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flyboi
Oct 13, 2005

agg stop posting


College Slice

indoflaven posted:

So does everyone overseas have a scale? How do you measure like that without one?

Not too expensive and accurate +/-1G http://www.amazon.com/EatSmart-Prec...25562529&sr=8-1

Just throw a thing of tupperware on it and measure away!

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pim01
Oct 22, 2002



Plus measuring by weight is actually easier than measuring by volume - chuck stuff in the bowl, hit Tare, chuck the next batch of stuff in. Nicer than using three measuring cups to get 2 3/4 cup .

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Yeah a kitchen scale is the best investment I've made in years and years.

Nephzinho
Jan 24, 2008



flyboi posted:

Not too expensive and accurate +/-1G http://www.amazon.com/EatSmart-Prec...25562529&sr=8-1

Just throw a thing of tupperware on it and measure away!

I got this one about a year ago and it still measures spot on and I've only replaced the batteries once. Really helps you get consistent results with any baking.

Phiberoptik
Dec 22, 2003


I want to start experimenting with making my own pizza sauce. Anyone got links to good recipes?

Niagalack
Aug 29, 2007

No half measure.

His Divine Shadow posted:

Yeah a kitchen scale is the best investment I've made in years and years.

I am off to buy one today. I use fresh baker yeast and drat I am having a hard time making conversion from dry yeast to fresh baker yeast...

Elim Garak
Aug 5, 2010



Phiberoptik posted:

I want to start experimenting with making my own pizza sauce. Anyone got links to good recipes?

I can give you my recipe.

1 Box Pomi strained tomatoes
1 6 oz. can tomato paste
6 oz. water
1 small onion, diced
1 clove garlic, crushed
1 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp honey
1 tbsp oregano
1 tsp marjoram
1 tsp basil
1 tsp dried mint
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper

You can either make it a day in advance and let it sit overnight covered in your refrigerator or make it the day of and simmer it for an hour. I'm pretty much always a last minute person so I simmer it. It makes enough for two pies with a little left over.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


I go the simple route with my pizza sauce

- Can of tomatoes, drained (whole or diced)
- Heavy pinch of kosher salt
- 3 or 4 fresh basil leaves
- Blend

Sometimes I add a clove of garlic, sometimes I don't.






Someone heard I like pizza and gave me one of these for Christmas:




It cooks slower than using a stone, and it's all enclosed so the top kinda gets steamed. However, the crust on the bottom comes out pretty decent. I'm trying to find some other things to use it for because I do prefer my stone.

GWBBQ
Jan 2, 2005



Anyone else made beer dough? Simple recipe:

3 cups flour
2tsp salt
1 cup beer

mix, knead, let sit for 10 minutes then let rise for 3 days at 45F

I've made it with a couple of homebrews and with a few microbrews, both at home and at a restaurant where we know the owner well enough to have the privilege of using the coal oven from time to time. A good place to start is making a spicy pizza with a hoppy beer in the dough, I love pepperoni and jalapeo on crust made with Stone Levitation. I've also done imperial stout crust with sweet and spicy sausage, and Ithaca Flower Power with sweet sausage and sweet peppers.

Also, BJ's wholesale sells a pizza stone/peel/tray kit cheap, I think mine was $16. Not a huge stone, but at least 16 or 18 inches.

Cathab posted:

At the risk of being chased outta this thread with pitchforks, I don't suppose anyone has a good gluten free pizza dough recipe? My wife's favorite food in the whole world is pizza and we used to love making home-made pizzas, however she's recently been diagnosed with a wheat intolerance that makes her violently ill if she consumes even a small amount

Any help would be extremely appreciated.
Target sells a kit in their gourmet food section, I bought it on a whim when it was $2. It doesn't rise and doesn't really taste like any dough you've eaten, but I could get used to the taste if I had to.

angor
Nov 14, 2003
teen angst

FogHelmut posted:

It cooks slower than using a stone, and it's all enclosed so the top kinda gets steamed. However, the crust on the bottom comes out pretty decent. I'm trying to find some other things to use it for because I do prefer my stone.

Crepes?

Nephzinho
Jan 24, 2008



angor posted:

Crepes?

That looks like it has an inward lip, making crepes you really need the opposite so that you can dip the cooking surface into the batter. Unless you want to make thick crepes like some kind of barbarian.

