Register a SA Forums Account here!
JOINING THE SA FORUMS WILL REMOVE THIS BIG AD, THE ANNOYING UNDERLINED ADS, AND STUPID INTERSTITIAL ADS!!!

You can: log in, read the tech support FAQ, or request your lost password. This dumb message (and those ads) will appear on every screen until you register! Get rid of this crap by registering your own SA Forums Account and joining roughly 150,000 Goons, for the one-time price of $9.95! We charge money because it costs us $3,400 per month for bandwidth bills alone, and since we don't believe in shoving popup ads to our registered users, we try to make the money back through forum registrations.
«372 »
  • Post
  • Reply
Laserface
Dec 24, 2004

Sipping harsh elixir,
the ice above us melting fast


Armacham posted:

You could easily just plug a router or access point into your powerline endpoint. Setup will depend on exactly what you purchase.

true, I guess I was looking for something I assumed existed but added some complexity.

I have an old airport express kicking around, although the last time I used that apparently their repeating/extending functionality is reserved for Airport extremes, not just any old router (it didnt work with my old router, a netgear WNDR3700 for example)


should that work, or should I just look into getting a dedicated extender/repeater from this decade?

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

KingKapalone
Dec 20, 2005
1/16 Native American + 1/2 Hungarian = Totally Badass

It seems like the OP is up to date based on the recent posts, but I will say it's confusing for someone dropping in for a quick recommendation that the first line of the OP says it was updated in 2016.

Telling my friend to get an Archer C5 and a Surfboard SB6183 to use with his Comcast cable. That modem should work with the biggest ISP right?

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


A 6183 should be fine, but you always want to make sure itís an approved modem for the provider and works with their speed tier. Odds are itís fine.

TheFluff
Dec 13, 2006

LISTEN TO ME
I AM A SEAGULL
OF WEALTH AND TASTE


Grimey Drawer

KingKapalone posted:

It seems like the OP is up to date based on the recent posts, but I will say it's confusing for someone dropping in for a quick recommendation that the first line of the OP says it was updated in 2016.

Telling my friend to get an Archer C5 and a Surfboard SB6183 to use with his Comcast cable. That modem should work with the biggest ISP right?

The thread title is there for a reason, you know. Networking moves far more slowly than most other computer hardware, and there haven't really been any meaningful new features on consumer devices since 802.11ac launched back in 2013 (or at least not ones that would require hardware upgrades). I have an Asus RT-AC68U which was launched that year, and it's still a top seller according to a local price comparison site, and it's still getting regular firmware updates. In fact, they rolled out an update that added a pretty significant feature (mesh networking with other Asus routers/AP's) just a few months ago.

TheFluff fucked around with this message at May 16, 2018 around 16:09

Armacham
Mar 3, 2007

Then brothers in war, to the skirmish must we hence! Shall we hence?

Laserface posted:

true, I guess I was looking for something I assumed existed but added some complexity.

I have an old airport express kicking around, although the last time I used that apparently their repeating/extending functionality is reserved for Airport extremes, not just any old router (it didnt work with my old router, a netgear WNDR3700 for example)


should that work, or should I just look into getting a dedicated extender/repeater from this decade?

I've actually used an Airport Express as an extender/AP before, with a DD-WRT router before. THis doesn't mean there won't be some incompatibilities though. Check out these instructions and see if they work for you before you go purchasing something else. https://manski.net/2013/05/extendin...irport-express/

Internet Explorer
Jun 1, 2005

OFFICIAL BITCH OF DANBO DAXTER




Oven Wrangler

TheFluff posted:

The thread title is there for a reason, you know. Networking moves far more slowly than most other computer hardware, and there haven't really been any meaningful new features on consumer devices since 802.11ac launched back in 2013 (or at least not ones that would require hardware upgrades). My Asus RT-AC68U was launched that year, it's still a top seller, and it's still getting regular firmware updates. In fact, they rolled out an update that added a pretty significant feature (mesh networking with other Asus routers/AP's) just a few months ago.

I agree with what you are saying, but it may make sense for the OP to update it with a new date so people are more comfortable with it. At least it implies someone looked over it and said "yes, this is still relevant."

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

KingKapalone posted:

It seems like the OP is up to date based on the recent posts, but I will say it's confusing for someone dropping in for a quick recommendation that the first line of the OP says it was updated in 2016.

