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Randomity
Feb 25, 2007

Careful what you wish,
You may regret it!


ColHannibal posted:

It would work wonderfully, properly done cast iron pan pizza is great, and by properly I mean using it like a pizza stone, not building a pizza in a cold pan.

Cast Iron pizza:



Preheated for 30min at 500, let broiler fire up, threw pizza in after another 5min, cooks in 4-6min.

Cast iron pan can work if you build a pizza in a cold pan. After doing that, pop it the stove on a burner turned up to High for a few minutes before putting the whole thing in a super hot oven. Never had a bad pizza made this way.

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PretentiousFood
Mar 13, 2009



ColHannibal posted:

Im surprised you can see the detail from all the way up on that high horse.

Are you familiar with wavelets? They're often called a "digital microscope" and can be used to extract insane amount of detail from an image. They're telling me that your pizza pie is, in fact, a pizza lie.


Exhibit A: Wavelet transform of image with 10% overlay of original image (for spacial reference). (Click for large, high-contrast)

Two successive 2-D wavelet transforms were applied to your image. The first horizontal details, and the second extracted vertical details from the first image. Since different substances reflect light differently due to their structure, it's possible to get a "signature" that's relatively unique for certain substances under certain lighting. Fortunately, there is crust that is both properly cooked and completely charred in your image. The above image demonstrates this because the signature in the blackened areas do not match those of the properly cooked ones.


Even that aside, you can plainly see that the cheese is burnt through and that the crust is scaling there. The technique is fine but I'm afraid this pizza is not. Also you are a big babby for pretending it's not burnt.


e: Exhibit B: Level 2 Haar wavelet transform.

PretentiousFood fucked around with this message at Oct 27, 2011 around 04:53

smarion2
Apr 22, 2010


Yeah I'm sure you can make great pizza with the cast iron and I'm sure you have done it plenty of times. However, that crust is burnt as poo poo.

It's not a big deal I'll call anyone a liar if they say they've never burnt something in their life.

Phadedsky
Apr 2, 2007



Just one quick thing. I just wanted to make sure that any pizza dough recipe will work with a cast iron pan or if I should be using a certain type. I'm hoping to make some pizza this weekend with it and I want to make sure that I don't mess up the dough.

Deathwing
Aug 16, 2008


glompix posted:

What do you do for sauce? I feel like our sauce is our weak point. We buy peeled, canned tomatoes and crush them, but it ends up a little too runny/pulpy for my liking. Still really good, though! Chicago style best style.

I've been using 6 in 1 tomatoes, along with garlic, olive oil, basil, etc. till it tastes right. They work great for spaghetti sauce and chili too...not quite fresh home-grown, but still way better than what I was buying at the grocery store, and cheaper.

Pizza from last week:


Not my best effort, accidentally used cheapo flour instead of the KA bread flour that was still sitting in the freezer...still tasted surprisingly good though

The dough was an NY-style recipe i've been using for a while that I grabbed off a pizzamaking.com post from someone named Essen1:

100% Flour
63% Water (lukewarm)
0.5% IDY
1% coarse Sea Salt
1.5% olive oil
2% organic sugar

Roughly (can't find the post right atm): Dissolve the sugar and salt in the water, then mix the yeast in with the flour and sift in with the water mixture. Mix with dough hook on speed 1 till it comes halfway together, then add the oil. Mix for 3 minutes on speed 2, rest for 20 mins, 6 mins more on speed 2, then finally 2 mins on speed 3.

Remove, divide, ball up, cover and put in the fridge overnight. Then re-ball and back in the fridge for another 10-12 hours. Take out 1.5-2 hours before you want to cook, on a floured surface covered with a damp towel.

Cooked at 500 (crappy electric oven) on one of the Fibrament pizza stones for maybe 8-10 mins total.

