Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us money per month for bills, and since we don't believe in showing ads to our users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
 
  • Post
  • Reply
Rocko Bonaparte
Mar 12, 2002

Every day is Friday!


StarkingBarfish posted:

I find this too- it's personal preference but after eating a pie with 3% salt I find myself getting up to drink water in the middle of the night. For my recipe about 2.5% is enough to not mess much with the fermentation and still give the dough a good flavour. Any less and it begins to get a bit bland.

Just to be thorough here: what kind of sauce and cheese are you using?

I was previous reluctant to start getting into salt because I was at one point using store sauce that was salty and had some parmesan in my cheese mix. That was starting to wear people out. I've tuned that back.

I suppose a logical thing to do is to go from 1% to 2% and see how things change. That won't likely be for, like, a week and a half though.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

StarkingBarfish
Jun 25, 2006

Novus Ordo Seclorum


I'm using a can of san marzanos, 4-6 leaves of basil and ~1-2g of salt hit for about 2 seconds with a stick blender to coat about 6-8 pizzas. The salt amount in the sauce is usually the thing I adjust to taste as different brands/varieties of tomatoes have a different salt content and sweetness but it doesn't contribute much to the total. On my neapolitans I'm typically adding 1tbsp of grana, pecorino or parmesan and for pecorino in particular that's another 1/4-1/2g of salt added to each pie.

The issue I have with dropping the salt in the dough to account for the toppings is that the crust is 50% of the pizza experience for me- if the cornicione doesn't have some flavour to it I feel like I'm missing out on one of the best parts of a good neapolitan.

StarkingBarfish fucked around with this message at 08:51 on Apr 6, 2021

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


90 minutes is a long preheat. personally i try and give it no more than 60, which is probably too much but i often just sit a probe inside and weight for the temperature to equilibrate.

my go to is to have the steel on the very top of the oven. then a little before pizza goes in i’ll switch on the broiler. things cook...very fast...at that point.

Fart Car '97
Jul 23, 2003

o fuk traffic

mediaphage posted:

90 minutes is a long preheat. personally i try and give it no more than 60, which is probably too much but i often just sit a probe inside and weight for the temperature to equilibrate.

my go to is to have the steel on the very top of the oven. then a little before pizza goes in i’ll switch on the broiler. things cook...very fast...at that point.

90 minutes pre-heat & 15 minutes broiler on is about what it takes to get my stone to a point where it makes a really good pizza, so I don't think it's long at all?

Like, it's noticably better than a 60 minute preheat.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


Fart Car '97 posted:

90 minutes pre-heat & 15 minutes broiler on is about what it takes to get my stone to a point where it makes a really good pizza, so I don't think it's long at all?

Like, it's noticably better than a 60 minute preheat.

no, it's an objectively long preheat. i'm not trying to tell you not to do it, maybe it's what your oven needs because it doesn't dump as much heat as quickly into the cabinet.

Rocko Bonaparte
Mar 12, 2002

Every day is Friday!


StarkingBarfish posted:

I'm using a can of san marzanos, 4-6 leaves of basil and ~1-2g of salt hit for about 2 seconds with a stick blender to coat about 6-8 pizzas. The salt amount in the sauce is usually the thing I adjust to taste as different brands/varieties of tomatoes have a different salt content and sweetness but it doesn't contribute much to the total. On my neapolitans I'm typically adding 1tbsp of grana, pecorino or parmesan and for pecorino in particular that's another 1/4-1/2g of salt added to each pie.

The issue I have with dropping the salt in the dough to account for the toppings is that the crust is 50% of the pizza experience for me- if the cornicione doesn't have some flavour to it I feel like I'm missing out on one of the best parts of a good neapolitan.

Ahh okay, I can understand adjusting the sauce's salt based on the starting amount of salt. I'm assuming that's something like a 28oz can of san marzanos. For whatever reason, that seems like quite a bit of basil, but I'm really just worried about the salt.

My old cheese mix was something like 50% park-skim mozzarella, 25% provolone, and 25% parmesan. So I wouldn't measure out exactly how much parmesan I'm using per pizza, but it would definitely be more than a tablespoon. Now I do 50/50 mozzarella/provolone (young). It still tastes pretty good without being so salty.

