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BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

i've got the big round griddle one and its great, no regrets at all. i hardly use my cast iron any more

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snyprmag
Oct 9, 2005



I have the full size one and primarily use it for pizza and have only used the griddle side on the stove a few times.
If you are doing multiple pizzas, give it a good 5 minutes or so to get back to heat in between. Otherwise the later ones won't have as nice of coloring on the bottom.

Gwaihir
Dec 8, 2009



Hair Elf

legendof posted:

I'm sure this has come up before, but I'm planning on getting a mini baking steel griddle soon (since Kenji loves it, and Kenji is god). Any trip reports of its utility as a pizza stone? Tips?

Baking steel is a good and strong friend.

It does other pizza adjacent things really well too!
Here's some naan:





This was the underside of the very first pizza I made on it after getting it:

legendof
Oct 27, 2014



snyprmag posted:

I have the full size one and primarily use it for pizza and have only used the griddle side on the stove a few times.
If you are doing multiple pizzas, give it a good 5 minutes or so to get back to heat in between. Otherwise the later ones won't have as nice of coloring on the bottom.

Thanks! I am currently planning on (to start) trying the broiler-then-stovetop method, so I will ought to be okay.

Gwaihir
Dec 8, 2009



Hair Elf

Like, putting the pizza in the oven under the broiler on the steel and then?? Putting it in a cast iron skillet on the stovetop?

Once you find the right timing/distance from broiler in your oven you don't need to fuss with moving it around.


(You will have a couple over/under done pies till you find that sweet spot though, I charred the gently caress out of a few for sure).

legendof
Oct 27, 2014



Putting the pizza (on baking steel) under the broiler then moving the baking steel to the stove top to crisp up the bottom crust.

Gwaihir
Dec 8, 2009



Hair Elf

With the baking steel I *seriously* doubt you would ever need or want to move the pizza from the oven to the stovetop. Especially a smaller style like that. It's hard to overstate just how hot/fast the steel cooks when it's been heated in a turned up to max oven for an hour.

The steel just fuckin blasts the bottom of the crust way better than any skillet does.

sirbeefalot
Aug 24, 2004
Fast Learner.

Fun Shoe

The benefit of Kenji's method there seems to just be speed. No waiting for an hour preheat.

But, don't do that with the steel, that just sounds awkward and heavy. I have to grip my (admittedly larger) steel tightly enough that I can't really move it when it's hot, even with multiple oven mitts.

UNCUT PHILISTINE
Jul 27, 2006



The stupidest thing just happened.

I finally decided to pull the trigger on getting a pizza stone, but I had been thinking that there must be some kind of metal alternative because it would make sense as far as heat transfer goes...? So I searched google for a bit, looking for things like "iron pizza stone", "bake pizza iron" and couldn't find anything so I just said "gently caress it" and bought a regular stone.

Almost right after it shipped I stumbled on a serious eats post about pizza steels. Apparently I suck at google and I should have read this thread thoroughly.

Is it going to make a huge difference? I have a gas oven that comfortably goes up to 500.

Gwaihir
Dec 8, 2009



Hair Elf

The steel is loving magic imo.

sirbeefalot
Aug 24, 2004
Fast Learner.

Fun Shoe

UNCUT PHILISTINE posted:

Is it going to make a huge difference? I have a gas oven that comfortably goes up to 500.

Sorry, it makes a colossal difference. Night and day.

Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

Historically, stone tools vs. metal tools was not a huge difference, right?

Mikey Purp
Sep 30, 2008

I realized it's gotten out of control. I realize I'm out of control.

Would a steel make a difference on a screaming hot kamado grill, or is the main advantage heat retention for lower temp oven cooks?

Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

Thermal mass is half of it, heat transfer is the other. With how hot your Kamado can get, a stone might actually be better for anything not a 90 second or less Neapolitan pie.

UNCUT PHILISTINE
Jul 27, 2006



sirbeefalot posted:

Sorry, it makes a colossal difference. Night and day.

gently caress. Well I'm just gonna play with this for a while and get my dad to make a steel in his spare time at the metal shop he works adjacent to.

sirbeefalot
Aug 24, 2004
Fast Learner.

Fun Shoe

UNCUT PHILISTINE posted:

gently caress. Well I'm just gonna play with this for a while and get my dad to make a steel in his spare time at the metal shop he works adjacent to.

This is indeed a super cost effective way of getting one. I took a potato chipped scrap piece of 3/8" plate that wasn't really usable in the shop anymore and flame cut it to fit inside my oven. Just make sure he can descale it and degrease it really well before you cook with it.

FireTora
Oct 6, 2004



Gwaihir posted:

Baking steel is a good and strong friend.

It does other pizza adjacent things really well too!
Here's some naan:





What recipe do you use for your naan?

Gwaihir
Dec 8, 2009



Hair Elf

I think that was just one on seriouseats, https://www.seriouseats.com/2011/08...an-at-home.html

nwin
Feb 25, 2002

make's u think


Fallen Rib

Finally doing some neopolitan pizzas on the blackstone again this weekend. I did a NY style a few weeks ago that turned out great, but here we go again...

