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niss
Jul 9, 2008

the amazing gnome

BraveUlysses posted:

Troof...mine needs to be replaced. I'm planning on trying a nomex one this time, have you used one?


http://www.amazon.com/Nomex-Gasket-...33135177&sr=8-1

This is the one I used, installation was really easy, but like I said getting the old one off was a bitch. Just make sure to take everything apart. I used a towel and placed the top lid inside the bottom so I could easily put the gasket on the top lid.

Also, make sure to crank the bands back really really tight. I had a bit of a scare after a few high temp cooks, and almost lost the top mid cook.

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herculesrockefeller
Jun 9, 2006


I've been using my pizza stone weekly since picking it up 6 months ago. It's black and broken, but solders on regardless.

I've got an experimental calzone in the oven right now, hope it turns out alright!

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.





This was on a whim, so Trader Joe's dough. Layer of pesto for sauce. Mozzerella. Then shrimp that I par cooked in garlic and butter. Baked 10 minutes on the stone at 550. Arugula on top, back in the oven for a minute or two until it wilted.

duffmensch
Feb 20, 2004

Duffman is thrusting in the direction of the problem!

Can anyone in Phoenix recommend where I can get some quarry paving stone to use for cooking? So far I haven't had any luck with Home Depot, Lowes or Floor & Decor Oulets in Tempe. I'm not sure if I'm just wording it wrong when I ask for it or if I am expecting what they do have to be closer to my Bed Bath and Beyond stone.

Shooting Blanks
Jun 6, 2007

Real bullets mess up how cool this thing looks.

-Blade


You're not alone - I struck out cold in Houston, wound up ordering a baking stone online after trying a dozen different places.

strangehamster
Sep 20, 2010

dance the night away

I made this pizza last night, it's composed of bell peppers, portobello mushrooms, and Italian sausage. I used Peter Reinhart's napoletana pizza dough recipe.



It turned out great, I can't believe I forgot an under-crust picture.

niss
Jul 9, 2008

the amazing gnome

That pizza looks amazing, and tasty.

Hed
Mar 31, 2004



Fun Shoe

Well Flash Gordon Ramsey, you are a genius. After my stand mixer tumbled to the floor from an earlier attempt at making pizza dough he suggested bringing it together in the food processor.

I used America's Test Kitchen's recipe for the food processor and not only did it come together super easy, my mixer isn't suicidal. Results were delicious:

I made it square(ish) because when I started rolling it out that's how it seemed to want to go. Sorry no crust shot because my friends and I were starving.

Also I found that the recommended procedure in that ATK recipe of poaching the meats for a few minutes in water really helped parcook as well as draw some fat away without drying them out. I will be doing that again in the future.

Olympic Mathlete
Feb 25, 2011



Has anyone found any decent plans for a wood-fired oven? I'm doing my garden over spring/summer and would like to get an oven built somewhere in there because gently caress, I love pizza.

I've been using a mild variation on Varasano's method, basically the only thing I measure is the water and that's done me fine for a good 12 months or so, leaving it to ferment in the fridge makes it so so good. Are there any other particularly good ways to do a base which tastes like that?

Edit: now with pics!

Bog standard mozzarella using the hour rise style dough.



The now pizza party standard reggae reggae sauce pizza (we did this wayyyy before Dominos ever did). It's been agreed it's so tasty that it now become the de rigeur sauce.



And this was one from last week, same as above. Slow rise over 4/5 days this one.


Olympic Mathlete fucked around with this message at Apr 12, 2012 around 16:50

forbidden dialectics
Jul 26, 2005



88h88 posted:

I've been using a mild variation on Varasano's method, basically the only thing I measure is the water and that's done me fine for a good 12 months or so, leaving it to ferment in the fridge makes it so so good. Are there any other particularly good ways to do a base which tastes like that?

Make the jump to a sourdough culture. I got the "Italian" one from http://www.sourdo.com. The difference in flavor is very significant. Additionally, the slightly acidic dough is much stronger and easier to spread. I usually rise for 4-5 days in the fridge, and depending on how much it rises (I mark the plastic containers with dry erase markers to judge), I'll give it anywhere from an hour to 4 hours out of the fridge to get a bit more lift.