Quesadillas would probably go well in that thing. Or massive pancakes. Anything flat, circular, and you would have trouble flipping once you pass a certain diameter.

pim01
Oct 22, 2002



FogHelmut posted:

I go the simple route with my pizza sauce

- Can of tomatoes, drained (whole or diced)
- Heavy pinch of kosher salt
- 3 or 4 fresh basil leaves
- Blend

Sometimes I add a clove of garlic, sometimes I don't.


This is exactly what I do, but I add half a ball of mozzerella. Having some cheese in the sauce is nice .

It's great cause you just chuck everything into the blender, pulse it a few times and your sauce it's ready to go. It'll cook just fine on the pizza.

Daedalus Esquire
Mar 30, 2008


FogHelmut posted:





I'm trying to find some other things to use it for because I do prefer my stone.

I don't know how DIY you are, but maybe if you can figure out a way to remove the hinge you'd have a decent electric skillet. If the top half is heated also, then you'd have two skillets that store away pretty small. You'd be a hero at cooking breakfast on that thing.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


Daedalus Esquire posted:

I don't know how DIY you are, but maybe if you can figure out a way to remove the hinge you'd have a decent electric skillet. If the top half is heated also, then you'd have two skillets that store away pretty small. You'd be a hero at cooking breakfast on that thing.

Hmm, I wonder if it could do a quiche.

Rand alPaul
Feb 3, 2010

Everyone has been traded to the Padres


You could probably make a really awesome Quesadilla with that.

Darval
Nov 20, 2007

Shiny.

Or a frittata, but I guess that's similar to a quiche.

Radio Help
Mar 22, 2007

ChipChip? 


GWBBQ posted:

Anyone else made beer dough? Simple recipe:

3 cups flour
2tsp salt
1 cup beer

mix, knead, let sit for 10 minutes then let rise for 3 days at 45F

I've made it with a couple of homebrews and with a few microbrews, both at home and at a restaurant where we know the owner well enough to have the privilege of using the coal oven from time to time. A good place to start is making a spicy pizza with a hoppy beer in the dough, I love pepperoni and jalapeo on crust made with Stone Levitation. I've also done imperial stout crust with sweet and spicy sausage, and Ithaca Flower Power with sweet sausage and sweet peppers.

I'll have to try your recipe next time. I used King Arthur Flour's quick-rise beer crust recipe (subbing Bob's Red Mill for KAF because the store by me didn't have any), and it tasted pretty drat good with Sierra Nevada even if it did make a puffy, oyster cracker-style thick crust that was a little on the chewy side. It was pretty hard to toss without tearing, as well, but maybe I didn't knead it for long enough? Also the recipe called for AP flour instead of bread flour.

Does anyone know where I can find instant yeast? It's in tons of different pizza recipes, and I have been to pretty much every style of grocery store in Portland and all I can find is Active Dry.

Easychair Bootson
May 7, 2004

Where's the last guy?
Ultimo hombre.
Last man standing.
Must've been one.


Radio Help posted:

Does anyone know where I can find instant yeast? It's in tons of different pizza recipes, and I have been to pretty much every style of grocery store in Portland and all I can find is Active Dry.
That's pretty surprising that it's not on the shelf right next to the active dry. Instant is also known as quick-rise yeast or bread machine yeast. I think Fleishman's calls theirs "rapid rise."

Deathwing
Aug 16, 2008


Radio Help posted:

Does anyone know where I can find instant yeast? It's in tons of different pizza recipes, and I have been to pretty much every style of grocery store in Portland and all I can find is Active Dry.

I've been using SAF instant yeast from King Arthur's online store - http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop...ant-yeast-16-oz

We ordered 2 of those packages almost a year ago, still working through the first one (stored in a container in the fridge) and it's still rising just fine.

Heaps of Sheeps
Jul 26, 2005



Well I did a thing











Bechamel, Emmental cheese, caramelized onions, finished with fresh thyme. These pies baked at ~850 degrees and cooked in under 2 minutes; natural sourdough starter, King Arthur bread flour. 3 day cold rise.

Aniki
Mar 21, 2001

Wouldn't fit...

What kind of setup are you using to cook a pizza at 850 degrees?

Moey
Oct 22, 2010



Aniki posted:

What kind of setup are you using to cook a pizza at 850 degrees?

If it at home, my guess would be the self clean setting on the oven.

Edit:

Cell phone pic incoming. Also first post of my food on here.

Homemade dough, garlic white sauce, pound of bacon, pound of chicken breast. Layer of toppings below the cheese and on top.