Elizabethan Error
May 18, 2006



ColHannibal posted:

Its only the flour on the outside, it is chewey with a slight crunch.
They make black flour that looks like burnt pizza crust? wow i gotta get some of that

SHAKY DEFENSE
Mar 4, 2005

anything but that

What's the largest batch of dough I can make out of one package of dry yeast? And do you have any tips or tricks when it comes to portioning and freezing the dough? I ask because I love making pizzas but hate making the dough in my tiny kitchen, so making as much as I can at once would be ideal for me.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



SHAKY DEFENSE posted:

What's the largest batch of dough I can make out of one package of dry yeast? And do you have any tips or tricks when it comes to portioning and freezing the dough? I ask because I love making pizzas but hate making the dough in my tiny kitchen, so making as much as I can at once would be ideal for me.

If you have time, you can do a shitload of dough with a packet of yeast. I make 4-6 8-10" rounds from my recipe, and I use uhhh I think 1tsp of yeast.

Also, if you make a starter with said packet of yeast and keep some going, you can pretty much have dough indefinitely as long as you keep feeding it.

Killer robot
Sep 6, 2010

REMEMBER ME!


I've been experimenting with pizza the last couple months, but I just branched out and tried that King Arthur Chicago style recipe tonight. Crammed into a 12" tri-ply skillet rather than a proper deep dish pan or cast iron skillet, but very satisfied.



I added a little pepperoni too, and used a sllightly larger can of whole tomatoes, crushing them and taking the puree they were packed in to make some sauce, which was poured over the tomatoes. If I retry this the main thing I plan to change (other than halving the recipe or something because this is way more pizza than I need) is to heat the pan a bit before it goes in the oven since the bottom could have stood to be a bit crisper.

Rand alPaul
Feb 3, 2010

Everyone has been traded to the Padres


Has anyone ever tried a Kettle Pizza? This seems like it would work, and would fit in my price range. It's basically a special hood you put on a Weber grill.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


Cast Iron Skillet pizza time!

Sausage, onions, peppers. Diced tomatoes instead of sauce.

This is after I took it out of the pan:


Admiral Goodenough
Nov 5, 2008

Ta gueule, laisse-moi finir.

Anyone know what to do with a cracked pizza stone? My dad has one that's nice and heavy, but it's broken in two right down the middle. Could you put the two pieces tightly together in the oven and just continue to use it?

I have no idea how he managed to break it

Nebula
Dec 30, 2004



Admiral Goodenough posted:

Anyone know what to do with a cracked pizza stone? My dad has one that's nice and heavy, but it's broken in two right down the middle. Could you put the two pieces tightly together in the oven and just continue to use it?

I have no idea how he managed to break it

Should be fine. I have a crappy one I keep in my oven all the time that has been cracked for 2+ years and it works fine for breads like ciabatta. I also use 2 pieces of thick cordierite for pizza and have no issues with the area where they meet.

Bubbacub
Apr 17, 2001



Having now tried flour, cornmeal, and parchment paper to get my pizzas on the stone, parchment paper wins hands down. It's faster, cleaner, easier, and doesn't make any scorched smells.

Walk Away
Dec 31, 2009

Industrial revolution has flipped the bitch on evolution.


Bubbacub posted:

Having now tried flour, cornmeal, and parchment paper to get my pizzas on the stone, parchment paper wins hands down. It's faster, cleaner, easier, and doesn't make any scorched smells.

Absolutely. Parchment paper is awesome for making pizzas on a stone. The only time that it will ever burn is if it hangs over the edge and actually touches the bottom of the oven. Otherwise all it does it turn a little brown and make your life easier. I still roll my dough out with cornmeal instead of flour because I like the texture, though.

I love this thread. It got us making our own pizza at home that people have told me was better than any pizza that they could buy . On top of that, it is really cheap and fun for the kids to help out with. Also, you can save lots of time by portioning and freezing your dough and sauce ahead of time.

Thanks, thread.

pim01
Oct 22, 2002



Walk Away posted:

Also, you can save lots of time by portioning and freezing your dough

I've got a really stupid question on this - do I freeze the dough immediately after kneading, or after letting it rise? I sort of suspect the cold will kill off the yeast so I should store after rising but have no idea if that's actually right.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



pim01 posted:

I've got a really stupid question on this - do I freeze the dough immediately after kneading, or after letting it rise? I sort of suspect the cold will kill off the yeast so I should store after rising but have no idea if that's actually right.