TheBigBad
Feb 27, 2004

Madness is rare in individuals, but in groups, parties, nations and ages it is the rule.

Nostrum posted:

Make the jump to a sourdough culture. I got the "Italian" one from http://www.sourdo.com. The difference in flavor is very significant. Additionally, the slightly acidic dough is much stronger and easier to spread. I usually rise for 4-5 days in the fridge, and depending on how much it rises (I mark the plastic containers with dry erase markers to judge), I'll give it anywhere from an hour to 4 hours out of the fridge to get a bit more lift.

I've kept my culture around for about 7 years now.

Daedalus Esquire
Mar 30, 2008


88h88 posted:

Has anyone found any decent plans for a wood-fired oven? I'm doing my garden over spring/summer and would like to get an oven built somewhere in there because gently caress, I love pizza.


http://www.fornobravo.com/ has plans to build some pretty hardcore pizza ovens.

If you have archives, here is a link to a thread I did on building a quick and dirty pizza oven for about $200. http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...0#post393312380

If you don't have archives, here is the web page I stumbled over that I based my oven off of. http://people.umass.edu/dac/project...t_BrickOven.htm

smarion2
Apr 22, 2010


88h88 posted:

And this was one from last week, same as above. Slow rise over 4/5 days this one.

Mmmm this one looks so tasty. What is reggae reggae sauce pizza?

Cpt. Spring Types
Feb 19, 2004

Wait, what?

smarion2 posted:

Mmmm this one looks so tasty. What is reggae reggae sauce pizza?

I think it's a pizza with this stuff on it. Sounds pretty good to me.

Cpt. Spring Types fucked around with this message at Apr 12, 2012 around 23:50

Tongsy
Aug 22, 2007


Last night...

Chorizo, mozzarella, and mushrooms. Home made dough brushed with chili oil


Pesto, caramelized onion, garlic, parmesan, feta. Home made dough rubbed with garlic.

Sacrilage
Feb 11, 2012

It will burn the eyes.

So, its actually really easy to make your pizzas round without those thin and thick spots that the OP had in his pizza; was something I learned at dominoes (please forgive the heresy, but true). I found a good video of how to do it; watch from minute 4 onward, where he shoes you how to properly "ball" the dough before letting it rest/expand, especially minute 6.

This also lets you make bigger pizzas without soft centers or uncooked crusts. Great technique.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ju3M...feature=related

Sacrilage fucked around with this message at Apr 13, 2012 around 18:31

Olympic Mathlete
Feb 25, 2011



Cpt. Spring Types posted:

I think it's a pizza with this stuff on it. Sounds pretty good to me.

That's the exact stuff, it is wonderful. I used to make your standard tomato base sauce which was good until one night my housemate asked if we had any dips. I pulled out that stuff and when she tried it she said it was delicious. After trying it for myself I confirmed it was indeed super tasty. At this point we made a half and half pizza sauce/reggae sauce but the tomato just got overpowered so we went reggae alone with great results.

Another thing that's drat good is Chinese sweet chilli sauce instead of tomato/reggae. Chuck a bit of cheese over it and enjoy.

Also thanks for the links, I'll have a good read very soon.

angor
Nov 14, 2003
teen angst

duffmensch posted:

Can anyone in Phoenix recommend where I can get some quarry paving stone to use for cooking? So far I haven't had any luck with Home Depot, Lowes or Floor & Decor Oulets in Tempe. I'm not sure if I'm just wording it wrong when I ask for it or if I am expecting what they do have to be closer to my Bed Bath and Beyond stone.

When I lived in Phoenix I went to Home Depot and got unglazed tiles. I think they were meant for roofing maybe? They're in 6"x6" squares. I bought 12 and double stacked them. Worked a charm!

FogHelmut
Dec 18, 2003

Your authority is not recognized in Fort Kickass.