If you have any suggested changes, pm a mod

KingKapalone
Dec 20, 2005
1/16 Native American + 1/2 Hungarian = Totally Badass

CrazyLittle posted:

If you have any suggested changes, pm a mod

Not to the products. That's why I'm here for recommendations. The header could just be changed to say it was updated in 2018. When I see 2016 it makes me think that maybe the thread title is from 2016 too.

Anyway, I didn't realize that my friend bought a house so maybe the Archer C5 wouldn't give out a strong enough wifi signal. It's 4 bedrooms and 2,000 sq ft. Would he need to get a wifi extender or mesh system?

SwissArmyDruid
Feb 14, 2014



Are there any known-bad batches of Ubiquiti Edgerouter Xes?

I ask this, because I have one in my possession that refuses to behave properly. I keep digging it out of the bottom of the drawer it resides in, and :

Reset the thing
Set my IP to 192.168.1.50
Update the firmware
Reset to default config
Run the WLAN-2LAN2 wizard
Reboot

And at this point, everything inevitably goes off the rails. I'm supposed to be able to reset my ethernet port back to DHCP, and get an IP address from the router, but I still can't get an IP address, and still must manually set an IP address in order to access the interface.

I *am* using an SFP adapter to give me one extra ethernet port, for WLAN, 4LAN, and one POE LAN out to the AP, but whether I have the SFP adapter plugged in or not, makes no difference.

Devian666
Aug 19, 2008

Take some advice Chris.



Fun Shoe

I upgraded my powerline adapters to a couple of D-Link AV700s which run AV2 at 2000 mbps. I haven't done any serious testing but I was getting file transfer speeds of 46-48 MB/s one way last night. Not sure if the bottleneck is the powerline network or the NAS but I suspect it's probably the powerline networking. Still I'm pretty happy with that as transfering ISOs across the network has been an issue lately.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

SwissArmyDruid posted:

Are there any known-bad batches of Ubiquiti Edgerouter Xes?

I ask this, because I have one in my possession that refuses to behave properly. I keep digging it out of the bottom of the drawer it resides in, and :

Sounds like you cooked it to death. If it's under 1 yr you should be able to RMA it.

KingKapalone posted:

Anyway, I didn't realize that my friend bought a house so maybe the Archer C5 wouldn't give out a strong enough wifi signal. It's 4 bedrooms and 2,000 sq ft. Would he need to get a wifi extender or mesh system?

All radio transmitters are limited by total effective power by the government (varies per country.) So it doesn't matter how fancy your router is, they will all have the same legal maximum transmit power limit. It's called ERP or EIRP: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effective_radiated_power - basically you can have 1 watt of transmit power for a spherical omnidirectional antenna, or else you can have a more focused antenna with less wattage, ie directional or point-to-point.

Yes your friend either needs to run cable and put access points elsewhere in his house, or get a mesh wifi system that tries to backhaul internet connectivity over wifi between the mesh units

CrazyLittle fucked around with this message at May 17, 2018 around 09:11

SwissArmyDruid
Feb 14, 2014



It hasn't been plugged in in the bottom of said drawer. It's just where I throw the drat thing every time I try to get it working again, fail at the same spot every time, and get fed up.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

SwissArmyDruid posted:

It hasn't been plugged in in the bottom of said drawer. It's just where I throw the drat thing every time I try to get it working again, fail at the same spot every time, and get fed up.

Ah. well if you want to toss me a backup copy of your generated config I can take a look at it.

politicorific
Sep 15, 2007


SwissArmyDruid posted:

Are there any known-bad batches of Ubiquiti Edgerouter Xes?

I ask this, because I have one in my possession that refuses to behave properly. I keep digging it out of the bottom of the drawer it resides in, and :

Reset the thing
Set my IP to 192.168.1.50
Update the firmware
Reset to default config
Run the WLAN-2LAN2 wizard
Reboot

And at this point, everything inevitably goes off the rails. I'm supposed to be able to reset my ethernet port back to DHCP, and get an IP address from the router, but I still can't get an IP address, and still must manually set an IP address in order to access the interface.

I *am* using an SFP adapter to give me one extra ethernet port, for WLAN, 4LAN, and one POE LAN out to the AP, but whether I have the SFP adapter plugged in or not, makes no difference.

I have heard that some batches of edgelite routers had poor quality flash memory. Maybe youíre unlucky.

knox_harrington
Feb 18, 2011
Running no point.

I have an edgerouter lite which I bought back in 2013 that had the flash storage issues. The device itself worked pretty well, but if it had its power disconnected would fail to restart 50% of the time and ended up just dying. It turns out that the storage on those things is just a standard USB stick and the quality was not great. If you replace it with just another USB drive (I had to bodge one a bit to get it to fit) containing the OS it eliminates the problem completely.

