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devmd01
Mar 7, 2006

Elektronik
Supersonik


Sneeing Emu posted:

I have what I think is a really simple job of wiring two bedrooms with network jacks, but I'd like some insight/advice/ tips from people who have done it before.

Here's the plan - get up in the attic, run two 75 foot cables (~45ft horizontal run plus ~9 vertical ft on each end) from the modem/network switch to each bedroom. The locations of the drops shown are where the coax drops are now, we don't have a need for those any more, so my plan is to follow those drops down and replace the coax plates with ethernet plates. Is there anything I'm not thinking about, or is it as easy as it is in my head (I know it won't be)? I know I'll have insulation to deal with, and the drops are on exterior walls, but I figure if someone already ran drops with coax, ethernet should be just as easy. Right?.....



Normally iím all for running Ethernet properly but this is a good use case for a MOCA setup to save yourself a bunch of hassle. I assume where your router is is where you have another coax drop in the place.

Do you know if you have fire blocks in your exterior walls? Do you have fiberglass push rods/fish sticks or can borrow some? Do you have a drill with a long enough bit to get through the wall top plates?

Old coax isnít necessarily useless either so donít go ripping it out just yet...plus you may not be able to if it is staples down in some capacity. I was able to re-use some of the existing coax in my house when I installed a huge antenna in the attic for OTA.

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Oysters Autobio
Mar 13, 2017


thiazi posted:

The modem is truly a modem right, it isnít a combo unit that is also doing routing?

What DNS are you using in the router settings?

Do you only have speed issues with internet, or also LAN traffic? (If not this, then you should be able to rule out hardware issue with the new router.)

1- Not sure, the modem is the TP-link TC7650.

2 - Under Dynamic DNS, I have TP-Link selected. My other two options are "NO-IP" and "DynDNS". Below my options it also says "DDNS Unavailable" and says to use DDNS I need to have a TP-Link account.

3 - Not sure what you mean with speed issues on LAN traffic? My speed issues are on the internet when I have an ethernet running from my PC to my router. My other devices on WiFi seem just fine, speed-wise.

RestingB1tchFace
Jul 3, 2016


rufius posted:

Obligatory link to NAS thread - https://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=2801557&perpage=40&noseen=1&pagenumber=650

The main brands that are quite consumer friendly will be Synology and QNAP. Iím partial to QNAP but I think either is a safe bet.

I have only bought devices from the SMB line which is more ďprosumerĒ in nature. I prefer a minimum of 4 drives but if you arenít worried about anything more than basic redundancy (RAID 1) then 2 drives is fine.

I have a TVS-471 and have been very happy with it but those are quite out of date. Modern version of that would be something like TVS-472*. Those run around $1100-$1400 depending on processor and memory without drives.

If youíre looking lower budget, then maybe the TS-451 and friends. Those are in the home and SOHO line and theyíre more like $350-450 range without drives.

Big things to remember with both QNAP and Synology is to make sure you check the drives you want to buy are on their compatible list.

If you have an old computer and some hard drives lying around, a lot of folks like Unraid. Iíve not personally used it but many folks in the NAS thread like it. Itíll allow you to throw a collection of mismatched drives and have it act as a big storage pool. This option requires you purchase a license but itís a good one if you are willing to put in the work to get the drives together and setting up Unraid.

My primary use case for my QNAP is as an intermediate backup location for photos from my phone and for serving Plex. Iíve got nightly and weekly backup jobs for my media. Iím not willing to tolerate a drive failure destroying data so I run a RAID 5.

Youíll have to figure out your needs and tolerances.

EDIT: sorry I forgot Iím not actually in the NAS thread and I wrote this big effort post.

Thanks for the recommendations. Definitely don't need something top of the line. Honestly don't think I have more than a terabyte of stuff to store at this point. I'll check out these brands and the NAS thread.

Sneeing Emu
Dec 5, 2003
Brother, my eyes

devmd01 posted:

Normally iím all for running Ethernet properly but this is a good use case for a MOCA setup to save yourself a bunch of hassle. I assume where your router is is where you have another coax drop in the place.

