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22 Eargesplitten
Oct 10, 2010

Also sexism, religious bias, jingoism, and so on. Don't do it, people!

Dogs, don't do it either, even if the police man really tries to train you to do it.


Does the Catalyst series not count as business, or am I misunderstanding? This is going to be in the basement underneath the stairs so noise isn't really a big concern. Were you saying that I'm not going to find anything comparable in the consumer grade realm?

I finally found at least one of the cables that goes to the office, so now I'm getting a surprisingly high speed through an N-band router. Got a speedtest of 936mbps down and 945mbps up through a WDR-3600. Presumably it couldn't do both at once, but I was expecting it to cap out at about 800 total throughput, so even that's a bump.

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Thanks Ants
May 21, 2004

Bless You Ants, Blants



Fun Shoe

Be aware that the old Catalyst draws 160W of power where a more modern managed gigabit switch will be in the 20s.

22 Eargesplitten
Oct 10, 2010

Also sexism, religious bias, jingoism, and so on. Don't do it, people!

Dogs, don't do it either, even if the police man really tries to train you to do it.


Huh, that could add up really fast, although it depends on how much it's actually using at a given time. I assume it's not 160w 24/7, but computers are being used like 12-16 hours a day in the house, so that's still not great. Maybe I should stick with finding a smaller non-managed switch for cheap. This thing would be like $20 at most, probably less. That's why I was interested in it. Between the Edgerouter Lite for $50 and the switch for $20 that's everything for $70 (plus mounting the switch)

edit: Oh, apparently switches are much cheaper than I thought.

Given that I'm just dealing with a house and not a business environment, is there a point to getting a managed switch when I can just do QoS / Vlans / what the gently caress ever else on the router? I feel like I might as well just pick up one of the unmanaged switches in the OP, since even if I want to do QoS or Vlaning I have three ports on an Edgerouter Lite, which means two not being used by the switch. That should be plenty for my use case. From what I'm reading, throughput on a switch isn't nearly as much of an issue as it is on a router, right? Do I need to be looking at the throughput specs on basic unmanaged level 2 switches?

22 Eargesplitten fucked around with this message at Jun 23, 2018 around 10:49

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!


22 Eargesplitten posted:

Huh, that could add up really fast, although it depends on how much it's actually using at a given time. I assume it's not 160w 24/7, but computers are being used like 12-16 hours a day in the house, so that's still not great. Maybe I should stick with finding a smaller non-managed switch for cheap. This thing would be like $20 at most, probably less. That's why I was interested in it. Between the Edgerouter Lite for $50 and the switch for $20 that's everything for $70 (plus mounting the switch)

edit: Oh, apparently switches are much cheaper than I thought.

Given that I'm just dealing with a house and not a business environment, is there a point to getting a managed switch when I can just do QoS / Vlans / what the gently caress ever else on the router? I feel like I might as well just pick up one of the unmanaged switches in the OP, since even if I want to do QoS or Vlaning I have three ports on an Edgerouter Lite, which means two not being used by the switch. That should be plenty for my use case. From what I'm reading, throughput on a switch isn't nearly as much of an issue as it is on a router, right? Do I need to be looking at the throughput specs on basic unmanaged level 2 switches?

I don't think a managed switch is useful in a house unless you want to tinker with it or have some specific goals in mind that require that kind of functionality. You can also home lab virtual switches if you want to learn stuff. I have TP-Link and Trendnet unmanaged switches for most of my stuff and they've been fine. I also have an old dell powerconnect 24 port managed switch but I never got around to using any of the functionality it would give me beyond basic switching and the 40mm fans were annoying as hell. I did do a little electronics project to build a PWM fan controller to quiet them down, but they're still louder than the completely silent unmanaged switch I replaced it with.

H2SO4
Sep 11, 2001

put your money in a log cabin




Buglord

22 Eargesplitten posted:

HP DL380 G4 (8gb RAM)

good loving god, no

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

22 Eargesplitten posted:

Does the Catalyst series not count as business, or am I misunderstanding? This is going to be in the basement underneath the stairs so noise isn't really a big concern. Were you saying that I'm not going to find anything comparable in the consumer grade realm?

I finally found at least one of the cables that goes to the office, so now I'm getting a surprisingly high speed through an N-band router. Got a speedtest of 936mbps down and 945mbps up through a WDR-3600. Presumably it couldn't do both at once, but I was expecting it to cap out at about 800 total throughput, so even that's a bump.

If you have use for a 24 port gigabit switch, consumer grade switches tend to be overpriced junk. Business switches like Cisco Catalyst will be overkill but like Ants says, it'll also be power hungry. Even newer gigabit switches use less power for the same functionality just because they're newer more modern chips.

If you don't need 24 ports then 16-port consumer unmanaged gigabit switches like TP-Link or Netgear are just fine.

skipdogg
Nov 29, 2004
Resident SRT-4 Expert


I close on the new place in a month and power draw is at the top of my list of things to look for when buying equipment. It adds up over the month.

Wasabi the J
Jan 23, 2008

About 10 gigs worth of women's butts


Rumors about Nigerian My Little Zebra pornography should be forwarded to:


So I didn't like the results of my power line adapter project, so I returned them and got a discounted Orbi Mini 2 pack. The thing I had was dropping out a lot and my devices would get stuck between the two APs.

I think this has been a much better solution for me, with overall better stability around the house. It's not true "mesh" but I only needed better connectivity on one end of my house, and it has been nice to have the newer bands, so the Orbi kit worked beautifully.

One question; is there a preferred DNS set that you guys like? Are the big easy DNSs like Cloudflare or Google "bad"? How do y'all feel about ad blocking DNSs like AdGuard?