Moey fucked around with this message at Jan 9, 2012 around 00:31

smarion2
Apr 22, 2010


Nostrum posted:

Well I did a thing











Bechamel, Emmental cheese, caramelized onions, finished with fresh thyme. These pies baked at ~850 degrees and cooked in under 2 minutes; natural sourdough starter, King Arthur bread flour. 3 day cold rise.

I am beyond jealous you get to eat that right now.
Also,

Aniki posted:

What kind of setup are you using to cook a pizza at 850 degrees?

angor
Nov 14, 2003
teen angst

Nostrum did a big writeup of his method a little while back: http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...0#post396303468

He uses the self clean cycle on his oven.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


Fontina cheese was a great idea.

lifts cats over head
Jan 17, 2003

Antagonist: A bad man who drops things from the windows.

How do I make the crust on final product softer? I don't have my recipe handy but I remember I used a ratio of 3:1 of flour to liquid and let it rise for about two hours at room temperature, divided the dough and let it rise again for an hour or so. Baked it on a ~550 degree stone.

The end result was crispy and tasted fine, however I'd like to try a softer crust as well.

Any suggestions?

Ghost of Reagan Past
Oct 7, 2003

rock and roll fun


lifts cats over head posted:

How do I make the crust on final product softer? I don't have my recipe handy but I remember I used a ratio of 3:1 of flour to liquid and let it rise for about two hours at room temperature, divided the dough and let it rise again for an hour or so. Baked it on a ~550 degree stone.

The end result was crispy and tasted fine, however I'd like to try a softer crust as well.

Any suggestions?
Is that ratio weight or volume? If it's weight, try a wetter crust. I made a nice soft pizza crust with 75% hydration (by weight) and a two-day cold ferment in the refrigerator; I kneaded it very little, just enough to mix it together properly and work the gluten a little bit. It's too wet to properly knead it, anyway, unless you have a stand mixer. Just cover, place in the fridge, and remove when you want to make the pizza. That's when you can divide the dough and freeze the rest (or whatever you do with it).

I'm not sure if the cold ferment had anything to do with the softness of the crust. Added a lot of tastiness, though. Still, try making a wetter dough.

smarion2
Apr 22, 2010


lifts cats over head posted:

How do I make the crust on final product softer? I don't have my recipe handy but I remember I used a ratio of 3:1 of flour to liquid and let it rise for about two hours at room temperature, divided the dough and let it rise again for an hour or so. Baked it on a ~550 degree stone.

The end result was crispy and tasted fine, however I'd like to try a softer crust as well.

Any suggestions?

After putting all the toppings on the pizza let it rest for like 30 min before putting it in the oven. It should make it softer and more chewy as opposed to crispy.

Rule .303
Dec 9, 2011
(Instructions are just some other guy's opinion)

lifts cats over head posted:

How do I make the crust on final product softer? I don't have my recipe handy but I remember I used a ratio of 3:1 of flour to liquid and let it rise for about two hours at room temperature, divided the dough and let it rise again for an hour or so. Baked it on a ~550 degree stone.

The end result was crispy and tasted fine, however I'd like to try a softer crust as well.

Any suggestions?

How much of a purist are you?
Use a bread-dough recipe, or mix in potato flakes. The potato flakes also reduce the gluten which reduces the spring and toughness if you don't let the dough rest long enough, and you can keep unused dough in the fridge with less drying out.
That's if you cook like I do. If you aim to cook well I may not be the person to give you advice.

Now, for midwest fusion cuisine: has anyone rolled out the pizza dough and put on your sauce, cheese and toppings, and then rolled up and cut it up like cinnamon rolls? I suspect it would either be good or lead to serious injury.

nmfree
Aug 15, 2001

The Greater Goon: Breaking Hearts and Chains since 2006


Phiberoptik posted:

I want to start experimenting with making my own pizza sauce. Anyone got links to good recipes?
I'm sure this will offend pizza purists, but I make Alton's All-purpose Pantry Tomato Sauce, run it through the blender long enough to make it extra smooth, and freeze 2 cup portions in quart-sized Ziplok Bags.

indoflaven
Dec 10, 2009


Phiberoptik posted:

I want to start experimenting with making my own pizza sauce. Anyone got links to good recipes?

Good pizza sauce can be found in a can, concentrate on the other ingredients and you'll have a better pizza.

Darval
Nov 20, 2007

Shiny.

Rule .303 posted:

How much of a purist are you?
Use a bread-dough recipe, or mix in potato flakes. The potato flakes also reduce the gluten which reduces the spring and toughness if you don't let the dough rest long enough, and you can keep unused dough in the fridge with less drying out.
That's if you cook like I do. If you aim to cook well I may not be the person to give you advice.