Do you know if you have fire blocks in your exterior walls? Do you have fiberglass push rods/fish sticks or can borrow some? Do you have a drill with a long enough bit to get through the wall top plates?

Old coax isnít necessarily useless either so donít go ripping it out just yet...plus you may not be able to if it is staples down in some capacity. I was able to re-use some of the existing coax in my house when I installed a huge antenna in the attic for OTA.

Huh, that's the first I've heard of MoCA, that seems... ideal. My modem has a MoCA logo on it, and each drop is already coax. So if my modem is already MoCA enabled, do I just need an adapter at each coax drop in the other two rooms?
That's a really simple solution, thanks for the info, I never would have known that was an option!

Edit: drat, reading online it looks like my provider (Spectrum) disables MoCA on their modems. Trying to enable it from my modem's login page doesn't seem to work, it reverts back to "disabled".

Sneeing Emu fucked around with this message at 02:35 on Jan 19, 2021

movax
Aug 30, 2008



Sneeing Emu posted:

Huh, that's the first I've heard of MoCA, that seems... ideal. My modem has a MoCA logo on it, and each drop is already coax. So if my modem is already MoCA enabled, do I just need an adapter at each coax drop in the other two rooms?
That's a really simple solution, thanks for the info, I never would have known that was an option!

You'll need MoCA adapters ó I use the Actiontec ones right now while I slowly run cables where I need them to go. IIRC they operate on Band D, which sidesteps other MoCA devices you might have and will stay out of the way of CATV frequencies. You'll need one at each location you want to go from coax to Ethernet, and you can have many on the same coax network. What I did in my place, since I don't care for TV service, is pick the two coax runs I needed to get network connectivity too, and run them to a 1:2 splitter in my garage that is rated for the full MoCA frequency bandwidth. Attached a single Actiontec to the input of that splitter, and then one at each endpoint. Passes VLANs and is basically invisible to the rest of the network.

"MoCA-enabled" on the modem is interesting ó mine isn't (I assume) but I guess that's for setups where you have MoCA injected prior to the coax feed to the modem?

thiazi
Sep 27, 2002


Oysters Autobio posted:

1- Not sure, the modem is the TP-link TC7650.

2 - Under Dynamic DNS, I have TP-Link selected. My other two options are "NO-IP" and "DynDNS". Below my options it also says "DDNS Unavailable" and says to use DDNS I need to have a TP-Link account.

3 - Not sure what you mean with speed issues on LAN traffic? My speed issues are on the internet when I have an ethernet running from my PC to my router. My other devices on WiFi seem just fine, speed-wise.

The point about LAN traffic is to simply help confirm if it is a router hardware issue (unlikely) or configuration (probably) to the internet. If you can test the LAN speed by doing a wired computer-to-computer file transfer through the routerís LAN switch ports, it should be blazingly fast and will confirm your router is handling the gigabit switching, in which case you need to diagnose configuration.


DNS meaning the DNS server address(es) you have configured, not dynamic DNS. I doubt this would be the issue, but Iím getting out of my troubleshooting depth. Perhaps a factory reset/updating firmware on the new router would be in order.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Hey, sorry if this is a stupid question but I read the OP and didn't see anything specifically addressing it so hopefully this is the right place.

I have a 2 storey home and my router is in the basement, so it's 2 floors away and opposite end of the house which leads to a very weak wireless signal.

HOWEVER

I do have FTTH and hardwired Cat5e in each room, including unused ones in the bedrooms/area of the house where the wireless signal is weak from the basement.

Is there a way I can use a repeater (or something simple?) to plug into my an unused hardwired RJ45 outlet and broadcast a wireless signal from that it so I get a nice signal on the upper floor?

I don't need it to be the full gigabit connection obviously, just something strong enough so I can get a reliable signal that doesn't suck.

