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politicorific
Sep 15, 2007




Thermopyle posted:

I got tired of my cable modems piss-poor status page, so I made this:



The status page actually looks like this:



I just wrote a little python script to scrape it and dump the info to JSON. Then Telegraf runs that every 10 seconds and dumps it into influxdb and then Graphite graphs it.

I can post the script and more config detail if anyone is interested.

The main reason I did this was next time I have to convince Charter there's actually something wrong with the line I've now got some data to back it up...

(also the stupid modem has an advanced section that has a rolling password of the day for access. AFAICT, no one has cracked the seed for this particular modem in my particular market so I have no idea what info is in there)

This is cool. Yes. Please post details. Do you have a github or another more public space you can host this?

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Charles Mansion
Oct 20, 2008


Young Orc

I recently got a UniFi Security Gateway 3P, UniFi Switch 8 POE-60W, and UniFi AP-AC-Pro. Setup was easy and performance is great, but holy poo poo does the POE switch run hot. Is it ok to let it run without some sort of external fan pointed on it? I guess it could be designed to operate this way but I don't think I've ever had a piece of networking gear run so hot.

unknown
Nov 16, 2002
Ain't got no stinking title yet!

snuff posted:

Sorry if this is the wrong thread.

I've been tasked with finding an internet solution for my apartment complex (20 apartments). We've been offered a cheap 1000/1000 Mbit/s connection but it's a commercial connection so all we get is the modem and we/I have to set up the router and switch.

I was thinking an edgerouter lite and an edgeswitch lite configured so that each apartment gets their own segregated VLAN. Is this hard to set up and maintain? Am I in way over my head? (I don't work in IT and this i just a hobby)

The ideal solution is just to set it and forget it. Maybe a reboot once in a while (the equipment will be in our basement).

Again, I'm sorry if this is the wrong thread for this but I figured someone could weigh in.

Don't. Just don't. I've done this stuff for a living. Don't do it.

Here's where you're going to fail hard - it's not anything physical - it'll be piracy. Using a commercial connection - your complex ownership is now guaranteeing that all it's tenants/users will not download the latest film, do childporn, all that crap. If just one person does it enough, your building connection gets cut off, and the remainder of the contract generally has to get paid out - usually immediately. Is the apartment complex willing to handle that financial risk? Probably not. (In a commercial environment, IT guy finds the culprit and they're [eventually] fired - you don't have that leverage in your setting).

It'll be great when it works, but when it breaks (and it'll break in ways you don't like/want/know) you're going to go through hell. And it'll be at the worst time too since you're residential.

You're going to start dealing with Bob having a cranky day and wanting to play the latest game and his ping times are 10% above what he wants (even though the server is in outer slobania on an isdn connection) and he'll be calling you at 10pm on a Friday when you want to go out with your friends or whatever and ranting for an hour about how the internet sucks and you need to fix it now. You'll spend 2 hours only to learn there's nothing wrong on your side of things. But now your night is finished.

There's cheap technical solutions to what you want to do, but the biggest cost center isn't technical (hasn't been for a while) - it's everything else.

snuff
Jul 16, 2003


Thanks all, I will be giving up on the idea of a shared line. I already have a headache imagining all the poo poo that could happen.

SamDabbers
May 26, 2003

Oh my god...

Lipstick Apathy

snuff posted:

Thanks all, I will be giving up on the idea of a shared line. I already have a headache imagining all the poo poo that could happen.

Maybe the company offering the inexpensive shared line offers a managed service option? It's not unheard-of for a bandwidth provider to plop a managed switch at customer sites and provision different services on various ports.

Antillie
Mar 14, 2015



As unknown mentioned the main issue here is a legal one, not a technical one. You need some way to make each user legally accountable for whatever stupid poo poo they download. That way they get sued and not you. The usual solution is for the ISP to sell connections directly to the people living in the building. That way the tenants are each responsible for their own poo poo and the ISP handles all the tech support. All the building owner has to do is allow the ISP to install the needed wiring to each apartment.

Often times an ISP will want some sort of exclusivity agreement with the building owner when it comes to installing the wiring. This is how you often end up with stupid one no ISP choice situations. But its often the only way to get the ISP to agree to pay the costs of installing the wiring, something few landlords are willing to cover.

Moey
Oct 22, 2010



Wouldn't passing a public IP to each unit cover this? Get a block big enough to cover all the units, give them a static for the WAN side of their crap, document each unit and then call it a day?

I figure it wouldn't be under an individual's name, just the HOA.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005

OFFICIAL BITCH OF DANBO DAXTER




Pillbug

You could do that, it's just it worth it. You're still the owner of those IPs and you're still managing equipment you shouldn't be. It's better to just have the ISP handle it.

Moey
Oct 22, 2010



Good call on that for liability reasons, unless the price per unit is insane.