As I understand it the ER-X doesn't use the same USB storage, just the ER-L and ER-POE.

KingKapalone
Dec 20, 2005
1/16 Native American + 1/2 Hungarian = Totally Badass

CrazyLittle posted:

Sounds like you cooked it to death. If it's under 1 yr you should be able to RMA it.


All radio transmitters are limited by total effective power by the government (varies per country.) So it doesn't matter how fancy your router is, they will all have the same legal maximum transmit power limit. It's called ERP or EIRP: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effective_radiated_power - basically you can have 1 watt of transmit power for a spherical omnidirectional antenna, or else you can have a more focused antenna with less wattage, ie directional or point-to-point.

Yes your friend either needs to run cable and put access points elsewhere in his house, or get a mesh wifi system that tries to backhaul internet connectivity over wifi between the mesh units

What access point is recommended for people who don't know how to use Ubiquiti? Do cables need to be run to use an access point? Can't they just be within the range of the wifi and then it boosts the signal? Would the google mesh wifi be the recommendation there?

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

politicorific posted:

I have heard that some batches of edgelite routers had poor quality flash memory. Maybe youíre unlucky.
Yeah, what knox_harrington said above.

Edgerouter Lite and Edgerouter PoE routers have a 4gb USB stick inside for their flash memory. The early batches had a higher than average failure rate on the read/write lifetime of the USB storage. You could fix a broken USB drive by replacing it with another USB stick of similar shape and capacity, and then running some boot-flashing software with access through the console port.



KingKapalone posted:

What access point is recommended for people who don't know how to use Ubiquiti?

Would the google mesh wifi be the recommendation there?
If you're not touching the UniFi AP configuration often (ie never) and you don't have a bunch of them to keep in sync, upgrade firmwares etc, then there's a IOS / Android app that's really easy to use for configuring UniFi access points. Otherwise, yeah, Google WiFi and other mesh WiFi products are probably the best bet.

KingKapalone posted:

Do cables need to be run to use an access point?
Typically yes. Wired is best, but wireless uplinks are possible with UniFi (not recommended) or else get a mesh WiFi system that's designed to use wireless uplinks.

KingKapalone posted:

Can't they just be within the range of the wifi and then it boosts the signal?
WiFi speed is a function of signal strength. Weak signal means slow throughput. If you hang a WiFi booster off of a weak signal, the fastest speed you can get while connected to the booster is as fast as the weak signal, divided in half, and then divided again by the number of other devices connected to the booster.

WiFi mesh systems like Google WiFi add additional radios so they can operate a hidden "mesh" network so that your client-device access isn't sharing the same frequency as the AP-to-AP connections. That increases the hardware cost, but also gives a significant boost in throughput.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


Question for the UniFi AP users in this thread. What kind of range are you seeing with your AP? Getting closer to finishing the new house, starting to finalize my plans.

For reference, floorplan photos. bottom floor about 2K sq ft, 2nd floor about 1400.

1st floor https://i.imgur.com/M9lu54d.png

2nd floor https://i.imgur.com/avibDR5.png

I have Ethernet ran to every room, so wireless is going to be mostly for mobile devices and smart home stuff. Quality connection more important raw speed. I'm thinking 2 AP's on the first floor. The first one in the front hall towards the front of the house between the garage and bedroom, a second one towards the rear of the house. I'd like enough coverage to cover the garage, a doorbell camera, and the back patio with a solid signal.

The second floor a single AP in a centralized position in the hall should suffice I think. I'll ceiling mount the AP's.

I'm thinking 3 AC-Lite's should do the trick as far as wifi coverage goes. Unless they're so strong the upstairs unit will cover the front half of the downstairs part of the house as well. Any reason to spring for the Pro's instead?

Steakandchips
Apr 30, 2009



skipdogg posted:

I have Ethernet ran to every room, so wireless is going to be mostly for mobile devices and smart home stuff. Quality connection more important raw speed.

I have your situation, and I have put an AP in every room. I went with used unifi APs from ebay, so 30 quid a pop. Rock solid connection in each room.

There is no reason for you to use the pro versions.

El Jebus
Jun 18, 2008


skipdogg posted:

Question for the UniFi AP users in this thread. What kind of range are you seeing with your AP? Getting closer to finishing the new house, starting to finalize my plans.