My looking at repeaters/boosters don't seem to quite work like that... but I am obviously not a networking guy by a long shot.

Any recommendations would be appreciated, and genuinely sorry if something like this has been addressed I just didn't see anything.

e: Do they make something like a basic wireless network hub/switch that has no routing ability?

slidebite fucked around with this message at 05:04 on Jan 20, 2021

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



slidebite posted:

Hey, sorry if this is a stupid question but I read the OP and didn't see anything specifically addressing it so hopefully this is the right place.

I have a 2 storey home and my router is in the basement, so it's 2 floors away and opposite end of the house which leads to a very weak wireless signal.

HOWEVER

I do have FTTH and hardwired Cat5e in each room, including unused ones in the bedrooms/area of the house where the wireless signal is weak from the basement.

Is there a way I can use a repeater (or something simple?) to plug into my an unused hardwired RJ45 outlet and broadcast a wireless signal from that it so I get a nice signal on the upper floor?

I don't need it to be the full gigabit connection obviously, just something strong enough so I can get a reliable signal that doesn't suck.

My looking at repeaters/boosters don't seem to quite work like that... but I am obviously not a networking guy by a long shot.

Any recommendations would be appreciated, and genuinely sorry if something like this has been addressed I just didn't see anything.

e: Do they make something like a basic wireless network hub/switch that has no routing ability?

You want what's called a wireless access point. Repeaters or bridges aren't quite the right thing. The thread is pretty fond of the Ubiquiti unifi WAPs. You may only need one but possibly two depending on the size of your house. I'm fond of the Ubiquiti UniFi AC Lite for being like $70-80 and good quality. The NanoHD is also good. If you have crazy thick walls or something they make some "one in each room" style ones but it's likely overkill for your situation.

edit: there are other options like a wireless mesh system where the nodes go around your house and use wireless signals between them to send the data back to the base unit, but with wires in your walls already just a WAP or two should be more than enough. Ubiquiti stuff can have a whole ecosystem of devices including a router, switches, controller, access points that work within their software, but you don't need all of that unless you really want it. You can configure a single WAP and it'll just sit there turning wifi into ethernet traffic and vice versa.

Typically you want to just match the 2.4ghz settings (SSID and password) of your other access point (the wifi your router has built in) except put the 2.4ghz stuff on a different channel so that your devices can hop between them as you walk around. 2.4ghz stuff should be put on channel 1, 6, or 11 to prevent overlap and you can use a wifi analyzer app on your smartphone to make sure you pick the ones with the least interference from neighbors.

Rexxed fucked around with this message at 05:38 on Jan 20, 2021

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Thank you so much - I have heard of those and makes sense. I'll do some research on them. Appreciate it

Sneeing Emu
Dec 5, 2003
Brother, my eyes

movax posted:

You'll need MoCA adapters ó I use the Actiontec ones right now while I slowly run cables where I need them to go. IIRC they operate on Band D, which sidesteps other MoCA devices you might have and will stay out of the way of CATV frequencies. You'll need one at each location you want to go from coax to Ethernet, and you can have many on the same coax network. What I did in my place, since I don't care for TV service, is pick the two coax runs I needed to get network connectivity too, and run them to a 1:2 splitter in my garage that is rated for the full MoCA frequency bandwidth. Attached a single Actiontec to the input of that splitter, and then one at each endpoint. Passes VLANs and is basically invisible to the rest of the network.

"MoCA-enabled" on the modem is interesting ó mine isn't (I assume) but I guess that's for setups where you have MoCA injected prior to the coax feed to the modem?

Ok, MoCA adapters arrived today (Actiontec ECB6250), I tried setting them up, but I'm not getting a coax connection light on either end. Here is how I set it up, according to the manual:





We only have internet service, so I have no need for the splitter going to the TVs in the manual, I connected the adapters straight from the wall to the adapter. I tested the adapters by connecting them to each other with coax and the light turned green, just not when I connected them to the wall coax connectors.