Lamquin
Aug 11, 2007


I just want to make sure I'm not doing anything wrong before I pull the trigger on this and would appreciate opinions on it - I've had a router given for free by the ISP the last 4-5 years (100mbit & VoIP telephone). It's been at best adequate, but it's frankly time for an upgrade with more tablets, phones and lately a chromecast being added to the WiFi making the thing buckle.

The OP recommends both the Ubiquiti Edgerouter X and the Ubiquiti Unifi AC Lite as an Access point. My goal is to have a network that supports 2 wired PCs, a wired Network Printer, 3 phones, 2 tablets and a TV hooked up to a Chromecast without crashing and burning.

I'm assuming the two Ubiquiti products play nice together and aren't a nightmare to setup? My only experience with Home Networking is "Plugin cables, set Wifi password", but I'm willing to put in the time to learn how to set it up if it means I won't have to reboot the devices every few days.

Mutant Standard
Jun 21, 2007



I need to buy a very secure wired router. Is there a spectrum of security for wired routers? I heard this one was pretty good: https://www.amazon.com/ZyXEL-Genera...0fc2bf30beeb371 But does anybody have a personal recommendation?

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005

OFFICIAL BITCH OF DANBO DAXTER




Pillbug

Well now I'm just interested, what constitutes "very secure" to you? What's the use case?

Mutant Standard
Jun 21, 2007



Internet Explorer posted:

Well now I'm just interested, what constitutes "very secure" to you? What's the use case?

Protection against hacking. Used for a small business.

Actuarial Fables
Jul 29, 2014



Nap Ghost

Lamquin posted:

I just want to make sure I'm not doing anything wrong before I pull the trigger on this and would appreciate opinions on it - I've had a router given for free by the ISP the last 4-5 years (100mbit & VoIP telephone). It's been at best adequate, but it's frankly time for an upgrade with more tablets, phones and lately a chromecast being added to the WiFi making the thing buckle.

The OP recommends both the Ubiquiti Edgerouter X and the Ubiquiti Unifi AC Lite as an Access point. My goal is to have a network that supports 2 wired PCs, a wired Network Printer, 3 phones, 2 tablets and a TV hooked up to a Chromecast without crashing and burning.

I'm assuming the two Ubiquiti products play nice together and aren't a nightmare to setup? My only experience with Home Networking is "Plugin cables, set Wifi password", but I'm willing to put in the time to learn how to set it up if it means I won't have to reboot the devices every few days.

Setting up the Edgerouter is pretty easy. There's a guide to get you going here - it takes you through connecting to the device and running a wizard to get your network set up. You can get it all set up before swapping out your old router, so you can stay connected to the internet if you need help.

The access point is also pretty easy as well, the only hitch is that it's not managed by the router - you have to use the Unifi Controller software on a different device to get it set up. The controller sets the wireless name and network that the access point will use, and allows you to set the IP address of the AP once it's connected to the controller. You don't need to have the controller running for the AP to work once it's all set up.

Photex
Apr 6, 2009



Actuarial Fables posted:

Setting up the Edgerouter is pretty easy. There's a guide to get you going here - it takes you through connecting to the device and running a wizard to get your network set up. You can get it all set up before swapping out your old router, so you can stay connected to the internet if you need help.

The access point is also pretty easy as well, the only hitch is that it's not managed by the router - you have to use the Unifi Controller software on a different device to get it set up. The controller sets the wireless name and network that the access point will use, and allows you to set the IP address of the AP once it's connected to the controller. You don't need to have the controller running for the AP to work once it's all set up.

You can even just do this with the Android or iPhone app now too, works pretty well if you're just doing a quick install.

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005

OFFICIAL BITCH OF DANBO DAXTER




Pillbug

Actuarial Fables posted:

Setting up the Edgerouter is pretty easy. There's a guide to get you going here - it takes you through connecting to the device and running a wizard to get your network set up. You can get it all set up before swapping out your old router, so you can stay connected to the internet if you need help.

The access point is also pretty easy as well, the only hitch is that it's not managed by the router - you have to use the Unifi Controller software on a different device to get it set up. The controller sets the wireless name and network that the access point will use, and allows you to set the IP address of the AP once it's connected to the controller. You don't need to have the controller running for the AP to work once it's all set up.

I've been a big fan of the ERL, but I just set up an install with a USG and Unif WAP and I think if we are going to recommend Unifi WAPs we might as well just recommend the USG to go with it. If you're going to need to set up the controller software anyways, might be easier for most people.

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EL BROMANCE
Jun 10, 2006


I have a device that you connect your phone to, then tell it the wifi details for your setup and it in turn connects to the router. I'm having issues with it at this stage and am wondering if it's an IP thing. I've seen it turn up very briefly in the DHCP list but then disappear again.

The device itself has an internal IP of 192.168.10.1, so I thought I'd reserve this IP on the router for it, but it tells me that's an invalid IP.

My router is currently at 192.168.1.1 with the 255.255.255.0 subnet. Should something with a 10.1 IP be able to connect to this? What should I set the router up as if not? (I read someone's review saying to make sure the router isn't 10.1 as it'll clash, I'm wondering if something similar is happening).

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