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havenwaters
Nov 11, 2011

even speedwagon was trolled


Thanks Ants posted:

I'm confused by this - if you have a device that connects to a Wi-Fi network and rebroadcasts it then that will still work if you change your APs to Unifi models.

The distance is the main issue. It's 70 to 80 meters between the two devices through an interior wall, an exterior wall, possibly an oak tree, and then another exterior wall. I bought one of those $200 something 5 antenna Asus consumer routers to try to hit the whole house and also reach the guest house so it could get some semblance of internet. It gets like 30-40 mbps to the wireless repeater (so 15-20 because half duplex) which is good enough for the guest house. I'm just afraid the UAP won't broadcast far enough unless I buy a stronger one but then I get the other issue with the asus router. Some weaker devices can't talk back to it, mainly a smart tv and chromecast due to that distance. The house is L shaped and the drop for the modem is on one side while that TV is on the exact other side and a straight line from the router to the tv has you going through two to three sets of walls.

edit: Also a wired repeater could be setup in the front half of the house except that led to "I don't want something that intense on my desk and also I still want my laptop to be using wired internet" from a different person in the house. So. Yeah.


Like what I should do is get the edgerouter, maybe get a network switch since I probably need 6 ports from edgerouter to places, and put up one or two UAPs and for port 6 have it be a low powered nanostation through some walls or run cable in conduit. There's that whole "yard where it would be run is underwater when it rains" thing but whatever

havenwaters fucked around with this message at Jan 17, 2018 around 21:06

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Devian666
Aug 19, 2008

Take some advice Chris.



Fun Shoe

Rexxed posted:

OP was updated 8 days ago. You should be good. None of us can answer questions about your amazon delivery speed, only amazon can.

I went through checking all the links and the updates made by mods look good. The picture of the ERLite-3 looks like an earlier generation but I couldn't find a better amazon link.

I'll do updates where I can but I tend to be really busy these days.

E-Diddy
Mar 30, 2004
I'm both hot and bothered

CrazyLittle posted:

I typically recommend two network cables pulled to any location where you might put something. This gives you the option of using one cable for networking and one cable for POTS telephone (if you have one). You can also use one of the cables for PoE networking. If you pull conduit or innerduct with a tow rope then you'll have a direct path from your central wiring to the destination, and you can pull new cables or more cables later as you need them. The biggest cost is the labor of pulling within the house and walls, so getting two cables pulled instead of one shouldn't cost much extra. If you only get one cable pulled to each spot, then you'll have to buy a small dumb switch at each place where you need additional jacks. Having a network full of tiny switches is bad for a lot of reasons.

Keystone jacks are just a standard shape for modular jacks that go into either interior wall plates (like a phone jack plate) or into structured rack panels. One RJ45 jack (ethernet or phone) takes up one keystone jack/slot. You can get keystone plates that fit up to 6 jacks to a single gang low voltage box/bracket and up to 12 in a double gang. This is useful for locations like behind your home theater receiver where you can run TV Coax, multiple network, and surround speaker jacks all to the same box or low-votage bracket.

When I bought my house, I planned out two possible locations for my home theater and paid the wiring guy to pull just 2x cat5e to each spot. Then I went in after him and used the same paths to pull coaxial and speaker wires to where I thought I would need them. My biggest mistake was that I should have just paid him to put in conduit w/ rope so that I could pull whatever I wanted. My attic has blown-in brominated paper insulation. It REALLY loving sucks to crawl up there. If I had conduit then I would have just pulled on the tow rope instead of having to crawl in the attic to some slack cable up and around corners.

Hey again! I have done a ton more research and I think I have what I want now. I have an office and a media room that I would want to have a 6 keystone jack, a living room with a 4 keystone jack, and two other rooms with a 2 keystone jack. That leaves me at 22 ports + 1 going to the router is 23 of the 24 ports on the switch. I'm leaving one open in case I get a security camera system with an NVR and it can just go in that.

I'm trying to decide between these two switches:
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=0XP-000A-000S4
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=0XP-000A-000B1

The Edgeswitch is fanless which is cool since it'll save on power but the Unifi one uses the Unifi software (although I am not sure how much I need that). I've already purchased an Edgerouter X (the 5 port one) and a Unifi AP Pro for the center of the house. The Unifi switch is $170 compared to $200 for the Edgeswitch. What would you recommend?