This may be a separate issue, but I wasn't able to enable my MoCA connection in my modem's settings (this is only if I want to use my modem as the MoCA adapter, right?):


I'm a real big dummy when it comes to this stuff, but I don't think I did anything drastically wrong, did I?

FunOne
Aug 20, 2000
I am a slimey vat of concentrated stupidity



Fun Shoe

Is it new construction? Sometimes they don't install a splitter and just leave the ends bare somewhere.

movax
Aug 30, 2008



Sneeing Emu posted:

Ok, MoCA adapters arrived today (Actiontec ECB6250), I tried setting them up, but I'm not getting a coax connection light on either end. Here is how I set it up, according to the manual:





We only have internet service, so I have no need for the splitter going to the TVs in the manual, I connected the adapters straight from the wall to the adapter. I tested the adapters by connecting them to each other with coax and the light turned green, just not when I connected them to the wall coax connectors.

This may be a separate issue, but I wasn't able to enable my MoCA connection in my modem's settings (this is only if I want to use my modem as the MoCA adapter, right?):


I'm a real big dummy when it comes to this stuff, but I don't think I did anything drastically wrong, did I?

Were all the coax in your place run to a single splitter / distro amp in your basement? If so, do you have a model number / know what the bandwidth of it was?

If you do, and you can find the two runs in question and direct connect them, does it work?

Sneeing Emu
Dec 5, 2003
Brother, my eyes

FunOne posted:

Is it new construction? Sometimes they don't install a splitter and just leave the ends bare somewhere.

No it was built in the 80s. We actually had someone from the cable company come out and test all of the connections recently, and he verified that they all worked. I may have to get them to come back out and verify that they're connected to the same splitter.

Sneeing Emu fucked around with this message at 04:14 on Jan 21, 2021

Sneeing Emu
Dec 5, 2003
Brother, my eyes

movax posted:

Were all the coax in your place run to a single splitter / distro amp in your basement? If so, do you have a model number / know what the bandwidth of it was?

If you do, and you can find the two runs in question and direct connect them, does it work?

That's something I'll have to check. We had some damage from a house fire next door last year, on the side of the house where the incoming service is, but that was all repaired and they tested the service in each room afterwards.

fletcher
Jun 27, 2003

ken park is my favorite movie

Cybernetic Crumb

Sneeing Emu posted:

No it was built in the 80s. We actually had someone from the cable company come out and test all of the connections recently, and he verified that they all worked. I may have to get them to come back out and verify that they're connected to the same splitter.

Sometimes they will leave them disconnected if you are not using that connection. Might be able to save yourself some hassle and pop open the panel outside or wherever it is and see if any are disconnected.

Space Gopher
Jul 31, 2006
BLITHERING IDIOT

Sneeing Emu posted:

No it was built in the 80s. We actually had someone from the cable company come out and test all of the connections recently, and he verified that they all worked. I may have to get them to come back out and verify that they're connected to the same splitter.

Can you get a look at the splitter itself? Look for bandwidth ratings, or failing that, a manufacturer name and model number. MoCA runs at pretty high frequencies that arenít usually used for TV (>1000 MHz). An older splitter might be trashing the signal.

Also, if you have a bunch of drops throughout the house, they might have you on a distribution amplifier. Modern amplifiers will pass a passive upstream signal back to the cable company, so cable modems and boxes work, but they wonít let downstream devices talk to each other. This would be easy to identify: your ďsplitterĒ would have an active power connection.

slidebite
Nov 6, 2005

Good egg


Question re wall mount wireless access points.

Are the antennas on them omnidirectional in general?

devmd01
Mar 7, 2006

Elektronik
Supersonik


Just switched from pfsense VM to an ER-X. I wanted to go back to a hardware appliance so I could move my esxi host elsewhere. Pretty happy with it so far, it has more than enough knobs to tweak but itís pretty drat easy to do so.

movax
Aug 30, 2008



slidebite posted:

Question re wall mount wireless access points.

Are the antennas on them omnidirectional in general?