For reference, floorplan photos. bottom floor about 2K sq ft, 2nd floor about 1400.

1st floor https://i.imgur.com/M9lu54d.png

2nd floor https://i.imgur.com/avibDR5.png

I have Ethernet ran to every room, so wireless is going to be mostly for mobile devices and smart home stuff. Quality connection more important raw speed. I'm thinking 2 AP's on the first floor. The first one in the front hall towards the front of the house between the garage and bedroom, a second one towards the rear of the house. I'd like enough coverage to cover the garage, a doorbell camera, and the back patio with a solid signal.

The second floor a single AP in a centralized position in the hall should suffice I think. I'll ceiling mount the AP's.

I'm thinking 3 AC-Lite's should do the trick as far as wifi coverage goes. Unless they're so strong the upstairs unit will cover the front half of the downstairs part of the house as well. Any reason to spring for the Pro's instead?

Iíve got one AC Lite for 1750 sq ft (single floor) in a similar layout. You would probably be fine with one upstairs over the garage and another on the first floor over the great room. But you really wonít know if thatís sufficient until itís time to do it.

thiazi
Sep 27, 2002


skipdogg posted:

Question for the UniFi AP users in this thread. What kind of range are you seeing with your AP? Getting closer to finishing the new house, starting to finalize my plans.

For reference, floorplan photos. bottom floor about 2K sq ft, 2nd floor about 1400.

1st floor https://i.imgur.com/M9lu54d.png

2nd floor https://i.imgur.com/avibDR5.png

I have Ethernet ran to every room, so wireless is going to be mostly for mobile devices and smart home stuff. Quality connection more important raw speed. I'm thinking 2 AP's on the first floor. The first one in the front hall towards the front of the house between the garage and bedroom, a second one towards the rear of the house. I'd like enough coverage to cover the garage, a doorbell camera, and the back patio with a solid signal.

The second floor a single AP in a centralized position in the hall should suffice I think. I'll ceiling mount the AP's.

I'm thinking 3 AC-Lite's should do the trick as far as wifi coverage goes. Unless they're so strong the upstairs unit will cover the front half of the downstairs part of the house as well. Any reason to spring for the Pro's instead?

My house is similarly sized and I'm very happy with just two AC Lites, and frankly one did pretty darn good on its own. I'd say start with one or two and see how it goes - because you already have Ethernet everywhere it'll be easy to add more if you need them.

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

skipdogg posted:

I'm thinking 3 AC-Lite's should do the trick as far as wifi coverage goes. Unless they're so strong the upstairs unit will cover the front half of the downstairs part of the house as well. Any reason to spring for the Pro's instead?

You can set the APs to "high" power but that doesn't mean the IoT devices have a strong enough transmitter built-in to talk back. I think your floorplan looks fine. You don't need UAP-AC-Pro's unless you're trying to get more speed over single connections and need the 3x3 MIMO radios. If you wanted speed, you should be getting the UAP-nanoHD instead anyways since they have 4x4 MU-MIMO.

SwissArmyDruid
Feb 14, 2014



I have my dad's house rigged up on a single UniFi AC Lite. Single story, the lot is about 5000 ft^2, some brick walls along the front and back side of the house leftover from the last remodel, and you can't go below 4 bars (as unscienficially measured by my android phone's top bar) anywhere on the lot.

Not even mounted correctly, he just threw it into the attic, instead of punching a wire down and surface mounting it properly to the ceiling.

A day or two, and I can take some better measurements with wifi analyzer.

SwissArmyDruid fucked around with this message at May 18, 2018 around 00:17

Ham Sandwiches
Jul 7, 2000



Laserface posted:

I rent and I have a dual band router at one end of the house that unfortunately cant be relocated as thats where the coax comes in for my cable internet. I run my PC/NAS into the router at that end of the house with the direct path running through the kitchen wall, the fridge, the cupboards and another wall to the loungeroom.

I run Powerline AV to the loungeroom for Xbox/AppleTV. I think its gigabit, maybe, probably 500mbps.

the loungeroom gets bad wifi. This is where we are using the wireless devices most of the time, in addition to the yard which has poor cell coverage (which is also 1 storey below the lounge)

is there any powerline endpoints that function like wifi APs that I should be looking at? Ideally one that uses the powerline as the backbone but uses the same SSID so its seamless.

TP-Link sells Powerline gear with an integrated AP. I haven't used it and I don't know if it's any good, but that sounds like exactly what you're asking for, so perhaps it's worth trying from a store like Amazon or Best Buy with a decent return policy?

https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-Home...26606930&sr=8-1

If you need to search for it yourself look for tp-link av2000 wifi and you should find it. The model number seems to be TL-WPA9610 but sometimes they vary for retail vs online.