CrazyLittle posted:

Ceiling mounts can be as simple as a 1/4" hole with a cat5e/cat6 hanging out, and then you just screw the AP's mounting bracket into the drywall. If you wanted to hedge against ever having to patch holes in the ceiling, then you're better off putting a proper ceiling electrical box wherever you want the AP to go, and then mount the AP to the box instead of screws-in-drywall. Also since you're putting a box or bracket (preferably box to prevent insulation from falling down) then you might as well pull a conduit up there so you can pull new/multiple cables into that location if a few years from now 60ghz WiFi (4gbps+) becomes cheap enough that you need to run fiber + power up to your ceiling.

Lots of AP makers have brackets that will attach their APs to a single or double gang box. Here's the one for Ubiquiti UAP-AC-Pro/HD. The UAP-AC-Lite won't fit that bracket because it's physically smaller. I would just drill holes in the mounting plate for that one and screw it into the box that way... or just put screws in the ceiling boards.

I bought one of the Ubiquiti mounting things and it is on its way to my house. One thing I was wondering, though, was about powering the AP Pro. I can't do PoE from the Edgerouter since it's 24v vs. 48v needed to power it. If I wanted to do PoE, could I just buy a 48v injector to power the AP? I wouldn't need to spend money on a PoE switch, would I?

Thanks again!

GnarlyCharlie4u
Sep 23, 2007

I have an unhealthy obsession with motorcycles.

Proof


E-Diddy posted:

I bought one of the Ubiquiti mounting things and it is on its way to my house. One thing I was wondering, though, was about powering the AP Pro. I can't do PoE from the Edgerouter since it's 24v vs. 48v needed to power it. If I wanted to do PoE, could I just buy a 48v injector to power the AP?

Thanks again!
I'm pretty sure the AP comes with a PoE injector. Mine did, but I only bought the single pack. I think the 3 packs do not but I can't remember...

Anyway, wife approved faceplates and jacks and plates came in!
No 2 brands are the same but they all match well enough, so I think we're good to go.


The cable matters jacks came with this nice little tool for holding the jack when punching down.


Armacham
Mar 3, 2007

Then brothers in war, to the skirmish must we hence! Shall we hence?

ER-X is on a good sale at Newegg right now for anyone looking.

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Prod...0W-00080&cm_sp=

39.99 with free shipping with code EMCXEEY35

Twerk from Home
Jan 17, 2009


I could really use a hand with my terrible home network. I just moved, and have been fighting terrible wifi in the new house. I have some knowledge, but it's out of date. In previous houses I owned my own cable modem, put the router and modem at one corner of the house, and a 2nd WAP connected by ethernet lines in the house at the other corner of the house on non-overlapping bands, and everything worked pretty well. I've got about wireless 15 client devices total, mostly non-Apple.

Short story:

AT&T technician tells me that my current networking issues are caused by me changing the SSID / password, and that I should run both 2.4 and 5ghz networks as the same SSID and not change the default password. Is this accurate? If not, why the hell are they telling this to customers! I'm going to try following his advice even though I don't understand it and think it's dumb, because I'm at my wit's end and stuck in a contract with them anyway.

Long story:

I moved somewhere without cable available, and have AT&T UVerse Fiber as about my only option. They gave me a Pace 5268ac router, which functions as both modem and router, and after a ton of reading online I've concluded that I cannot bypass this thing, also it's not capable of gigabit routing. Rather than put the Archer C7 that I used previously as a router, or Netgear R6250 I was using as a WAP behind it, I decided just to try and use what AT&T gave me. I configured it like I had previous WAPs: 2.4 and 5ghz networks on different SSIDs, 2.4 pinned to channel 1 or 11, whichever was less crowded when I scanned, 2.4ghz set to 20mhz bandwidth, 5ghz set to 40mhz bandwidth.

