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smarion2
Apr 22, 2010


Cizzo posted:

I had that problem with standard pizza cutters and then I went the Ice Cream route and would slightly wet my pizza cutter with hot water and the toppings no longer ripped off my pizza.

You know that works with ICE cream is because it's cold, and the HOT scooper melts the ICE cream to make it easier to scoop.

Not too sure what a slightly warm pizza cutter is going to do to a 400 degree pie.

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Cizzo
Jul 5, 2007

Haters gonna hate.


smarion2 posted:

You know that works with ICE cream is because it's cold, and the HOT scooper melts the ICE cream to make it easier to scoop.

Not too sure what a slightly warm pizza cutter is going to do to a 400 degree pie.

Bro I'm just as as you. It just seems to work though.

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


I mean, water is a lubricant. You just lubricated your pizza cutter. It's not that crazy.

smarion2
Apr 22, 2010


Kenning posted:

I mean, water is a lubricant. You just lubricated your pizza cutter. It's not that crazy.

That's what I'm saying. The hot part is just ridiculous.

Cizzo
Jul 5, 2007

Haters gonna hate.


smarion2 posted:

That's what I'm saying. The hot part is just ridiculous.

Haha. I just used hot water on a whim. Didn't really try it with cold water because it worked with the hot water. Point taken though.

theunderwaterbear
Sep 24, 2004


If your pizza cutter is blunt (or you don't have one), use scissors

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


It was warm enough out today to have my windows open, so I ran a self cleaning cycle on my oven. I stuck the pizza stone in there to clean that too. Now all of the grease stains are gone from the stone and it looks brand new.

TheBigBad
Feb 27, 2004

Madness is rare in individuals, but in groups, parties, nations and ages it is the rule.

I've been away from pizza making for quite some time. I think the last few times I tried I had a bitch of a time getting it from the peel to the stone. It would literally be sticky and I had to scrape it off despite using cornmeal and a bunch of flour. So I'm about to jump back in, and I noticed there were people using parchment paper to avoid this, and I was wondering if a silicone cookie sheet be a viable option?

ColHannibal
Sep 17, 2007


TheBigBad posted:

I've been away from pizza making for quite some time. I think the last few times I tried I had a bitch of a time getting it from the peel to the stone. It would literally be sticky and I had to scrape it off despite using cornmeal and a bunch of flour. So I'm about to jump back in, and I noticed there were people using parchment paper to avoid this, and I was wondering if a silicone cookie sheet be a viable option?

Rice Flour is king.

ThirstyBuck
Nov 6, 2010


I've been attempting to refine my pizza skills.I recently added some bricks to the bottom of my oven for better heat. Here is my latest work and my first post. I used the pizza crust recipe from the Joy of Cooking crust (not fantastic) with sausage and mushroom.

ObesePriest
Nov 4, 2008


Hi everyone! I'm gonna attempt this this coming weekend because I've had homemade pizza before and it is delicious and all of these pizzas look so god drat good. Also I want to to build street cred.

I have a few questions if you guys don't mind indulging me and my terribleness.

1. What is the best kind of cheese to use? I hear that reduced fat cheese isn't that good to use because it lacks that stretch that you get when you bite into a pizza. Can i use regular block cheese cut into squares? I also hear fresh mozzarella balls are good?

2. Do you guys pre cook your ingredients? So that you can avoid perfect crust and undercooked ingredients/ burned crust and well-done ingredients. I suppose this question can be linked to the temperature of the oven. It seems like all the ingredients are basically raw.

3. Speaking of which, What temperature do you guys cook your pizzas at? 450-900 seems to be good with higher being better. My oven goes to 550 max which seems sufficient by FogHelmut's delicious looking pizza.

I promise to post pics when its done!

Shooting Blanks
Jun 6, 2007
The Bartender

ObesePriest posted:

Hi everyone! I'm gonna attempt this this coming weekend because I've had homemade pizza before and it is delicious and all of these pizzas look so god drat good. Also I want to to build street cred.

I have a few questions if you guys don't mind indulging me and my terribleness.