Wasabi the J fucked around with this message at Jun 23, 2018 around 23:38

LRADIKAL
Jun 10, 2001

A Very Useful Person

Fun Shoe

I'm pretty happy with my Pi-Hole. Nice interface, low power, cheap. It uses the google DNS, but I suppose I could use the cloudflare one or whatever. I can get away from using adblockers on my systems here, and it extends to my phones via wi-fi which is nice.

SlowBloke
Aug 14, 2017


KKKLIP ART posted:

So on a purely academic hypothetical, if I wanted to run single mode fiber around my place, what kind of equipment would I need re: switches, adapters, NICs

A point to point link will just require a couple of media converters, a more complex design will require switches with sfp(up to 1gbps speeds) or sfp+(up to 10gbps speeds). Unless you plan to buy 10g nics there is no need for new cards.

Steakandchips
Apr 30, 2009



Any recommendations for DNSs that don't use your data?

SamDabbers
May 26, 2003

QUITE.


Lipstick Apathy

Steakandchips posted:

Any recommendations for DNSs that don't use your data?

Run your own resolver in your network and only configure root hints so it doesn't forward your queries to a third party. DNS is unencrypted so your ISP can still see what you're looking up, but you can at least enforce DNSSEC so they can't intercept and override NXDOMAINs. I like the unbound resolver, and you can stick Pi-Hole in front of it for network-level ad blocking. The downside is the latency hit since you don't get to take advantage of the big hot caches from e.g. Google or Cloudflare.

Evis
Feb 27, 2007
Flying Spaghetti Monster

DNS over HTTPS does actually work.

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004

VTEC
VTEC
VTEC
VTEC
VTEC


So after looking, Infiniband looks like an intriguing <1Gbps networking solution and some of the gear seems really cheap

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

Steakandchips posted:

Any recommendations for DNSs that don't use your data?

CrazyLittle posted:

imho:
1) use your ISP's DNS since it's probably closer to you / less hops and therefore faster at resolving names
2) use google, cloudflare or openDNS, whichever is the least hops away (verify with traceroute)
3) use a dns benchmarking tool to check both round trip latency and actual resolution time to figure out who's the fastest dns server and use the fastest public server in your results.
4) gently caress property and gently caress service providers, they didn't lock it down so I'm gonna use the fastest DNS server that isn't locking me out.

True story - using anycast DNS servers can sometimes send you to servers that are totally out of your region. I've had customers who got redirected halfway across the country because Google DNS had the wrong geo-IP data for their address, and therefore thought they were 1000's of miles away from their real physical space. This meant that regional info was wrong, and overall latency was bad since all the data was backhauling across the country.

There's a whole bunch of posts about this a few pages back. You can follow that discussion starting here: https://forums.somethingawful.com/s...0#post482772522

As for privacy-focused DNS, Cloudflare's 1.1.1.1 and quad-9's 9.9.9.9 are probably your most "honest" options.

SamDabbers posted:

Run your own resolver in your network and only configure root hints so it doesn't forward your queries to a third party. DNS is unencrypted so your ISP can still see what you're looking up, but you can at least enforce DNSSEC so they can't intercept and override NXDOMAINs. I like the unbound resolver, and you can stick Pi-Hole in front of it for network-level ad blocking. The downside is the latency hit since you don't get to take advantage of the big hot caches from e.g. Google or Cloudflare.

CrazyLittle posted:

The "dumb" idea is this idea: "Don't use a forward DNS server - just ask the root hint servers for all DNS queries."

1) You're not an ISP so you won't leverage the economies of scale.
2) Root lookups don't resolve full domain names - only root servers, which then delegate to domain servers who handle host responses.*
3) You'll rarely get a cached response unless it's locally cached so prepare to waste several minutes per day (in aggregate) waiting for websites and everything else to get a DNS response before it even establishes a connection.

CrazyLittle fucked around with this message at Jun 24, 2018 around 19:38

CrazyLittle
Sep 11, 2001







Clapping Larry

Evis posted:

DNS over HTTPS does actually work.
It's also several orders of magnitude slower, so you better run a very generous DNS cache.

KKKLIP ART posted:

So after looking, Infiniband looks like an intriguing <1Gbps networking solution and some of the gear seems really cheap

.... No.

Evis
Feb 27, 2007
Flying Spaghetti Monster

I forgot to mention that just making DNS requests hidden wont hide which servers you’re talking to from your ISP. Server name indication https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Server_Name_Indication is used all over the place. I’d bet you can do some instrumentation on IP addresses to get a pretty good idea of which sites you’re visiting even if they couldn’t see the host name at all.

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004

VTEC
VTEC
VTEC
VTEC
VTEC


CrazyLittle posted:

It's also several orders of magnitude slower, so you better run a very generous DNS cache.


.... No.

That bad

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Takes No Damage
Nov 20, 2004

The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far.


Grimey Drawer

So my parent's router died this weekend. Right now I've got them limping along on an old Linksys I had left over from work, but so far the wireless has died again and the management IP is giving me a HTTP 500 error so I don't trust it to last very much longer.

What's the best offering for a router if their main focus is WiFi range/quality? Is there something that comes bundled together or would I be looking at something like an Edgerouter X + Ubiquiti Unifi AC Lite? I had them running DD-WRT for a good 5 or 6 years prior so I'm pretty comfortable flashing firmware, would the T-Mobile (AC-1900) By ASUS still be a good all-in-one option?

edit: re-reading the OP, it also sounds like the Archer C5/7/9 could work as well. I doubt we'll ever have enough traffic to saturate the C5 hardware, but is there any appreciable difference in wireless coverage between those 3?

Takes No Damage fucked around with this message at Jun 25, 2018 around 02:16

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