It would be amazing if actually physically possible but most will have some element of directionality to them. Here are the UAP radiation patterns as an example; you can see the ceiling / wall-mount guys are designed to focus energy in one direction and have very little gain "behind" them.

Sneeing Emu
Dec 5, 2003
Brother, my eyes

Space Gopher posted:

Can you get a look at the splitter itself? Look for bandwidth ratings, or failing that, a manufacturer name and model number. MoCA runs at pretty high frequencies that aren’t usually used for TV (>1000 MHz). An older splitter might be trashing the signal.

Also, if you have a bunch of drops throughout the house, they might have you on a distribution amplifier. Modern amplifiers will pass a passive upstream signal back to the cable company, so cable modems and boxes work, but they won’t let downstream devices talk to each other. This would be easy to identify: your “splitter” would have an active power connection.

Well the splitter isn't even in the box outside, which means it must be up in the attic somewhere. At this point I think just going with my original plan of running additional ethernet cables might be easier.

Meow Meow Meow
Nov 13, 2010


Hi all, the wifi signal in my master bedroom is on the weak side. I have an ethernet port in the bedroom wired up to my router via a switch. I want a device that I can plug into the ethernet port and have a better wifi signal in my room for my phone etc. Ideally I'd like it to carry the same signal as my wifi router and not have to log into a new wireless network every time Im in my room. It sounds like an access point is what Im looking for based on reading the OP? Are the ones in the OP still recommended getting? Or should I be looking at something else?

anthropogentric
Sep 7, 2000
Forum Veteran

Moving into a new construction home soon, and I'm trying to build out my network diagram and planning. I was able to go through the house and run 2x Cat 6a lines to each room in the home to a central area in the basement where I'm going to put up a rack with a switch, NAS, etc. I will have synchronous gigabit networking through Google Fiber.



I'm trying to plan out the router to use, and I'm stuck between getting a Ubiquiti (either ER-X, ER-Lite, or ER-4) or building a pfsense box. I have at least a quad core Haswell machine I could use as a pfsense, and could use a R5 3600 machine if needed as well, just add a dual port NIC. I don't have experience with either system, but part of this would also be a learning experience for future tinkering and network build out. I think either setup would for the routing speed I need - I do very little in a VPN system that I wouldn't be routing through it the majority of the time. I would be interested in starting to build out QoS though.

For the Ubiquiti routers, I think the ER-X would be enough hardware for what I'm doing, but I'm wondering if I would want to upgrade to an ER-4 eventually anyway and just get it from the beginning? The pfsense route would let me replace the PiHole I'm currently using for DNS filtering as well, though.

One other consideration - there will be a TV with a short HDMI run through the wall to the homelab room that I may occasionally need a Win10 VM. I was planning on occasionally running a VM on the freeNAS box (freeNAS running on the metal and overprovisioning hardware for it), but a pfsense box with reasonable hardware (i5-4590) might work better?

Any other issues with the network? The 10GBaseT run for the workstation is mostly just going to be for playing around - I don't "need" it, but it would be nice. I deal with some large data sets and having to copy them over to the local machine for Access/Sql/SAS is not a huge burden, but something I wouldn't complain about missing.

Happy Pizza Guy
Jun 24, 2004

"Yeah, it was incredible, the drugs, the sex, the all-night parties. I really miss that Shining Time Station."

Grimey Drawer

I'm moving into a new apartment that's already wired for FiOS. Since I'm not using their television service, I'd like to bring my own router.

My partner and I are pretty much 100% in the Apple ecosystem and I already have the last Airport Extreme Base Station from 2013 (yikes!). Since it's a pretty small space (1 bedroom/750 sq. feet) would I be missing much from more modern routers? Is there any reason why it wouldn't work with FiOS if I connect it directly to the ONT with gigabit?