1. What is the best kind of cheese to use? I hear that reduced fat cheese isn't that good to use because it lacks that stretch that you get when you bite into a pizza. Can i use regular block cheese cut into squares? I also hear fresh mozzarella balls are good?

2. Do you guys pre cook your ingredients? So that you can avoid perfect crust and undercooked ingredients/ burned crust and well-done ingredients. I suppose this question can be linked to the temperature of the oven. It seems like all the ingredients are basically raw.

3. Speaking of which, What temperature do you guys cook your pizzas at? 450-900 seems to be good with higher being better. My oven goes to 550 max which seems sufficient by FogHelmut's delicious looking pizza.

I promise to post pics when its done!

1. Mozzarella is kind of the classic, and definitely use fresh if you do this. Some people add asiago or parmesan, but these don't melt as well. Fontina does melt well, but it's not very traditional.

2. General sentiment is to not cook your ingredients, with the exception of meats - meats should always go on precooked, precured, or presmoked. Depending on the meat, you may want to wait until the very end of the bake to put it on to retain texture, such as prosciutto. Other exceptions are toppings that are specifically cooked prior, for instance if you want grilled onions instead of fresh.

3. The hotter the better, and use a pizza stone/oven safe stone if at all possible. The hotter your oven gets, the shorter the cooking time, so keep an eye on it.

ObesePriest
Nov 4, 2008


Thanks for the reply! Okay I think i have a good foundation of knowledge for a mediocre pizza! I'm ready! for the weekend!

oRenj9
Aug 3, 2004

Who loves oRenj soda?!?


ObesePriest posted:

2. Do you guys pre cook your ingredients? So that you can avoid perfect crust and undercooked ingredients/ burned crust and well-done ingredients. I suppose this question can be linked to the temperature of the oven. It seems like all the ingredients are basically raw.


If you're using onions, peppers or any vegetation with a lot of moisture in it, I think it is a good idea to lightly roast them before adding them to the pizza. If you put them on top of the cheese raw, the water will cool that part of the cheese and you'll end up with nice toasty cheese with spots of whiteness where the toppings are because the water leaks out of the vegetation and prevents browning. Most people get around this by putting the toppings under the cheese (which is watering down the sauce), but I personally like the maillard flavor that putting veggies on top gives. Plus, roasting makes the veggies them just plain taste better.

quote:

It would literally be sticky and I had to scrape it off despite using cornmeal


Try using more cornmeal. I usually end up using about a tablespoon for a 10" pie before it will reliably slide off the peel (well, poly cutting board). When I have a stuck pizza, what I do is put a pile of cornmeal on the edge of the end of the peel and use a spatula to shove the cornmeal under the prepped pie, almost like your scraping ice off of a frozen car window.

niss
Jul 9, 2008

the amazing gnome

I was having bad problems with my pizza's sticking to my peel. So I tried the suggestion of lifting a corner of the pie and blowing under it. I'll be damned it that poo poo didn't work amazingly well. Used that method on my last 4 pizzas and all slid off perfectly.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


ObesePriest posted:

Hi everyone! I'm gonna attempt this this coming weekend because I've had homemade pizza before and it is delicious and all of these pizzas look so god drat good. Also I want to to build street cred.

I have a few questions if you guys don't mind indulging me and my terribleness.

1. What is the best kind of cheese to use? I hear that reduced fat cheese isn't that good to use because it lacks that stretch that you get when you bite into a pizza. Can i use regular block cheese cut into squares? I also hear fresh mozzarella balls are good?

2. Do you guys pre cook your ingredients? So that you can avoid perfect crust and undercooked ingredients/ burned crust and well-done ingredients. I suppose this question can be linked to the temperature of the oven. It seems like all the ingredients are basically raw.

3. Speaking of which, What temperature do you guys cook your pizzas at? 450-900 seems to be good with higher being better. My oven goes to 550 max which seems sufficient by FogHelmut's delicious looking pizza.

I promise to post pics when its done!