My experience has been horrible. This house isn't wired with cat5, so I've got stuff wireless now that was perviously wired (TV, XBone, etc). 2.4GHz is too crowded to use in the area, and the 5ghz range is awful. Connections get dropped, pings are high, and it's just generally flaky to use. I even bought an AV2000 powerline kit and put the Archer C7 running in WAP mode at the other end of the house.... but the AV2000 kit could only sustain ~40mbps, so best case on wifi from the 2nd WAP was 20-30mbps, usually it was lower.

I had a full-day outage yesterday where any devices connecting to the wifi would get redirected to a "gateway authentication failure" that told me to call AT&T, so I did, and their diagnostic results caused them to send a tech out, who factory reset the router and told me that my outage and awful experience was due to changing the SSID and password, and I shouldn't do that.

My current status after the reset is that things in the same room as the router see insane speeds (over 300mbit), probably due to the 80mhz default channel bandwidth. Everything more than 6 feet from the router is getting band-steered to 2.4ghz, and speedtests under 5mbps, as in the attached picture. Any suggestions? Do I just need to wait out my year with AT&T, and then hope that Google Fiber or Comcast comes to the area and I have the option to pay for 200/20 that works instead of 1000/1000 that doesn't?

Edit: I'm also curious if current best practice is still to have separate SSIDs for 2.4 and 5, and run the smaller channel bandwidths to avoid interference.

Only registered members can see post attachments!

Twerk from Home fucked around with this message at Jan 20, 2018 around 23:44

Inept
Jul 8, 2003

What?

Even if you can't bypass using AT&T's router, you should be able to turn off the built-in wireless and hook up your old router and put it in AP mode to see if signal and speed improve.

If it can't route at gigabit even on wired, I'd complain until AT&T gave you new equipment though.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

E-Diddy posted:

That leaves me at 22 ports + 1 going to the router is 23 of the 24 ports on the switch. I'm leaving one open in case I get a security camera system with an NVR and it can just go in that.
You can always wire jacks but not connect them to a switch in order to stay under 24 total ports into your switch. Also both 24 switches have 24x RJ45 + 2x fiber ports, and you can convert the fiber ports to RJ45 with a copper module, giving you 26 total ports.

E-Diddy posted:

I'm trying to decide between these two switches:
Edgeswitch ES24
UniFi switch US-24
Edgeswitch has more control over some of the advanced features that you're probably not going to mess with. If you're using UniFi APs then it makes sense to stick with the UniFi switch so they're all in the same management interface w/ the UniFi controller.

E-Diddy posted:

I can't do PoE from the Edgerouter since it's 24v vs. 48v needed to power it. If I wanted to do PoE, could I just buy a 48v injector to power the AP? I wouldn't need to spend money on a PoE switch, would I?
Edgerouter PoE is "passthrough PoE" so if you power the whole thing with a 48V 2.5A power supply then you can supply 48V PoE to the devices downstream. The UniFi APs include a PoE injector in the single packs. The 5-pack of UAP-AC-(Pro/Lite) do not include power injectors.


Twerk from Home posted:

AT&T technician tells me that my current networking issues are caused by me changing the SSID / password,
nonsense

Twerk from Home posted:

and that I should run both 2.4 and 5ghz networks as the same SSID
Sure.

Twerk from Home posted:

and not change the default password. Is this accurate?
nonsense

Twerk from Home posted:

If not, why the hell are they telling this to customers!
If you don't know or don't have time or don't care to understand the root cause of a network problem, the easiest path to "fix" is to simply reset everything back to basics to eliminate any "too-creative-for-their-own-good" settings.

Twerk from Home posted:

AT&T UVerse Fiber ... They gave me a Pace 5268ac router, ... it's not capable of gigabit routing.
Yeah, you won't be able to bypass it entirely, and even if you did all the fancy network wizard tricks of getting around that Pace, you'd still need it somewhere in the mix because each one has a burned-in SHA hash key that's required for service activation/verification. That said, they're definitely capable of gigabit throughput, but there's other limitations that you'll probably hit first.

Twerk from Home posted:

their diagnostic results caused them to send a tech out, who factory reset the router and told me that my outage and awful experience was due to changing the SSID and password, and I shouldn't do that.
This actually IS within the realm of possibility - Yeah, making changes in the Pace menus can actually break poo poo sometimes. The menu systems are really really bad. But of course you can just factory reset and redo your settings at any time.