What are going to be some good toppings to grab? I realize that's completely subjective, but honestly I just like the standard cheese and sauce with maybe some basil. My sister and her kids that I'm cooking for aren't used to NP pizzas and are definitely more traditional with NY style/American pizza, with the goto pepperoni or mushroom. Any ideas on ingredients to grab for this weekend?

Heaps of Sheeps
Jul 26, 2005



ogopogo posted:

Seconding Pizza Party, great ovens and have held up well over the years. Their price point is drat good too, especially being shipped from Italy.



Which model is that? The 70x70?

ogopogo
Jul 16, 2006
Remember: no matter where you go, there you are.

Heaps of Sheeps posted:

Which model is that? The 70x70?

Yup! Been an amazing oven, and I've been happy as hell with it. But my pop-up pizza business is growing faster than expected so I'm looking into a full dome oven on a trailer so I can start pumping out 50 pizzas an hour if needed :P

ShaneB
Oct 21, 2002



ogopogo posted:

Yup! Been an amazing oven, and I've been happy as hell with it. But my pop-up pizza business is growing faster than expected so I'm looking into a full dome oven on a trailer so I can start pumping out 50 pizzas an hour if needed :P

Whoa.

Mikey Purp
Sep 30, 2008

I realized it's gotten out of control. I realize I'm out of control.

ogopogo posted:

my pop-up pizza business

go on...

ogopogo
Jul 16, 2006
Remember: no matter where you go, there you are.


For a few years while I was learning and developing my pizza with my family's sourdough, I would hold little pop-up parties for close friends in pretty far out spots. What started out as an excuse to get my friends to come out to the middle of the desert to eat my pizza and drink my wine morphed into a small side business that I've been working on growing over the last year or so. Being purely mobile keeps my overheard super low and my risk pretty minimal. Just doing small private events/weddings and farmer's markets type events!

Not trying to shill my own poo poo, but there's a history of the sourdough on my site that explains a little more about it - http://yukonpizza.com/

UNCUT PHILISTINE
Jul 27, 2006



First pizza on the new stone went pretty well. I only heated it up for 45 or so-- as a result the bottom wasn't quite as dark as I'd like. Top was perfect though.

I wanted margherita but my kid insisted on ham and pineapple


Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

UNCUT PHILISTINE posted:

my kid insisted on ham and pineapple


Adoption is always an option.

UNCUT PHILISTINE
Jul 27, 2006



Doom Rooster posted:

Adoption is always an option.

Anyone want a 4 year old pizza ruiner? He also hates cilantro and spicy food. *crickets*

Anyway, can we talk about sauce? For this pizza I made Kenji's 6-hour sauce for the second time. The first time I used cheapo, watery diced tomatoes that I blitzed for a few seconds in a food processor beforehand (some Canadian brand, can't remember now). But the resulting sauce blew my mind, and it looked exactly like Kenji's.

For this pie, I used fancy Muir Glen tomatoes, and the result was completely different, despite following the exact same method. The sauce was a lot thicker, darker, sweeter... The garlic didn't come through as much and almost tasted like I added tomato paste, which I didn't. It was perfect for this kind of pizza but wouldn't be fit for one with lighter toppings. It just didn't have that "bright" quality, if that makes sense? It's almost like the Muir Glen are "too good" and already halfway reduced?

kloa
Feb 14, 2007



Basil adds a nice brightness to heavy sauces. Also red wine vinegar helps cut through it.

Jedit
Dec 10, 2011

Proudly representing vanilla legends 1994-2014


Doom Rooster posted:

Adoption is always an option.

I read that as "abortion" and didn't think any worse of you.

A Neapolitan style pizza joint opened near me recently. I'm not about to try 'nduja because I'm not into spicy, but I have tried their pizza with gorgonzola, walnuts, Parma ham, mozzarella and fig jam and it's great.

sirbeefalot
Aug 24, 2004
Fast Learner.

Fun Shoe

Jedit posted:

I read that as "abortion" and didn't think any worse of you.

A Neapolitan style pizza joint opened near me recently. I'm not about to try 'nduja because I'm not into spicy, but I have tried their pizza with gorgonzola, walnuts, Parma ham, mozzarella and fig jam and it's great.

The one time I've had 'Nduja it was more salty than anything else. Had it on a pie in little dollops with a couple cheeses, leeks and an egg. It was really great.

Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

I fuckin' looooove nduja. It's my latest topping obsession when making pies at home. Salt is definitely a common theme, but I have experienced a wide variety of spice levels. It may be worth trying it out at your new joint, because there is a decent chance theirs will just taste like slightly saltier, funkier pepperoni. It is however also possible that it will melt your face off.

clockworx
Oct 15, 2005
The Internet Whore made me buy this account

As an evangelist of the cheap and convenient electrical clamshell ovens, I wanted to pass along this deal on eBay. If you view my earlier posts in this thread I have summaries of the fun stuff people do with these models of ovens including mods that let them go to Neapolitan troops of 900 degrees plus. Even unmodified, they're probably equal to or better than an oven.

https://m.ebay.com/itm/G3-Ferrari-I...ck/163057616233

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ogopogo
Jul 16, 2006
Remember: no matter where you go, there you are.

Pizza, a story in three parts (with buzzed focus):





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