Thanks for the compliment. Fresh mozz is great, but I like a lot of cheese, so I go with part-skim mozzarella since it usually has a lower moisture content. I get puddles in my pizza if I use too much fresh, and while you can do things to take a lot of that moisture out pre-cooking, I am lazy.

CzarChasm
Mar 14, 2009

Blah Blah Blah
Look at me
I'm the Goddamn Batman
Blah Blah Blah


TheBigBad posted:

I've been away from pizza making for quite some time. I think the last few times I tried I had a bitch of a time getting it from the peel to the stone. It would literally be sticky and I had to scrape it off despite using cornmeal and a bunch of flour. So I'm about to jump back in, and I noticed there were people using parchment paper to avoid this, and I was wondering if a silicone cookie sheet be a viable option?

I don't think a silicone sheet would work particularly well. Natuarally, it depends on the size and style, but I think it probably won't brown the way you want it to. Also, silicone mats have a certain temperature threshold that's good for general baking (EDIT: OK. A general sipat goes to 480, but that will depend on manufacturer.), but that might be a little low for pizza making.

ObesePriest
Nov 4, 2008


oRenj9 posted:

Helpful vegetable tips!


Thanks for the vegetable tips! Probably saved me from ruining parts of my pizza.

FogHelmut posted:

Thanks for the compliment. Fresh mozz is great, but I like a lot of cheese, so I go with part-skim mozzarella since it usually has a lower moisture content. I get puddles in my pizza if I use too much fresh, and while you can do things to take a lot of that moisture out pre-cooking, I am lazy

Ahhh thanks! That would have been close I had intended on using all fresh mozz. Time to switch it up or just go light on the fresh mozz and more on other cheeses.

Look for pics on Sunday or Saturday!

ObesePriest
Nov 4, 2008


I DID IT! kind of! First pizza decently successful by my standards at least.

Here is my first crappy dough flat! Don't judge me!



Toppings! Fresh mozz, shredded mozz, Turkey Pepperoni, Chicken apple sausage, and muenster cheese



first pizzar



Done?



Terrible crumb shot Picture quality and crumb quality



Another pizza. Half all cheese and Half all fresh Mozz



Another Pizza



Then I got lazy so we made weird shapes.





I would love additional tips. My crust while tasty seemed to be a bit flat. Any tips on how to remedy this? I let it rise overnight but loosely covered. I let the dough also rest a bit after I had put the toppings on it.

Also any tips on how to get a bit more color on the crust? Should I brush it with butter or something?

Crusty Nutsack
Apr 21, 2005



ObesePriest posted:

Also any tips on how to get a bit more color on the crust? Should I brush it with butter or something?

Cook your pizzas longer. Especially your first one, you don't have any color on your toppings or crust. They're underdone. (You can also use a dough recipe that includes a bit of honey or sugar, but your underdone toppings indicate you should just bake longer first.) Did you roll your dough with a rolling pin? That will contribute to your rising issues. Just stretch your dough into shape.

ObesePriest
Nov 4, 2008


Ah I did roll my dough with a pin! It makes sense that would make it rather flat. I shall use my hands next time. I was using my hands but I think my technique is super terrible so I shall do better next time!

I had planned on cooking it longer but I had some burn marks on the buttom of my crust and I was afraid that if I had left it on much longer I would get a burned crust. I shall try my oven next time! I don't think the kettle gives me a consistent burn as well as I would like.

Oh well even mistakes are tasty!

Edit: Also thanks for the advice!

ObesePriest fucked around with this message at Mar 17, 2012 around 22:26

torkel
Feb 22, 2012

mub da mo bidda te dat tum muhfugen bix nood cof bin dub ho muhfugga


So I got my new place a while back and I'm finally adjusting to the horror of having a lovely oven. It being the weekend and all, I made pizza.
Just an excuse though, I eat pizza in the weekdays too

Anyway here are some pics.

Here's what I made today for lunch, dough had risen overnight, so maybe 15 hours? Taste was great, like a really good ciabatta or something like that.
And yeah my camera sucks.