Sacrilage posted:

So, its actually really easy to make your pizzas round without those thin and thick spots that the OP had in his pizza; was something I learned at dominoes (please forgive the heresy, but true). I found a good video of how to do it; watch from minute 4 onward, where he shoes you how to properly "ball" the dough before letting it rest/expand, especially minute 6.

This also lets you make bigger pizzas without soft centers or uncooked crusts. Great technique.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ju3M...feature=related



I'm trying to figure out how many eggs per 1 home size batch of dough in that recipe from that video. 6 eggs in 50 lbs of flour. You use a 1/2 lb of flour for 1 pizza? Roughly? There's 100 half lbs in 50 lbs, so that's 0.06 eggs in a home made pizza. Or 1 egg per 8.3 lbs of flour if you're having trouble figuring out how much 0.06 eggs is. I don't know where you are going to store all of that dough to use 1 egg.

Olympic Mathlete
Feb 25, 2011



How would eggs affect a dough being cold risen in the fridge? I mean is there a point where I'd get sick eating pizza due to the age of the egg? School me, I honestly have no clue about it.

Queen Elizatits
May 3, 2005

Haven't you heard?
MARATHONS ARE HARD

Made this today. Sweet potatoes are good on a pizza!

Happy Abobo
Jun 21, 2007

Looks tastier, anyway.

Just tried my hand at this again, and got decidedly better results with a definitely stupider method.



I built the pizza on a square of parchment paper on a cutting board, then preheated the oven to 500 with a cheap aluminum pizza tray inside. Once it was screaming hot, I side the pizza onto the tray, baked it until the crust puffed up, then turned the broiler on high and moved the pizza to the upper rack. Let it sit there until the crust browned nicely while I turned a burner on high.

Then I put the whole tray on the burner for a minute to crisp the bottom up. It sounds dumb, but it worked like a charm. I got a super-thin crust that stay nicely crispy through the entire meal.

thebigpicture
Nov 14, 2007


I made a pizza too! (click for huge)



Used premade dough from the market though. Late night snack.
Over easy egg, fresh jalapeno, basil, mozzarella, sauce was just crushed tomatoes, olive oil, and a tiny bit of oregano. Drizzled some olive oil on top when it came out. I cooked it on the cast iron pan but I didn't let it heat up in the oven long enough so the cheese started to brown before the crust really set up, ended up putting it on the stove top for a minute or two to crisp up the bottom.

ColHannibal
Sep 17, 2007


88h88 posted:

How would eggs affect a dough being cold risen in the fridge? I mean is there a point where I'd get sick eating pizza due to the age of the egg? School me, I honestly have no clue about it.

Ide assume the bio burden from the eggs could cause some nasty bugs to move in and kill your healthy good yeast.

Spoon Man
Mar 15, 2003



Now that the Flyers lost their last series, it's time for me to post some pictures from my traditional playoff pizza parties.

All pizzas made in 550F gas ovens. The crust was prebaked on a pan for a few minutes until it could hold its shape, topped, then slid directly onto the oven rack (as you can see by the lines).

Honey whole wheat dough with onions, peppers, and hot sausage.



Button mushrooms and onions sauted in sausage fat.


We were running out of dough, so I experimented with the thinnest crust I could make. This was the best pie of the night.




Here are a selection of the different pies from the most recent game. Left is the homemade honey whole wheat dough, top is Trader Joe's whole wheat dough, and bottom is Trader Joe's basil dough. The homemade dough was significantly more tasty.



If the thumbnails don't work, click for huge.

Doh004
Apr 22, 2007

Mmmmm Donuts...

Wanna eat those pizzas.

Crashbee
May 15, 2007

Stupid people are great at winning arguments, because they're too stupid to realize they've lost.

Yesterday's dinner: spelt sourdough base with sweetcorn and jalapenos. Stuffed crust as an experiment!

NosmoKing
Nov 12, 2004

I have a rifle and a frying pan and I know how to use them

It's not really pizza, but this seems like a good place to ask.