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

I came here to post a powerline question of my own:

I've got a pair of ancient TP-Link AV500 adaptors and now they are starting to show their age by making the connection hang for about 10 seconds every few minutes. I guess they're about 5+ years old and overheating.

I'm a bit better at configuring networking than I was 5 years ago and want to run the machine on a vlan. If I buy a pair of cheap TP-Link adaptors like these AV600's as a replacement will they handle a vlan tag on the packets?

ErikTheRed
Mar 12, 2007

My name is Deckard Cain and I've come on out to greet ya, so sit your ass and listen or I'm gonna have to beat ya.

Tab8715 posted:

I went ahead and picked up the Archer C7. Is it worthwhile to flash this to DDWRT? What do I miss out on?

I've actually had much better luck with OpenWRT vs DDWRT. The only thing you'll miss from the stock firmware is the hardware NAT, which only comes into play if you have a very high bandwidth connection that you're trying to max out.

apropos man
Sep 5, 2016

You get a hundred and forty one thousand years and you're out in eight!

If I'm connecting a pair of dumb powerline adaptors just to access 1 machine then it doesn't matter is the powerlines use vlan tagging or not, does it?

So long as the switch that the pair of adaptors is connected to is tagging the packets and sending them via the vlan then the powerline doesn't have to get involved??

insularis
Sep 21, 2002

Donated $20. Get well, Lowtax.

Fun Shoe

Looking for suggestions/opinions ...

I have a decent size home network with an ESXi server and a FreeNAS array, along with Unifi WiFi gear and cameras, plus the normal PCs/laptops/tablets/printer.

Right now, I'm on an old HP ProCurve 24 port gigabit switch for most of it with a couple of smaller unmanaged ProCurve switches around the house. The FreeNAS and ESXi box communicate to that network over gigabit, and to each other via direct connection between two Mellanox ConnectX-2 cards with a DAC cable.

I'm looking at adding another server soon. Time to get some form of switch that can support both my old gear and provide 10GbE interconnects between the two ESXi servers and FreeNAS. I'm hoping to get by with something managed, with at least 4 10GbE ports that can communicate amongst themselves and the rest of the network, and eliminate the direct 10GbE connection aspect. Used/refurbished is fine with me. I'd rather not buy new PCI-E cards for the servers.

Any suggestions on the switch and cabling/optics?

Ham Sandwiches
Jul 7, 2000



apropos man posted:

I came here to post a powerline question of my own:

I've got a pair of ancient TP-Link AV500 adaptors and now they are starting to show their age by making the connection hang for about 10 seconds every few minutes. I guess they're about 5+ years old and overheating.

I'm a bit better at configuring networking than I was 5 years ago and want to run the machine on a vlan. If I buy a pair of cheap TP-Link adaptors like these AV600's as a replacement will they handle a vlan tag on the packets?

There are several standards for Powerline:

AV500, AV600, AV1200, and AV2000

Depending on how much you want to spend, you'll typically get better signal, reliability, and noise rejection on the later specs which also add 2x2 mimo. If you are looking to save $80 then yeah the AV600s will be a better choice for that. If you started to have drops then either the hardware has failed as you suspect, or someone plugged in a new device that is really poorly behaved. For whatever reason iphone and android chargers if they're slightly off seem to generate really high amounts of electrical noise, more than one would expect for such a small device.

I did some googling for VLAN tagging and the answer is: it depends. It's manufacturer specific, there's some posts on the Linksys forum from 2016 saying it works with Linksys powerline gear. I couldn't find anything about the TP-link gear either way, no mention of 802.1Q.

I think the standard caveat of "buy from somewhere with a decent return policy" applies here as well. Hope you get things resolved.

Adbot
ADBOT LOVES YOU

IOwnCalculus
Apr 2, 2003





apropos man posted:

If I'm connecting a pair of dumb powerline adaptors just to access 1 machine then it doesn't matter is the powerlines use vlan tagging or not, does it?

So long as the switch that the pair of adaptors is connected to is tagging the packets and sending them via the vlan then the powerline doesn't have to get involved??



Are you going to send any traffic that isn't VLAN 10 over that port? If not, then configure the port to be untagged on VLAN 10. You only need to send tags with traffic if you're using one port for more than one VLAN.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Post
  • Reply
«372 »