I guess I can try 2% next time and just see what happens. The reason I'm fussing so much is that it'll be even longer if I should have used more, and more salt will affect the yeast enough that I'm going to be handling strange dough each time I screw with that salt.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


six leaves of basil doesn’t sound like a ton to me but basil is extremely variable in leaf sizing

sirbeefalot
Aug 24, 2004
Fast Learner.

Fun Shoe

We got a new grill and I want to try putting my old stone in it for pizza. Any precautions to avoid breaking the stone?

Grill is just a little Weber Q 2200. The grates are solid directly over the burners, so the stone shouldn't be getting direct flame, but it does heat up way faster than the oven.

PokeJoe
Aug 24, 2004

hail cgatan




i do 45-60min preheats. i point an IR thermometer at my stone and just start when it's ~525F since it's as hot as my oven goes. with the broiler on first I've gotten the stone to 550 but that's more luck with timing the oven and broiler cycles, it won't stabilize at that temp.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


sirbeefalot posted:

We got a new grill and I want to try putting my old stone in it for pizza. Any precautions to avoid breaking the stone?

Grill is just a little Weber Q 2200. The grates are solid directly over the burners, so the stone shouldn't be getting direct flame, but it does heat up way faster than the oven.

i don't think so, i've never had a problem with my stone on the grill, where it was relegated once the steel was introduced

Fart Car '97
Jul 23, 2003

o fuk traffic

mediaphage posted:

no, it's an objectively long preheat.

mediaphage posted:

maybe it's what your oven needs because it doesn't dump as much heat as quickly into the cabinet.

What difference does it make if you think it's 'objectively long' if that's what it takes to get a good cook for me or that other guy? I don't really care why it takes that long, or that it takes longer for my cheap rear end oven to get there than nicer ones, that's just what it takes.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


all i said was that it was a long preheat

there’s no need to get upset about it

StarkingBarfish
Jun 25, 2006

Novus Ordo Seclorum


Rocko Bonaparte posted:

Ahh okay, I can understand adjusting the sauce's salt based on the starting amount of salt. I'm assuming that's something like a 28oz can of san marzanos. For whatever reason, that seems like quite a bit of basil, but I'm really just worried about the salt.

My old cheese mix was something like 50% park-skim mozzarella, 25% provolone, and 25% parmesan. So I wouldn't measure out exactly how much parmesan I'm using per pizza, but it would definitely be more than a tablespoon. Now I do 50/50 mozzarella/provolone (young). It still tastes pretty good without being so salty.

I guess I can try 2% next time and just see what happens. The reason I'm fussing so much is that it'll be even longer if I should have used more, and more salt will affect the yeast enough that I'm going to be handling strange dough each time I screw with that salt.

This is for a 400ml can so about half that. For the Basil content these are single leaves not sprigs I'm talking about. Agreed on the variability with adjusting salt, I've tried going below 2% before and had issues. The pizapp is good at adjusting the yeast content to account for changes in salt content though. I've not confirmed it gets it right but plan to soon.

Fart Car '97
Jul 23, 2003

o fuk traffic

mediaphage posted:

all i said was that it was a long preheat

there’s no need to get upset about it

All you're accomplishing is potentially dissuading someone from trying it when they could be in a similar situation to me. It's not long if that's what it takes

Cozmosis
Feb 16, 2003

2006... YEAR OF THE BURNITZ, BITCHES

I did preheat the steel for an hour and did a broiler supercharge - used convection for both as I do with the stone. Maybe minimally better bottom browning but otherwise not so different.

May just go back to the stones cause they’re bigger anyway.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


Cozmosis posted:

I did preheat the steel for an hour and did a broiler supercharge - used convection for both as I do with the stone. Maybe minimally better bottom browning but otherwise not so different.

May just go back to the stones cause they’re bigger anyway.

out of curiosity did you leave the broiler on for the cook?

Cozmosis
Feb 16, 2003

2006... YEAR OF THE BURNITZ, BITCHES

mediaphage posted:

out of curiosity did you leave the broiler on for the cook?