Anyone have good recipes for cracker crust/non-yeast leavened very thin crusts.

I remember that Thomas Keller cracker flatbread/crust from ad hoc but I'm wondering if there are other options or takes on this subject.

Hed
Mar 31, 2004



Fun Shoe

Here's the crust from the St. Louis style pizza recipe I use. I adapted it from a St. Louis Post Dispatch repost of a Cook's Country recipe developed by Meghan Erwin (a St. Louis native). Remember that in St. Louis style the crust is just a platform for sauce, toppings, and CHEESE that burns your mouth

  • 160g all-purpose flour (1c)
  • 8g cornstarch (2T)
  • 4g granulated sugar (1t)
  • 2g baking powder (1t)
  • 3g salt (1t)
  • 74g water (1/2 c + 2 T)
  • 13g olive oil (1/2 T), plus more for pan

...snip...
4. Prepare the dough. Combine dry ingredients in a large bowl. Combine water and olive oil in a measuring cup. Stir water mixture into flour mixture until dough starts to come together. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface and knead 3 or 4 times, until cohesive.
5. Using a rolling pin, roll dough into a 14-inch circle, place into lightly-oiled cutter pan.
6. Dock the dough and blind bake the crust for 4-5 minutes.
7. Retrieve crust from oven. Top dough with sauce and some of the cheese. Bake until underside of crust is golden brown and cheese is completely melted, 10 to 14 minutes.
...snip...

This recipe calls for baking on parchment laid on a preheated inverted sheet pan or pizza stone. I bake it in a 14" cutter pan

This is what it yields:

niss
Jul 9, 2008

the amazing gnome

Cooked some pizzas for dinner tonight. Feel like I am getting better at it, these were my best crusts to date, thin and crispy. Put a bit of whole wheat flour in the mix.







niss fucked around with this message at May 13, 2012 around 14:02

Easychair Bootson
May 7, 2004

Where's the last guy?
Ultimo hombre.
Last man standing.
Must've been one.


niss posted:

Cooked some pizzas for dinner tonight.
them's some beautiful pizzas.

Phoenix Knives
May 7, 2012


All of those pizzas look good and yummy!

Rocko Bonaparte
Mar 12, 2002

Every day is Friday!


All this pizza makes me wish my pizza oven was in commission. Some of my cob came off in the last bit of rain, so I have a fresh wad of cob pressed up into the gap using a car jack. It'll have to cure ove time. It looks like my oven isn't ever going to be quite water proof, but otherwise it works nicely.

I see some discussion in the last page about pizza ovens and such. Are there still any questions?

I was wondering if there was an opinion on Italian type 00 flour. I'm suspecting that it hydrates quicker, and the wood-fired ovens generally need a wetter dough, so that's why it gets all the attention. Since I started making bigas I haven't seen as much of a difference.

For anybody on the fence on an outdoor oven: overnight you can slow cook barbecue meats with the oven door shut. They cook just fine, without any attention at all, just from the residual heat.

Darval
Nov 20, 2007

Shiny.

Made some slow-rise pizza last night, with Alton Brown's recipe. Was eaten before the camera reached the table.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ejC41lJfSs

It was way too salt though, should have checked comments on the website

Stalizard
Aug 11, 2006

Have I got a headache!

Fun Shoe

Every time I make a pizza the crust turns out less chewy and more like a cracker. I've tried both the Reinhart pizza dough where you leave it in the fridge for a couple days and Emeril's food processor pizza dough, I leave the oven to preheat to 500 and bake it on a stone until the crust gets some color and the cheese is bubbly.

It seems like the logical answer is that I'm leaving it in the oven too long, but my first five or so pizzas suffered from being extremely undercooked so I don't think cooking it for less time will help if my oven is as hot as it can get. Also, I used to live right next to the world's best Neapolitan pizza place and their ovens are like 900 degrees, that reinforces my belief that the problem is in my dough rather than my oven.

Do you have any idea what I'm doing wrong? I just want a crust that is a little chewy on the inside and crisp on the outside, this can't be that hard. I have made like ten pizzas and the crust is the only thing I haven't been able to get right.

thebigpicture
Nov 14, 2007


I have the same problem occasionally.

