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Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

I was never sure whether or not this was purely necessary, but when I used to be out and about grabbing wifi when I could, I would VPN into my home network with the highest security settings available and do my banking through that. Now I just tether my phone. I hope Sprint isn't stealing my banking info

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Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Sano posted:

I've been using my WRT54G for around 6 years now. I've been playing online video games for the PS2/PS3/360 in my basement (2 floors down separated from the router) and used to be a really good host when hosting game rooms. I've also been using it to browse with my laptop and it's worked well with it anywhere within the basement.

But recently I had to renovate my entire basement to fit a Gaming Rig I had built about a week ago. Because of the renovation I had made, my Xbox 360 is now a few steps further away from the router, and it was just enough to cause little to no connection between it and the router. The PC computer was not having much luck connecting to it either.

I asked a friend for a solution and he had suggested a repeater, so I got one of these... http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...82E16833124430.
Setting it up was easy and I've connected to the router just fine with both the Xbox and Computer thanks to it.

But recently I've noticed the large amounts of lag in my video games like Halo reach, and I've become the worst host in any game. The connection tends to even drop at least once a night for both my computer and my Xbox.

For this week, Onlive (A cloud based gaming service) is giving everyone in the US any game in their catalog for just 1 dollar. So I launched their application and it has confirmed to me that my connection just downright sucks.



Is there any kind of solution anyone here can recommend? Was this repeater a waste of money?
That link doesn't work.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Sano posted:

I've been using my WRT54G for around 6 years now. I've been playing online video games for the PS2/PS3/360 in my basement (2 floors down separated from the router) and used to be a really good host when hosting game rooms. I've also been using it to browse with my laptop and it's worked well with it anywhere within the basement.

But recently I had to renovate my entire basement to fit a Gaming Rig I had built about a week ago. Because of the renovation I had made, my Xbox 360 is now a few steps further away from the router, and it was just enough to cause little to no connection between it and the router. The PC computer was not having much luck connecting to it either.

I asked a friend for a solution and he had suggested a repeater, so I got one of these... http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...N82E16833124430
Setting it up was easy and I've connected to the router just fine with both the Xbox and Computer thanks to it.

But recently I've noticed the large amounts of lag in my video games like Halo reach, and I've become the worst host in any game. The connection tends to even drop at least once a night for both my computer and my Xbox.

For this week, Onlive (A cloud based gaming service) is giving everyone in the US any game in their catalog for just 1 dollar. So I launched their application and it has confirmed to me that my connection just downright sucks.



Is there any kind of solution anyone here can recommend? Was this repeater a waste of money?

Does your repeater have a Clinton mode and an Ethernet port. The only suggestion I gave to troubleshooting the problem is to turn it onto client mode somewhere you get decent signal, then run a cord to your gaming devices, and seeing if it still is unacceptable.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Whoops typo & auto correct; client mode. That isn't a permanent fix, obviously, just trying to troubleshooting your issue.

If you're not wanting to see if you can get it to work, you could always just buy bigger antennas for your wrt

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Sano posted:

do bigger antenna attachments actually work? Seems cheaper then buying a whole new router.

how do I know which antenna to get?

I'd just jump on eBay and either get the official Linksys antenna upgrade (Linksys HGA7T 7DBi TNC Antenna Kit + Bracket) or try your luck with the generic 9DBi kit for a little less. Looks like the linksys one is ~18 shipped, generic ~10 shipped.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Goodpancakes posted:

We have a nice lab setup in the basement of a University building with several computers and a printer all plugged into the University network. The problem is that anyone in the building can access the printer without being in the lab. The result is that we run through a TON of toner due to people jacking the printer and printing stuff from somewhere else in the building. Is there a solution to this particular problem?

What model printer?

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

devmd01 posted:

its me, im the lovely neighbor. Ubiquiti AP at the peak of my attic...haven't done a proper site survey, but let's just say that streaming pandora over wifi-only on my blackberry in every corner of my yard works just fine.
Wireless n router on channel 1, g router on channel 11, guest router on channel 6. To hell with the neighborhood.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Walked posted:



I hate my apartment complex. I am AIRPLANESYEAH

Going to pick up a 5ghz router (switched to channel 1 after seeing this graph, and seems to be an improvement).

Sigh.

Virginia Girl is a giant rear end in a top hat.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Jimlad posted:

ok, I gave that a go. The modem said it was connected, Tomato on the router said it was connected, but nothing worked; I couldn't access anything on the internet and couldn't get to the modem's setup page without wiring to it directly.

Did you power cycle both the modem and the router afterwards? Any time you connect a new device directly to a modem you have to do a power cycle on both devices.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Pogue_Mahone posted:

Okay guys, I have finially got Broadband in my new house, rather than using my mobile broadband dongle. It is all working great on my girlfriends laptop, using her wireless card. On my home build desktop however, it's a different story. I am using a wired connection with the integrated Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller. I couldn't get a connection at all for ages, with Windows 7 not recognising an ethernet cable being connected. I reinstalled the drivers and then it started working, great! 30 minutes later it completely died again. Then whenever I do manage to get Windows to recognise a cable connected, it hangs on identifying network. Also of note is when the cable isn't recognised, the LED on the socket is not on either, despite the cable definately being connected correctly.

By changing the device setting for "Speed and Duplex" to 100mbps/Half Duplex it seems to be staying connected, I was wondering if that is going to be a good enough fix or should I be wanting the setting to go back onto auto-negotiation?