Have tried both. I seem to prefer the crust on a convection bake with about a broil half the time.

Rocko Bonaparte
Mar 12, 2002

Every day is Friday!


Anybody have a preference for a pita recipe for a wood-fired oven?

Heck, does anybody have anything else Greek or Middle Eastern they like to cook in a wood-fired oven?

We found a good Lebanese place here and finally got an idea of what some of this stuff could actually taste like, so now we're interested in trying some stuff with it.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


Rocko Bonaparte posted:

Anybody have a preference for a pita recipe for a wood-fired oven?

Heck, does anybody have anything else Greek or Middle Eastern they like to cook in a wood-fired oven?

We found a good Lebanese place here and finally got an idea of what some of this stuff could actually taste like, so now we're interested in trying some stuff with it.

so pita is just white bread cooked in a specific way. you can use just about any lean white bread dough you want, and work a couple of tablespoons of olive oil into it. knead it, let it proof, divide it up into balls. roll the balls out thinly, to 6-7 inches in diameter. let them proof, covered, on a sheet pan for 20 minutes or so.

the key is that second proof after rolled out flat followed by a very hot surface.

ogopogo
Jul 16, 2006
Remember: no matter where you go, there you are.

Yeah, we’ve been messing around with sandwich breads with our sourdough pizza dough that’s at the end of its proof, trying to get the size and rise right has resulted in at least delicious experiments.

Gyro sandwich


Caprese sandwich

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


ogopogo posted:

Yeah, we’ve been messing around with sandwich breads with our sourdough pizza dough that’s at the end of its proof, trying to get the size and rise right has resulted in at least delicious experiments.

Gyro sandwich


Caprese sandwich


would eat both of those mofos

CancerCakes
Jan 10, 2006


If you don't let the pita proove you get really nice soft flat breads which are also good.


Once you have that basic dough down you can change the format easily with just changing the fat content and technique.

I've found soft rolls the hardest because the timings have to be so controlled. Getting that soft bakers bap nailed is my aim for the summer so I can do 100% home made burgers, with home grown salad.

ogopogo
Jul 16, 2006
Remember: no matter where you go, there you are.

poo poo we did it again, this time had the bahn mi guys make a sammich from our bread dough.
Slapped like hell.

LifeSunDeath
Jan 4, 2007

I hated your old avatar so much I paid for this one from a gay furry visual novel. gay rights and smoke weed every day

ogopogo posted:

poo poo we did it again, this time had the bahn mi guys make a sammich from our bread dough.
Slapped like hell.


That looks so next level. There's a really good bahn mi place in my area, they'll add a fried egg to anything for a dollar extra, it really elevates the sandwich.

Rocko Bonaparte
Mar 12, 2002

Every day is Friday!


mediaphage posted:

so pita is just white bread cooked in a specific way. you can use just about any lean white bread dough you want, and work a couple of tablespoons of olive oil into it. knead it, let it proof, divide it up into balls. roll the balls out thinly, to 6-7 inches in diameter. let them proof, covered, on a sheet pan for 20 minutes or so.

the key is that second proof after rolled out flat followed by a very hot surface.

How thick are you targeting with this? I think my wife and I have decided we like them stupidly flat. Like, we're getting into some kind of chewy bread tortilla.

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


Rocko Bonaparte posted:

How thick are you targeting with this? I think my wife and I have decided we like them stupidly flat. Like, we're getting into some kind of chewy bread tortilla.

somewhere between an 1/8th and 1/4 inch thick, i'd wager. certainly you might try each and then bake and see how you like the comparison, and then go from there.

chia
Dec 23, 2005


The best one last night (and in a long time):

Easychair Bootson
May 7, 2004

Where's the last guy?
Ultimo hombre.
Last man standing.
Must've been one.


chia posted:

The best one last night (and in a long time):



That looks amazing

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

mediaphage
Mar 22, 2007

Excuse me, pardon me, sheer perfection coming through


too close to the oven door so not as even as i’d like but overall good crust blisters and bottom bake for my standard range oven.

mozza, basil, tomato, garlic

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply