picked up enough additional complexity from the wood to compete with the peat.

It was definitely my favorite peated offering from the Bruichladdich table, beating out the Port Charlotte bottlings.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

I think when you literally make several dozen different expressions, some are bound to be misses. I don't think that's so much inconsistency rather than inevitability.

Don't most new distilleries start off making gins, rums, and other white spirits because its a way to make a profit short term while their brown spirits age?

Anyway the edition of Octomore I had was apparently the latest (4.1) and the most refined.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

To each his own, but I find Quarter Cask much more pleasant than the 10yr. I don't taste any more tar or fishy influence than the 10, but I do get a whole lot less medicine/bandaids. I get more fresh wood bonfire smoke instead of Islay peat smoke...Overall the whisky is sweeter to me and has a fresher mouthfeel...like clean mineral water. Quarter Cask is far more similar in profile to the 18 than the 10 is to anything else.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Deleuzionist posted:

How would you say the QC and the 18 are similar?

Nosing the empty glasses now, next to the 10 I can easily distinguish similar scents heavily accented in the QC (heavy bandaid replaced by heavy fresh wood), but compared to the two the lingering scent in the 18 glass doesn't remind me of either. The heaviest lingering aromas are: cream toffee, vanilla for the 18, iodine and a bit of salt water for the 10, and tarred wood for the QC.
I guess it's more that they are both more dissimilar to the 10yr than they are each other. The 10yr to me is slightly medicinal, heavy bandaid and the finish is slightly skunky.

There is no skunkiness in the 18yr, and there is so much more wood...it didn't remind me necessarily of old wood. The 18yr and QC are both much sweeter to me than the 10yr, and the peat dissipates as it dilutes in the mouth.

I had the 25yr and Ardmore 30yr recently as well, but it's hard for me to form an opinion on whiskies I'd likely never keep for myself.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

pork never goes bad posted:

Recently bought a bottle of the A'bunadh bottling #32 - will write up some notes. For those who like sherried drams, the A'bunadh is amongst the greatest. Glenfarclas has some exceptional sherried whiskies too, and the 12 is a perennial favorite on my shelf.

ETA - if you like Bruichladdich 12, try Jura. Same distilling team, and approach.
I had batch 37 of A'bunadh and it's still way too 'big' for me. In the Aberlour range, my pick is still the 18yr. Glendronach 15yr and 18yr are also fairly accessible sherry monsters...without low-medium peating in Glenfarclas.

Regarding Jura...is what you say actually true? Bruichladdich is on the west side of Islay and Jura is obviously across a small channel from Islay to the east. Jura is owned by White & Mackay while Bruichladdich is independent...

I guess what you say about style does run true to most distilleries under parent brands. For example the Inver House brands like Balblair, AnCnoc, and Old Pulteney all have an uncanny similar syrup sweetness to them.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Haverchuck posted:

Jesus Christ that's a good price for that, it's like three times that where I am. I had the opportunity to meet their master distiller John Campbell at a tasting event a couple of weeks ago. He was a cool guy but Beam Global had been carting him from event to event all day long and he looked as if he would rather have been napping in a hotel room.
There are rumors Diageo may just buy Beam Global for Sauza if they can't absorb Cuervo. I'm not sure if they are still talking or if things fell through, but it would be weird if Diageo owned three of the eight Islay distilleries as a consequence.

I'm sure they wouldn't mind owning a bigger piece of Bourbon County either.

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Ample posted:

Some people just like the taste of Pepsi.
We need the Pepsi Challenge with whiskies. In one unmarked glass is Pappy 15yr and the other contains W.L. Weller Special Reserve. Can you tell the difference?

TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

Hmm, I wasn't implying that someone should mix Pappy 15-20-23yr with soft drinks. I was just wondering how many people wouldn't be able to distinguish a $15 screw-cap bourbon from one that gets the community into a frenzy every year. Bottles of Pappy 15yr end up being chucked on eBay for >$200

Like this example from a K&L

Not quite the same...it's a handpicked cask strength single-barrel Four Roses vs Pappy 15yr. I'm surprised that so many people got it wrong. If you're a whisky freak, you should probably at least be able to identify the distinctive rye flavor in one and none in the other...

Speaking of which, the Pappy frenzy is *tonight* for me. Wondering if I should go for the 15yr ($70) or 20yr ($110).

EDIT: Looks like they had 7 bottles of 15yr, 4 of 20yr, 7 of 23yr split between three stores...and I sucked at pressing F5 so better luck next time!

TobinHatesYou fucked around with this message at Apr 12, 2012 around 05:21

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TobinHatesYou
Aug 14, 2007
Not Dangerous

wormil posted:

Beyond a certain point, price is no longer about taste but about scarcity and uniqueness.
With regard to Pappy, it's a unique situation right now. We are very near the last bottlings of Stitzel-Weller 20yr. The 15yr is now from spirit distilled at Buffalo Trace. Both expressions are equally scarce.

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