Either works, really.

Admiral Goodenough
Nov 5, 2008

Ta gueule, laisse-moi finir.

Nebula posted:

Should be fine. I have a crappy one I keep in my oven all the time that has been cracked for 2+ years and it works fine for breads like ciabatta. I also use 2 pieces of thick cordierite for pizza and have no issues with the area where they meet.

That's great news, he was pretty bummed about it. Thanks

Walk Away
Dec 31, 2009

Industrial revolution has flipped the bitch on evolution.


pim01 posted:

I've got a really stupid question on this - do I freeze the dough immediately after kneading, or after letting it rise? I sort of suspect the cold will kill off the yeast so I should store after rising but have no idea if that's actually right.

Yeah, I actually just buy my dough from the pizza place around the corner, but since that is the case it is safe to assume that the rough has already risen. But like Casu said, either way will work. If you want less waiting when it comes time to cook, you would likely want to let it rise first so you're not waiting for it to do so when you want to cook.

pim01
Oct 22, 2002



Ah cool, I'll freeze it risen then since I'm lazy . Cheers guys!

bee
Dec 17, 2008
Fitness Goal: To bench press at least one teenage Defiant Sally.

My boyfriend's got arthritis in his wrists, which makes kneading/mixing dough a bit painful for him. So he puts the mixture into a bread machine and it does a pretty sweet job of mixing it

Rand alPaul
Feb 3, 2010

Everyone has been traded to the Padres


Di Fara Pizzeria closed for having mouse poo poo in the kitchen.

This sucks, his videos on youtube are awesome.

Strabo4
Jun 1, 2007

Oh god, I am 'sperging all over this thread too!


I made my first-ever pizzas with a stone today, used the "lazy no-kneading" recipe on page one and a relative's homemade sauce and they were loving delicious. Sorry about the lovely quality, I just had my phone.


Canadian bacon and pineapple, but I made it a bit too thick so it didn't cook all the way through, it was delicious regardless.


Same as the first one, except I made it a lot thinner and added chopped onions and jalapeņos, gave just the perfect bit of extra flavor to the pizza.

Strabo4 fucked around with this message at Dec 18, 2011 around 09:03

Darval
Nov 20, 2007

Shiny.

So many amazing pizzas in this thread! And to think the Pizza I made friday was with premade dough

I like to think I have a legitimate excuse though. Had to take the girlfriend to the emergency room after work.

Radio Help
Mar 22, 2007

ChipChip? 


I've been using dough balls from my favorite pizza place for years now, but I got my very first stand mixer for Christmas this year so I'm gonna try and make my own. Any flour recommendations? Seems like the King Arthur perfect pizza flour mix would be the place to go, but should I just follow what Sir Alton Brown says and get their bread machine flour instead?

Shooting Blanks
Jun 6, 2007

Real bullets mess up how cool this thing looks.

-Blade


I've always just used King Arthur bread flour and it's turned out fine - truth be told, I have no idea what would make pizza flour any different (other than a higher price as a specialty item).

Keyser_Soze
May 5, 2009



Rand alPaul posted:

Has anyone ever tried a Kettle Pizza? This seems like it would work, and would fit in my price range. It's basically a special hood you put on a Weber grill.

That is a drat good idea. I would be all over one for my 22.5 if was priced at $50 instead of $130.

I cooked some small 8 inch pizza's on my weber for Xmas eve snacks. It went over very well and the pizza's were nice and smoky.

I used the two charcoal baskets and set up indirect heat and cooked a few small pies at around 12 minutes each on my pizza stone using parchment paper. You absolutely have to add wood chunks to get it over 600 degrees, basic chunk charcoal etc won't do it.

Cathab
Mar 3, 2004


At the risk of being chased outta this thread with pitchforks, I don't suppose anyone has a good gluten free pizza dough recipe? My wife's favorite food in the whole world is pizza and we used to love making home-made pizzas, however she's recently been diagnosed with a wheat intolerance that makes her violently ill if she consumes even a small amount

Any help would be extremely appreciated.