DrDork
Dec 29, 2003
commanding officer of the Army of Dorkness

If the 2013 one you got is the one with 802.11ac, then it's still decent. Obviously not as fast as newer "Wifi 6" 802.11ax ones, but it's really not necessary for a small place and low bandwidth devices like phones or iPads. IIRC the only actual Mac laptops that support 802.11ax are the new M1-based ones.

There's always an open question of how much Apple has bothered to keep up their security patching on a device that old, though. While I'd give Apple a lot more benefit of the doubt than most companies about it, 7 years old is a long time for a router. Looks like there was at least an update sometime last summer for some critical vulnerabilities, so do be sure you've gotten whatever the most recent firmware is.

For actually using it with FiOS (I assume from Verizon?) it should be pretty trivial. The ONTs spit out a normal ethernet connection via RJ45, so just plug that guy in and go. At most, if they insist on providing you a router, you might have to log into it once to grab the MAC address and then have your Airport use that MAC for its WAN. But that's just a few clicks, and usually isn't needed if you can convince them to let you use your router from the start.

Happy Pizza Guy
Jun 24, 2004

"Yeah, it was incredible, the drugs, the sex, the all-night parties. I really miss that Shining Time Station."

Grimey Drawer

DrDork posted:

If the 2013 one you got is the one with 802.11ac, then it's still decent. Obviously not as fast as newer "Wifi 6" 802.11ax ones, but it's really not necessary for a small place and low bandwidth devices like phones or iPads. IIRC the only actual Mac laptops that support 802.11ax are the new M1-based ones.

There's always an open question of how much Apple has bothered to keep up their security patching on a device that old, though. While I'd give Apple a lot more benefit of the doubt than most companies about it, 7 years old is a long time for a router. Looks like there was at least an update sometime last summer for some critical vulnerabilities, so do be sure you've gotten whatever the most recent firmware is.

For actually using it with FiOS (I assume from Verizon?) it should be pretty trivial. The ONTs spit out a normal ethernet connection via RJ45, so just plug that guy in and go. At most, if they insist on providing you a router, you might have to log into it once to grab the MAC address and then have your Airport use that MAC for its WAN. But that's just a few clicks, and usually isn't needed if you can convince them to let you use your router from the start.

Thanks! It is the 802.11ac version. I'll give it a shot and if it doesn't work out I'll move up to a more recent router.

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade




All pre-M1 Macs and iOS devices older than the iPhone 11 are 802.11ac at best, and that includes 2020 Intel Macs.

Getting an 802.11ax router will future proof your network, but none of your Apple equipment will really take advantage of it unless you have the latest and greatest.

Running Airport Utility from macOS or your iOS devices will tell you instantly if there is any firmware update your AEBS 802.11ac (it's the mini-tower format right?) requires.

You'd plug one end of an Ethernet cable into the FIOS ONT and the other end in the AEBS WAN port (the one at the bottom with the little flower-like icon.)

I thought I was hitting the upper limits of the AEBS (I have a lot of IOT devices) as I was starting to get dropped connections, but all I had to do was offload the routing to an ER-X for less than 60 bucks and leave the AEBS in bridge mode, and things are faster than ever and haven't skipped a beat across all my online devices.

namlosh
Feb 11, 2014

I blew up


So, I have a couple of questions I hope you guys can help me with regarding adding a VPN to my home network:

I have a UDM-PRO and am using tons of vlans to separate everything.

Like I have an:
ADMIN vlan for servers/switches and such
Privileged network that's distinct but also has access to everything
Normal network that can talk to everything but privileged
iOT network that can get to the internet, but nothing else
nOT network that can't get to anything but an internal NTP server/port

Everything is controlled via Firewall rules in the UDM-PRO

I'd like to add a wireguard vpn. I have a bunch of Pi's so I figure I'll use one of those and "PiVPN". I even grabbed a USB3.0 ethernet card in case I need to have 2 NICs in the pi.

I guess my question has to do with how best to set this up in the UDM-PRO. Should I create a VPN vlan and put the pi on both the "admin" vlan and it's other interface on the new VPN vlan?
Does the VPN hand out dhcp addresses to the clients or should the UDM? Should I then be able to control access to and from the VPN vlan using firewall rules if I need to?