Now, for midwest fusion cuisine: has anyone rolled out the pizza dough and put on your sauce, cheese and toppings, and then rolled up and cut it up like cinnamon rolls? I suspect it would either be good or lead to serious injury.

Pizza rolls are great, but nothing groundbreakingly new. Not in Denmark anyway. Go easy on the toppings or they'll fall apart. Sprinkle some diced bacon on top of them before baking for extra awesome.

Darval fucked around with this message at Jan 12, 2012 around 05:31

Daedalus Esquire
Mar 30, 2008


You guys mean a Stromboli?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stromboli_(food)

Stromboli is a nice change every once and a while, but I'd rather make a pizza. I tend to buy stromboli from a pizzeria instead of making them.

Keyser_Soze
May 5, 2009



I am a horrible lazy person that just uses Paul Newman's Marinara Sauce and doses it with mexican oregano, roasted garlic sprinkles and fresh ground pepper as my pizza sauce. It tastes great.

Crusty Nutsack
Apr 21, 2005



indoflaven posted:

Good pizza sauce can be found in a can, concentrate on the other ingredients and you'll have a better pizza.

But if you concentrate on making a better pizza sauce, your pizza will be better then too??

My recipe: Plop a 28 oz can of whole peeled roma tomatoes into a bowl or other vessel conducive to immersion blending. If the liquid is thin, just leave it out for now. Add a squirt of honey or a pinch of sugar, a couple minced garlic cloves, some red pepper flakes, lots of dried oregano and a little basil if you want, plus salt. Puree to desired consistency with immersion blender (I like a little texture). If it looks a little weak, add some tomato paste. Or, strain in a mesh sieve. If it's too thick, add some of the liquid that was in the can. Sauces 2 14-inch pizzas generously.

CzarChasm
Mar 14, 2009

Blah Blah Blah
Look at me
I'm the Goddamn Batman
Blah Blah Blah


Crusty Nutsack posted:

But if you concentrate on making a better pizza sauce, your pizza will be better then too??

My recipe: Plop a 28 oz can of whole peeled roma tomatoes into a bowl or other vessel conducive to immersion blending. If the liquid is thin, just leave it out for now. Add a squirt of honey or a pinch of sugar, a couple minced garlic cloves, some red pepper flakes, lots of dried oregano and a little basil if you want, plus salt. Puree to desired consistency with immersion blender (I like a little texture). If it looks a little weak, add some tomato paste. Or, strain in a mesh sieve. If it's too thick, add some of the liquid that was in the can. Sauces 2 14-inch pizzas generously.

My recipe is very similar, but I like it on the chunky side, so I use a can of crushed tomatoes, no blending, but simmered for a while to concentrate into a sauce.

Crusty Nutsack
Apr 21, 2005



CzarChasm posted:

My recipe is very similar, but I like it on the chunky side, so I use a can of crushed tomatoes, no blending, but simmered for a while to concentrate into a sauce.

I prefer an uncooked sauce. But using crushed tomatoes as opposed to whole, and then cooking on top of it, would seem to create the opposite of a chunky sauce? Why not use whole and hand crush for a better texture, especially if you're going to be cooking it which breaks the tomatoes down even more?

indoflaven
Dec 10, 2009


Crusty Nutsack posted:

I prefer an uncooked sauce. But using crushed tomatoes as opposed to whole, and then cooking on top of it, would seem to create the opposite of a chunky sauce? Why not use whole and hand crush for a better texture, especially if you're going to be cooking it which breaks the tomatoes down even more?

It's personal preference. I like a thin, cooked sauce. If I could get better mozz I might prefer fresh chunky.


Also Stromboli is awesome. I make it once every month or so. Great for parties.

indoflaven fucked around with this message at Jan 14, 2012 around 00:29

Cpt. Spring Types
Feb 19, 2004

Wait, what?

I made my first pizza in a while tonight. Garlic crust (I need to use more garlic next time), basil pesto base, gruyere, spinach, mushrooms, sweet italian sausage, chevre. It tastes really great, and the crust is thin and crispy. I don't have a stone, so it's just a pizza pan in a 500 degree oven. It could definitely be better, but I can dig it.


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hyper from Pixie Sticks
Sep 28, 2004



Made my first pizza on a stone today, infinitely better than just using a regular baking sheet like before. I could get used to this home-made malarkey. (Pizza is kale & onion, photography is rubbish)

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