Twerk from Home posted:

My current status after the reset is that things in the same room as the router see insane speeds (over 300mbit), probably due to the 80mhz default channel bandwidth. Everything more than 6 feet from the router is getting band-steered to 2.4ghz, and speedtests under 5mbps,
The wider the channel, the shorter the range. 5ghz doesn't penetrate walls for poo poo anyways, so you're going to get bumped from it anyways. Take your old APs, turn off DHCP etc, turn them into APs and run cable to them elsewhere in the house.

CrazyLittle fucked around with this message at Jan 21, 2018 around 07:18

phosdex
Dec 16, 2005



that at&t tech comes from a place where you take calls all day from grandmas and grandpas who can't remember their wifi password and then the techs have to walk them through connecting a smart tv to it.

Boris Galerkin
Dec 17, 2011


Yeah they are telling their customers not to change anything because that way it's easier for some random phone support guy to say "ok, to connect to wifi just look on the sticker on the back of your router that says "SSID: ATT_YOUR_ACCOUNT_NUMBER and connect to that with the password printed under it."

"Oh you don't see it? Ok just unplug the router and plug it back in, with the "reset" button pressed and wait a few minutes for it to restart. That wifi network should now show up again."

iajanus
Aug 17, 2004

That's a nice team.
It'll be a shame if something happened to it.

Team Anasta


Hi.

This will sound like stupid overkill, because it is. I'm wiring up our house (via electrician since I don't want to die) with cat6 and putting our modem/router/etc in the garage with eth going to all other rooms (for a heap of other computers, a file server, a plex server and a bunch of random things). I've already got a 24port patch panel in a rack waiting in the garage for my electrician to arrive, and was wondering what switch to get to pair it with. Because of limited shopping resources in the technology wasteland that I live in I'm limited to the below models, and was hoping to get some advice about which would be the best bang for buck. They're all about the same price, so I'm more curious on features/reputation/intangibles.

Netgear JGS524
Netgear GS324-100AUS
TP-LINK TL-SG1024DE
TP-LINK TL-SG1024D
D-Link DGS-1024D

Thanks for the help. I've done some research but have been going around in circles so wanted to get some saner opinions.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

If you're looking at smart/managed switches, read the manuals first and make sure it's got a standard web browser interface or telnet/SSH. Don't get switches that require proprietary clients to configure like some of the Netgear poo poo.

havent heard a peep
May 29, 2003

When Steve Jobs died it wasn't the first job I'd lost that week.


Just got 1Gbps fiber and torrents are slow as balls both down/up. Opened up the ports and verified on the most expensive Linksys router not sure if I need to start using a VPN or what. Literally the highest speed has been 5Mbps. I'll do some regular downloads to see what I can pull off.

redeyes
Sep 14, 2002
I LOVE THE WHITE STRIPES!

havent heard a peep posted:

Just got 1Gbps fiber and torrents are slow as balls both down/up. Opened up the ports and verified on the most expensive Linksys router not sure if I need to start using a VPN or what. Literally the highest speed has been 5Mbps. I'll do some regular downloads to see what I can pull off.

Which service is it? It would be nice to know for other torrent goons.

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





CrazyLittle posted:

You can always wire jacks but not connect them to a switch in order to stay under 24 total ports into your switch. Also both 24 switches have 24x RJ45 + 2x fiber ports, and you can convert the fiber ports to RJ45 with a copper module, giving you 26 total ports.

Caveat to this: some lovely managed switches share the SFP ports with two copper ports, so using the SFP disables one of the RJ45s.

Twerk from Home
Jan 17, 2009


CrazyLittle posted:

This actually IS within the realm of possibility - Yeah, making changes in the Pace menus can actually break poo poo sometimes. The menu systems are really really bad. But of course you can just factory reset and redo your settings at any time.

The wider the channel, the shorter the range. 5ghz doesn't penetrate walls for poo poo anyways, so you're going to get bumped from it anyways. Take your old APs, turn off DHCP etc, turn them into APs and run cable to them elsewhere in the house.