Bob Morales
Aug 18, 2006

This post is good to go


FogHelmut posted:

Cast Iron Skillet pizza time!

Sausage, onions, peppers. Diced tomatoes instead of sauce.

This is after I took it out of the pan:




That looks delicious. We have an oven in the kitchen at work, you're tempting my lunchtime decisions.

Cpt.Wacky
Apr 17, 2005


Radio Help posted:

I've been using dough balls from my favorite pizza place for years now, but I got my very first stand mixer for Christmas this year so I'm gonna try and make my own. Any flour recommendations? Seems like the King Arthur perfect pizza flour mix would be the place to go, but should I just follow what Sir Alton Brown says and get their bread machine flour instead?

I'd go with plain old bread flour until you feel like you're getting a consistent result. Then try the fancier stuff and see if you can tell the difference. $5 for 5 lbs is a lot cheaper than $8 for 3 lbs too. I don't know about you but I can only get AP and bread flour locally, no one stocks the fancier KAF stuff. Their pizza flour mix uses a blend of durum flour (higher protein) and AP flour, a dough conditioner, and a little baking powder. You could add baking powder yourself and find dough conditioner by itself online cheaper if you found it made a difference.

flyboi
Oct 13, 2005

agg stop posting


College Slice

My dough recipe (adopted/modified from Jeff Varasano's recipe to work with a hand mixer):

Makes enough dough for 2 pies and a thing of breadsticks
330g water
520g AP flour
18g salt
50g starter at 100% hydration

Mix ~75% of flour, all starter and water in bowl. Using the mixer let mix for ~6 minutes until fully blended and smooth. Cover and rest for 1 hour. Add salt and mix for another 6 minutes then work the remaining flour in by hand, kneading a total of 8-10 minutes. Turn dough out, separate and let rest another 40-60 minutes. Store in fridge for 1-6 days in lightly oiled & floured containers until fully risen. Before cooking set out to warm up before baking.

This dough is rather wet so kind of a pain to work with. I've found cornmeal to work best and working directly on the peel, shaking to make sure that it isn't stuck. I'm not a fan of parchment paper because it doesn't allow the stone to absorb moisture from the crust. I typically stretch the crust out, cook for ~20 minutes and then put my toppings on as I like a consistently crunchy pizza throughout. Also for stretching the dough you should work with it until it starts to shrink after stretching. Once it shrinks let the dough rest for 5 minutes and continue.

Deathwing
Aug 16, 2008


Cpt.Wacky posted:

I'd go with plain old bread flour until you feel like you're getting a consistent result. Then try the fancier stuff and see if you can tell the difference. $5 for 5 lbs is a lot cheaper than $8 for 3 lbs too. I don't know about you but I can only get AP and bread flour locally, no one stocks the fancier KAF stuff. Their pizza flour mix uses a blend of durum flour (higher protein) and AP flour, a dough conditioner, and a little baking powder. You could add baking powder yourself and find dough conditioner by itself online cheaper if you found it made a difference.

If you have the storage, the trick to getting the fancy stuff at a decent price is finding a distributor/bakery/someplace that otherwise sells in bulk that'll hook you up - putting in an order for 50 lbs of KA Sir Lancelot next week with a local place, works out to roughly $0.60/lb

lifts cats over head
Jan 17, 2003

Antagonist: A bad man who drops things from the windows.

I see some dough recipes calling for warm water, and some for cold water. Does the difference lead to difference in the final dough product? Or is it just preference?

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



lifts cats over head posted:

I see some dough recipes calling for warm water, and some for cold water. Does the difference lead to difference in the final dough product? Or is it just preference?

Depends on what kind of dough you're making. Warm water is essential if you're doing a fairly quick rise in order to activate the yeast quickly. It really doesn't matter, I don't think if oyu're doing an overnight rise in the fridge.

Angry Grimace
Jul 29, 2010

HEY YEAH BARK AT THE MOON


then discard two cards at random


Randomity posted:

Cast iron pan can work if you build a pizza in a cold pan. After doing that, pop it the stove on a burner turned up to High for a few minutes before putting the whole thing in a super hot oven. Never had a bad pizza made this way.