Are you stretching it too thin? You might also want to try stretching the dough out to size and then letting it sit for about 5 minutes before you add your sauce/toppings and put it in the oven. This might help it get a little more chewy. Alton Brown talks about this in the video that Darval posted above.

Xarb
Nov 26, 2000

Not happy.

I finally got a pizza stone and it fixed all the issues I was having with my pizza base.

The difference it makes is crazy.

angor
Nov 14, 2003
teen angst

Finally! Pizzas that I'm happy to show off to strangers on the internet . I used Alton Brown's dough recipe from Flat is Beautiful but I used 'Tipo 00' flour. Kneaded by hand (30 min). This dough ended up spending about 75 hours in the fridge, then bench proofed for 30min-1hr (it takes time to make and eat pizza ). Hand shaped using this guy's method: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjYqw1CLZsA

On to the pics. Click for massive.

First one was done without sauce. Olive oil, garlic and herbs, topped with mozzarella, chillies, onions and peppers.


Money shot.


Next one was a Thai pizza. Peanut sauce, mozzarella, onions and chillies. Cooked, then topped with a salad of bean sprouts, coriander (cilantro), carrots, soy sauce and toasted sesame oil. loving excellent.


Closeup.


Crumb shot.


Then we tried a dessert pizza. This.....needs some work. We spread Nutella on the base then baked it. It burned a little. Topped with strawberries then whipped cream.


Now, I have a question. I've been using Tipo 00 and cooking at ~500f on a pizza stone. I've heard that Tipo 00 really shines when it comes to ovens that get hot as gently caress, but isn't great for home setups. Would moving to a bread flour yield better results? If I'm using Alton Brown's recipe, should I be tweaking anything (water, etc.) when using Tipo 00?

forbidden dialectics
Jul 26, 2005



angor posted:

Now, I have a question. I've been using Tipo 00 and cooking at ~500f on a pizza stone. I've heard that Tipo 00 really shines when it comes to ovens that get hot as gently caress, but isn't great for home setups. Would moving to a bread flour yield better results? If I'm using Alton Brown's recipe, should I be tweaking anything (water, etc.) when using Tipo 00?

Depends on your definition of "better"! 00 flour is very low gluten - around what US sells as "cake flour", around 9%. It's also milled much finer than standard AP or Bread flour (or even cake flour!). 00 flour has some very advantageous qualities when you're baking at >700 degrees. First, it absorbs significantly less water by weight than a coarser milled flour. This gives awesome oven spring with big, soft bubbles. Second, since the dough has less gluten and more water, it takes longer to brown (and burn) allowing your watery toppings (crushed tomatoes) to cook before the crust starts to burn.

This produces a very specific style of pizza - what you'd find in and around Naples. The crust is very light, airy, soft, and since it doesn't have much hard, gluteny structure to keep it from flopping around, you might want to use a fork and knife. It's specifically tailored to an extremely dry bake in a wood-fired, 800++ degree oven.

In general, I would not recommend using it unless you are baking at 800+ degrees. It will never brown, you won't get much spring, it might even be soggy. If you want foldable, NY-style slices, you will have MUCH better luck with Hi-Gluten Bread flours. It will brown nicely in a 500 degree oven and give you a a very stable, chewy crust.

I currently use a mix of 00 and plain old bread flour, but I'm baking at ~825ish degrees. The flour/water absorbtion is huge if you're in that ballpark.

forbidden dialectics fucked around with this message at May 31, 2012 around 21:46

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angor
Nov 14, 2003
teen angst

This is fantastic advice, thank you. I am planning on getting up to the 800+ wood fired mark a little bit later, so I now know what to expect.

I've made 2 batches of dough this time, one with tipo 00 and one with a high gluten bread flour. Both made, kneaded and refrigerated under the exact same conditions and ingredients. It'll be fun when I can see the difference side by side! Stay tuned for pictures on Monday .

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