Thanks. I really appreciate this, and may just end up having to factory reset the Pace thing occasionally. My setup isn't that complex, I've just got a couple of ports forwarded to a home server running on a static internal IP. Given that I'm in a 2-story house with no attic or basement, I'm going to call a low-voltage guy to see how much it would be to pull some Cat6 and distribute WAPs.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

IOwnCalculus posted:

Caveat to this: some lovely managed switches share the SFP ports with two copper ports, so using the SFP disables one of the RJ45s.

Yes, but not in the case of the two Ubiquiti switches in question.

E-Diddy
Mar 30, 2004
I'm both hot and bothered

CrazyLittle posted:

You can always wire jacks but not connect them to a switch in order to stay under 24 total ports into your switch. Also both 24 switches have 24x RJ45 + 2x fiber ports, and you can convert the fiber ports to RJ45 with a copper module, giving you 26 total ports.

CrazyLittle posted:

Edgeswitch has more control over some of the advanced features that you're probably not going to mess with. If you're using UniFi APs then it makes sense to stick with the UniFi switch so they're all in the same management interface w/ the UniFi controller.

CrazyLittle posted:

Edgerouter PoE is "passthrough PoE" so if you power the whole thing with a 48V 2.5A power supply then you can supply 48V PoE to the devices downstream. The UniFi APs include a PoE injector in the single packs. The 5-pack of UAP-AC-(Pro/Lite) do not include power injectors.

Excellent insight, thank you! I'll probably get a 48V power supply for the router just in case I do use those that on the router. I am having someone come over to the house on Thursday about the job. I have a couple more quesitons. I went with your recommendation on the Unifi switch since the Unifi Controller for that and the AP is probably some convenience I will desire. That switch had a fan, does that mean it'll be ok to put in a closet? I was thinking of having the modem, switch, and router in the top shelf of a coat closet in the entry hallway. Should I move that stuff somewhere that'll get more air? I read that the fan can be loud unless you swap it out with a different one and I'd rather not have to mess with it.

My second question: I am buying a big spool of Cat6a cable. I am seeing STP, UTP, and FTP. I am familiar with STP and UTP from my Cisco networking classes back in high school but I can't say I've heard of FTP. It has a $40 premium on Monoprice and I am not sure if I need anything past UTP it considering I will be buying the innerduct you recommended in an earlier post. If I am running as many as 6 cables to a couple of the gang boxes, would the shielding help any?

Texibus
May 18, 2008


What is the recommended wireless router for a medium sized home these days? Lots of devices connecting wireless to it and about 4 hardwired.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!


Texibus posted:

What is the recommended wireless router for a medium sized home these days? Lots of devices connecting wireless to it and about 4 hardwired.

Define "lots." Over 20 and I'd look at a ubiquiti wireless access point + wired router. Under that and a consumer router will probably be alright. The OP mentions TP-Link Archers and I've had good luck with ASUS AC routers, I'd just get whatever's cheapest of those.

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redeyes
Sep 14, 2002
I LOVE THE WHITE STRIPES!

E-Diddy posted:

Excellent insight, thank you! I'll probably get a 48V power supply for the router just in case I do use those that on the router. I am having someone come over to the house on Thursday about the job. I have a couple more quesitons. I went with your recommendation on the Unifi switch since the Unifi Controller for that and the AP is probably some convenience I will desire. That switch had a fan, does that mean it'll be ok to put in a closet? I was thinking of having the modem, switch, and router in the top shelf of a coat closet in the entry hallway. Should I move that stuff somewhere that'll get more air? I read that the fan can be loud unless you swap it out with a different one and I'd rather not have to mess with it.

My second question: I am buying a big spool of Cat6a cable. I am seeing STP, UTP, and FTP. I am familiar with STP and UTP from my Cisco networking classes back in high school but I can't say I've heard of FTP. It has a $40 premium on Monoprice and I am not sure if I need anything past UTP it considering I will be buying the innerduct you recommended in an earlier post. If I am running as many as 6 cables to a couple of the gang boxes, would the shielding help any?
How long are the runs? Are they going around stuff with a lot of EM interference? Chances are no.

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