Do I need to add a route for just the port (tcp/51820) that wireguard uses to the DHCP reservation I'll set up on the PiVPN's Admin vlan interface?

As far as public IP address goes, I've noticed that mine doesn't change often. I don't need to use dynamic DNS as long as I'm ok with suddenly being unable to connect if my IP changes right?

Also, as it relates to SSL and such, I'm another person who's created a wildcard cert from Let's Encrypt using their certbot acme-challenge DNS TXT file and it works great. Not sure how I could automate it though. If someone has any idea let me know.
I'm using this statement interactively right now:
code:
./certbot-auto certonly --manual --preferred-challenges=dns --email me@domainname.com --server https://acme-v02.api.letsencrypt.org/directory --agree-tos -d *.domainname.com

namlosh fucked around with this message at 03:44 on Jan 23, 2021

rufius
Feb 27, 2011

Clear alcohols are for rich women on diets.


Binary Badger posted:



You'd plug one end of an Ethernet cable into the FIOS ONT and the other end in the AEBS WAN port (the one at the bottom with the little flower-like icon.)



One important thing is the AEBS doesnít do VLAN tagging. So if theyíre doing that, you need something like an ER-X acting as the router and put the AEBS in bridge mode.

Century Link uses VLAN tag 201 for example.

Jam2
Jan 15, 2008

With Energy For Mayhem


hooah posted:

I just did exactly this. I used this guide and it worked pretty well. The wifi radios on the BGW didn't turn off as expected, so I had to follow this thread on the AT&T forums.


Edit for my own stuff:
Evidently I didn't quite get the right equipment. I thought the USW Flex Mini distributed PoE, but it can just be powered by it. So the in-wall AP I bought for my office wouldn't work. I just ordered a Switch Lite 8 to replace it with. Unfortunately it seems that Ubiquiti doesn't do returns? At least it was only $30...

Turris Omnia migration complete, but not all desired features are functional.

I am trying to basically have the same SSID offer 2.4/5 Ghz and have clients connected to whichever they are able to connect to.

No luck.

Tried enabling 802.11r thinking that this might be what I want. My basic research indicates these features relate to band steering, but unclear the precise distinctions.

So far the 2.4/5 radio is nonfunctional. The 2.4 radio is taking all traffic.

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



I'm looking to eventually replace my current Unifi AC Lites. I have an M1 MBP on order, we have a Firestick 4K, an older Macbook Air, switch, a dell XPS13 of an older vintage, a Switch, and 2 iPhone XSs. I'd like something with Wifi6 or 6E, but it looks like 6e doesn't really have any benefit for us. I use a USG3 for my router, we have 600mbit internet. Also considering getting a POE switch of some sort to make life easier.

Rexxed
May 1, 2010

Dis is amazing!
I gotta try dis!



KKKLIP ART posted:

I'm looking to eventually replace my current Unifi AC Lites. I have an M1 MBP on order, we have a Firestick 4K, an older Macbook Air, switch, a dell XPS13 of an older vintage, a Switch, and 2 iPhone XSs. I'd like something with Wifi6 or 6E, but it looks like 6e doesn't really have any benefit for us. I use a USG3 for my router, we have 600mbit internet. Also considering getting a POE switch of some sort to make life easier.

I haven't read anything bad or good about them but the UniFi 6 Lite Access Point is $99.
https://store.ui.com/collections/unifi-network-access-points/products/unifi-ap-6-lite

smax
Nov 9, 2009



KKKLIP ART posted:

I'm looking to eventually replace my current Unifi AC Lites. I have an M1 MBP on order, we have a Firestick 4K, an older Macbook Air, switch, a dell XPS13 of an older vintage, a Switch, and 2 iPhone XSs. I'd like something with Wifi6 or 6E, but it looks like 6e doesn't really have any benefit for us. I use a USG3 for my router, we have 600mbit internet. Also considering getting a POE switch of some sort to make life easier.