Salami, some basil & oregano.


Two crumbshots, got a pretty nice rise where I wanted it - I mostly need to work on my tossing technique as you can see



Crust turned out as good as I can expect really, me not having a stone and all.



Here's what I made yesterday (did I mention I like pizza?):

Same dough, though just a couple of hours of regular rise. Taste wasn't nearly as good. Although I did a lot better with the tossing..



Better shots too, my camera works in mysterious ways

TheBigBad
Feb 27, 2004

Madness is rare in individuals, but in groups, parties, nations and ages it is the rule.

Is it possible to start a culture with a bit of raw dough from your favorite pizzeria, or has the salt in the dough killed the lactobacilli that poops out the flavor?

smarion2
Apr 22, 2010


TheBigBad posted:

Is it possible to start a culture with a bit of raw dough from your favorite pizzeria, or has the salt in the dough killed the lactobacilli that poops out the flavor?

Are you asking if you could get the yeast out of the dough? I'm sure you could ask the pizza place what yeast they use for their dough. I hope you know that you can not multiply dough cells.

TheBigBad
Feb 27, 2004

Madness is rare in individuals, but in groups, parties, nations and ages it is the rule.

smarion2 posted:

Are you asking if you could get the yeast out of the dough? I'm sure you could ask the pizza place what yeast they use for their dough. I hope you know that you can not multiply dough cells.

LOL. Yeah... grow the yeast culture from a piece of raw dough.

Many of the best pizzerias will either lie, or guard their culture. Occasionally you can talk one of the kids that work there into selling you an uncooked pizza.

Wahad
May 19, 2011



Everything by design.


Hed posted:

Made a few 10" pies this weekend. This was my first time making Pizza:

Mozzarella, Prosciutto, and Dates:

The dates and prosciutto together were a really really nice flavor. I will definitely be making this again, larger.

Finally got around to making this myself and oh my god, so good. No picture, though, because I was so hungry.

smarion2
Apr 22, 2010


That does sound like a tasty pie. I had one the other night that was just too good.

Chicken
Bacon
Artichoke
Some crazy good Blu Cheese crumble/sauce stuff

I suggest you guys try that combination if you haven't before it might be my new favorite right now.

Mad_Lion
Jul 14, 2005



I've been making my own pizzas at home for a while now, but using pre-made crusts (don't judge!). Making my own crust is definitely next on the agenda, but first I'd like a critique of my sauce, and then advice on dough.

I made a couple today, and they were delicious. I think with a real crust, they would have been better than pizzaria quality. Here's a picture of the leftover one (we ate the other too fast for a pic!) Also, it's in a pizza box that I saved from a take out. This one was better than the take out!



Here's the sauce that I make:

One of those small cans tomato paste, and the same can filled with filtered water.
3-4 garlic cloves
1 tsp. dried oregano
1/4 tsp. dried basil
1 tsp. sugar
half a tbsp. olive oil
1/2 tsp or a little more salt
a good amount of cracked black pepper (maybe a quarter tsp.? this I don't measure)

I mix the water with the paste until it's combined, throw the garlic cloves in the food processor, dump in the tomato puree, and everything else, and pulse until blended well.

-----

This sauce is pretty delicious, IMO.

For the pizzas I just made, I used the premade crust, spread the sauce out (it makes enough for two 12" pizzas), layer provolone slices, thinly sliced zucchini, red bell pepper, red onion, and mushrooms, and then covered it all with some grated parmesan. After baking on high heat for 10 minutes, I took them out and then sprinkled a little bit of "italian seasoning blend" on top.

They were amazing, but the crust was not so great (store bought)

-----------------------

What's the easiest way to make dough? Also, any thing I could tweak about the sauce?

Mad_Lion fucked around with this message at Mar 25, 2012 around 10:05

Macaluso
Sep 23, 2005

I HATE THAT HEDGEHOG, BROTHER!


torkel posted:



Better shots too, my camera works in mysterious ways

I don't know much about this fancy cooking stuff, but that pizza looks loving delicious, especially the pepperoni.