Let me reiterate that this works perfectly and is the way to go for a good Cast Iron crust. Three minutes is about the perfect amount of time, maybe a tad longer. The pizza starts to cook from the bottom up if you go way longer than that, but it's not too finicky.

The bigger problem is trying to convince Pizza Stone Guy that that it is even possible that such a pizza will taste better than say, Tombstone. Pictures of perfectly round pizzas seem to send Pizza Stone Guy into a state of seething semi-homicidal rage.

RyceCube
Dec 22, 2003


lovely cellphone pic of my pizza I made at lunch
http://imgur.com/V35GI

100%, Bread flour, 7.15 oz. (202.03 g.), (1 1/2 c. plus 2 T. plus 5/8 t.)*
63%, Water (at around 100 degrees F), 4.50 oz. (127.65 g.), (1/2 c. plus 2 t.)
1%, Oil, 0.07 oz. (2.03 g.), (a bit less than 1/2 t.)
1.75%, Salt (table salt), 0.13 oz. (3.55 g.), (a bit over 5/8 t.)
0.40%, IDY (instant dry yeast), 0.03 oz. (0.81 g.), (a bit over 1/4 t.)
Total dough weight = 11.88 oz. (336.66 g.)
Thickness factor (TF) = 0.105

Kneaded dough in mixer, then oiled it, and put it in a air-tight container in my fridge for about 24 hours. Let it warm up to room temperature for about two hours, and pre-heated my oven and pizzastone at 550 for an hour or so.

It's a really good recipe. Very airy, but crunchy and tasty dough.

oRenj9
Aug 3, 2004

Who loves oRenj soda?!?


College Slice

I made pizza for lunch too!



Dough:
310g King Arthur bread flour
245g filtered water (105°) with 20g of sugar and ~5g IDY
5g baking powder
2 tbs EV olive oil.

Sauce:
3 garlic cloves, 1 carrot, stalk of celery, 1/2 white onion - all diced
Sweat in 2tbs of butter
Add 16oz can of whole tomatoes
Warm, then move to blender
Add pinch of salt and MSG, a fuckton of basil, parsley, pepper, and red pepper flakes, and a bit of rosemary and thyme. (note: units of measurement may vary depending on interpretations)
Blend in 2tbs of EV olive oil.
Puree until smooth
Note: if you like meat and are planning on using this sauce without any sort of meat on your pizza, add a bit of beef bouillon to round out the flavor.

This should make enough dough for 2 ~14"x7" pizzas and enough sauce for, well, a lot more pizzas.

Stretched, docked, then topped with Sargento provolone and mozzarella mix, a bit of pepperoni and a ton more basil and red pepper flakes. Cooked at 500°F for 9 minutes on a 24"x12" unglazed travertine tile, using parchment paper under the pizza since I don't have a peel.

Edit: oh yeah, put the basil underneath the cheese or it will burn like mine did .

oRenj9 fucked around with this message at Jan 1, 2012 around 19:29

Ghost of Reagan Past
Oct 7, 2003

rock and roll fun


I had some leftover dough from making Peter Reinhart's pain a l'ancienne baguettes, so I decided to make a pizza with it. Pretty simple stuff, but the crust is amazing with this. Some tomato sauce (I don't remember what I put in it), mozzarella, and venison sausage. Here's the recipe for the dough.

100% bread flour (use King Arthur if you aren't already)
2% salt
.7% instant yeast (I used active dry yeast because it's all I have; don't worry about activating it if you use it...I didn't)
79% ice-cold water

It makes a very wet dough; mix it in a bowl or mixer. You can't knead it. I mixed for about 6 minutes or so. Throw it in the refrigerator overnight, covered. Just pull it out about 3 hours before you want to bake it; the recipe doesn't call for proofing or punching or anything. Wait till it doubles before you divide and bake it, though. 27 ounces of flour, according to Peter Reinhart, will get you about 6-8 pizzas.

indoflaven
Dec 10, 2009


So does everyone overseas have a scale? How do you measure like that without one?

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Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


You can get a cheap scale for like 10 bucks and a nice digital one for $30 or $40. It's worth it.

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