Ubiquiti has UniFi 6 APs out now. The U6 Lite was just mentioned, but the U6-LR is significantly better IMO. It has 4 radios on each band, enabling much faster speeds even on older non-ax devices. I just replaced 2 UAP-AC-LRs with U6-LRs today and it doubled my wireless network speeds (for reference the UAP-AC-Lite has 2 radios for each band, the UAP-AC-LR has 3 2.4GHz and 2 5 GHz radios).

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



I kinda think I want to do the LRs. Need to sort POE because I donít know if my current POE injectors for the old Lites will work.

smax
Nov 9, 2009



KKKLIP ART posted:

I kinda think I want to do the LRs. Need to sort POE because I donít know if my current POE injectors for the old Lites will work.

They wonít, the U6 line requires PoE+ (at) power.

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



smax posted:

They wonít, the U6 line requires PoE+ (at) power.

OK, so I am looking at 2 APs and at least a Unifi Switch PoE 8 or Switch Lite PoE, both seem to support the AT PoE standard. Good to know.

smax
Nov 9, 2009



KKKLIP ART posted:

OK, so I am looking at 2 APs and at least a Unifi Switch PoE 8 or Switch Lite PoE, both seem to support the AT PoE standard. Good to know.

You can also buy AT injectors or a third party AT switch, keeping it in the UniFi family does have its benefits though. Mine are on a USW-8-150W.

Example of a cheap but highly rated injector: https://www.amazon.com/Cudy-Gigabit-Injector-1000Mbps-Compliant/dp/B07TQFVG2L/

KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



I'll bookmark that just in case. I have POE injectors now. Eventual plan is to get like, a 6u or 8u wall mounted network rack when we redo our basement and I just hate the extra cables. Might be a good stopgap until then though!

KS
Jun 10, 2003


Outrageous Lumpwad

smax posted:

Ubiquiti has UniFi 6 APs out now. The U6 Lite was just mentioned, but the U6-LR is significantly better IMO. It has 4 radios on each band, enabling much faster speeds even on older non-ax devices. I just replaced 2 UAP-AC-LRs with U6-LRs today and it doubled my wireless network speeds (for reference the UAP-AC-Lite has 2 radios for each band, the UAP-AC-LR has 3 2.4GHz and 2 5 GHz radios).

OK, that's a comical number of radios -- I had to look it up as I was envisioning budget cell phones with like 8 cameras.

MU-MIMO != radios. That's a single radio with multiple antennas for spatial streams. There are no 4x4 WiFi 6 clients I'm aware of, so the only way to take advantage of the -LR is in dense environments with multiple high speed clients (and they can't be in the same area due to how beamforming works). I'd suggest that's not worth the additional $$$ for home use.

You'd also need a mgig physical network to push a 4x4 AP, and the U6-LR just has a gbit port.

KS fucked around with this message at 19:30 on Jan 24, 2021

smax
Nov 9, 2009



KS posted:

OK, that's a comical number of radios -- I had to look it up as I was envisioning budget cell phones with like 8 cameras.

MU-MIMO != radios. That's a single radio with multiple antennas for spatial streams. There are no 4x4 WiFi 6 clients I'm aware of, so the only way to take advantage of the -LR is in dense environments with multiple high speed clients (and they can't be in the same area due to how beamforming works). I'd suggest that's not worth the additional $$$ for home use.

You'd also need a mgig physical network to push a 4x4 AP, and the U6-LR just has a gbit port.

You're right, my terminology sucks. Regardless, I did still see significant real-world performance increases on 802.11ac devices by upgrading. The UniFi AC Lite and LR weren't really known for high real-world throughputs, in my case the U6-LR allows me to use a lot more of my gigabit internet.

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KKKLIP ART
Sep 3, 2004



Yeah it kinda stinks that seemingly no AP has a 2.5GB port or at least negotiates at a 10gb link. The extra speed is nice but if you canít use it because the physics port...

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