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004





to the guy having trouble with pizza sticking to the peel while assembling : use lots of semolina flour. I guess cornmeal would work too, but semolina is a bit coarser which helps it slide. also just get your mise en place done so you can crank out the pizza in ~1-2 minutes - the longer it sits on the peel, the greater the chance of it sticking.

to the guy asking about precooking vegetables - don't precook. if you are worried about the watery thing, just slice your vegetables thinner. I usually do my onions paper thin. a oven cranked to max will cook thin veggies no problem.

Wolfy
Jul 13, 2009


I've been messing around with making pizzas lately. My friend linked me to something called Kettlepizza and I was just wondering if this was a worthwhile investment.

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


Wolfy posted:

I've been messing around with making pizzas lately. My friend linked me to something called Kettlepizza and I was just wondering if this was a worthwhile investment.

Price seems a bit steep for a piece of sheet metal with a hole cut out of it.

dedian
Sep 2, 2011


I guess not having to open the top would be handy, and keep the temp more stable, as well as being able to easily slide pizzas on a peel in from the side.

The way I do pizzas on the grill (actually did this Sunday!) is to make "single serving" sized crusts (around 6-8" I think) and cook one side on the grill until it's browned as much as you'd like. Take it out, flip it over and top it with what you'd like (so you're putting toppings on the cooked side of the crust) - then just put it back on the grill to cook the other side of the crust. Usually by that time the toppings/cheese are plenty cooked. Having a two-heat-zone coal setup would probably be useful if you need more time to cook the toppings and less so the crust.

I experimented this past weekend with lump charcoal (I've been using briquettes until now). The lump is really tasty, and very hot, but doesn't seem to last as long as I would want for more than a few pizzas, even when the vents are closed down quite a bit. Not to mention most of the chunks just fall through the charcoal grate..

Spoon Man
Mar 15, 2003



dedian posted:

The way I do pizzas on the grill (actually did this Sunday!) is to make "single serving" sized crusts (around 6-8" I think) and cook one side on the grill until it's browned as much as you'd like. Take it out, flip it over and top it with what you'd like (so you're putting toppings on the cooked side of the crust) - then just put it back on the grill to cook the other side of the crust. Usually by that time the toppings/cheese are plenty cooked. Having a two-heat-zone coal setup would probably be useful if you need more time to cook the toppings and less so the crust.

I do something similar on a gas grill. I have a side burner, so I sauté the toppings in a skillet before putting them on because they're raw otherwise. Without the side burner, you can always precook all toppings indoors and they should at least be warmed enough by the short time on the grill.

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004





Wolfy posted:

I've been messing around with making pizzas lately. My friend linked me to something called Kettlepizza and I was just wondering if this was a worthwhile investment.

lol no. just use your oven on cleaning cycle if you really are that insane about heat. or just crank it if you aren't.

cowofwar
Jul 30, 2002



smarion2 posted:

That's what I'm saying. The hot part is just ridiculous.
Not really, water acts as a lubricant and hot water has lower viscosity.

TheBigBad
Feb 27, 2004

Madness is rare in individuals, but in groups, parties, nations and ages it is the rule.

Wolfy posted:

I've been messing around with making pizzas lately. My friend linked me to something called Kettlepizza and I was just wondering if this was a worthwhile investment.

I saw a ceramic version of this at Ace Hardware last year. They were really nice and I thought it would be perfect except for the price tags.


edit: Big Green Eggs http://rockymountainstove.com/big_green_egg.aspx

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

I love making pizza on my big green egg! 1000+ degrees cooks them in no time at all

niss
Jul 9, 2008

the amazing gnome

BraveUlysses posted:

I love making pizza on my big green egg! 1000+ degrees cooks them in no time at all

Yes it does, it also destroys the gasket that much quicker, and scraping the old one is a bitch

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BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

niss posted:

Yes it does, it also destroys the gasket that much quicker, and scraping the old one is a bitch

Troof...mine needs to be replaced. I'm planning on trying a nomex one this time, have you used one?

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