If it messes up again I think I might just have to go out and get myself a wireless adaptor.

That sounds like a bad cable. Possibly a bad port on the router or your ethernet device, but I'm betting cable.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

DocCynical posted:

Should I just get a new WRT54GS or WRT54GL or get a fancy pants one?

Hey buddy, I'm pretty sure the WRT54GL is a recommended router in the OP.

OP posted:

I don't need the speeds of N, help me find a G only router
Any half decent G router (say, the WRT54GL), is going to be overpriced on a spec by spec comparison to an N router. For $50 you can get a GL, or for $40, you can get an N router with a faster processor, and double the ram. You can just turn N off if you're not going to use it.
Oh.


Is wireless not working at all, or are you able to see the network, and it just doesn't connect?

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Doctor Party posted:

Ok so I downloaded that program and ran it. It looks like there are 18 routers available. Mine has 40% signal strength and 20% noise. It is running on the same frequency as 12 others.

Changed the channel to one no one else is using. I guess I will give this some time to see if this helped. If not I may be back to ask for advice on what router to buy.

Thanks guys.

Keep in mind that unless the channel you picked is 1, 6, or 11 you're still going to get interference, because each channel bleeds into those surrounding it. If you have 5 routers on each channels 1/6/11, and you pick channel 3 because its 'empty', you're actually going to be getting interference from the routers on channel 1 AND channel 6.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Binary Badger posted:

"SpeedBooster" is a term used on Linksys routers that had a certain set of 802.11g Broadcom based chipsets. If your desktop/laptop also used Linksys Broadcom based chipsets intended to be SpeedBooster compatible, they'd work at an effective 125 Mbits/sec using some proprietary compression schemes, depending on whether or not you have a lot of easily compressible data in your stream.

Atheros has different buzzwords for its compression schemes, like Super-G or Super-AG.

In fact, you can use this to identify what chipset is being used in the card / router.

tl;dr: it's still a lovely buzzword, especially if you know you're using a different chipset in your desktop/laptop.

The Linksys WRT54GS with Speedboost does have the distinction of having the most RAM of the WRT54g series (32mb of ram, 8mb rom; double what the GL had; why do people pay more for the GL? )

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

For another five hours or so, there's a DD-WRT compatible router on sale for $25 shipped. Dual band router, but you can only run N on one band or the other. (You'd have an N network on 5ghz, but a G network on 2.4ghz). Still, for $25, it seems pretty good to me.
http://1saleaday.com/

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Thoom posted:

I have a gigabit fiber connection and the Cisco TES301-NA router that Google provided seems to be woefully inadequate for its job. Every day or so it goes completely catatonic and needs to be rebooted. This is probably not a hardware defect, because I exchanged it and the new one does the exact same thing. So I'm in the market for a new wired router. My requirements:

  • Gigabit WAN throughput.
  • Doesn't poo poo the bed on a regular basis
  • Port forwarding
  • Straightforward administration (preferably web-based)

Nice-to-haves:

  • VPN support
  • Multi-WAN. I've got an old DSL connection I'd like to use as a backup that also has a block of 12 static IPs that are useful because they're associated with Stanford University and give access to Stanford's various scientific journal subscriptions. I have spare server hardware that could run a VPN on this connection, so it's not super critical.

My budget target is $100-600. Any suggestions?

I looked at pfsense, but it claims I'd need incredibly expensive/powerful hardware (3.0GHz+ server class CPU) to do gigabit throughput, which seems a little odd since my current router is tiny, probably runs some embedded ARM or PPC CPU, and does a gigabit just fine other than the periodic crashes. Is pfsense just poorly optimized or feature bloated or something?

Probably a Mikrotik or the like would be good for this.
A goon is selling a higher end one here:
http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...hreadid=3446462
They sell other versions in various price ranges.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

My cable company got rid of my speed class a while back, and has now decided that they're bumping legacy customers either up or down to the new tiers. I enjoyed my current speed, so after half an hour on the phone talking to everybody that would listen, I got them to bump my tier up without charging me the current rate, so I now have an additional 3mbps downlink that I don't really need. I'd like to set up a public wifi for my immediate surrounding neighbors, basically limited to that 3mbps (though I probably will QOS it instead of hard limits).

My only requirement is that I want to set up a start page that every new client is redirected to, like they do in most restaurants. I don't need logins or anything, but I do want to be able to create a page that has information (like, "Hey, slackers, this is free wifi provided by Joe Blow, don't mess things up!"), and anything else I want to throw up. Can DD-WRT do this? I'd prefer to have one dedicated router just for this, serving wifi and the webpage with no additional hardware.

I'd prefer this setup vs talking to my neighbors because a few houses around me are populated by students that come and go frequently, so new arrivals are very common.

EDIT: I'd also like to be able to do this on a WRT-54GL, because its not being used, and I have huge rear end antennas for it.

Triikan fucked around with this message at 22:36 on Nov 16, 2011

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Chortles posted:

As my D-Link DIR-601's apparently died, I'm looking at the EDIMAX BR-6228Ns. Yea or nay at ~$20?

Also, by "late model Linksys WRT54G devices with gimped memory," did the OP mean the WRT54GL specifically?

The WRT-54GL is actually a reissue of the older models before they humped the memory. It's also still $50, which is ridiculous. Get a modern router for the same price with better specs.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Agreed posted:

Question, since I'm coming from a router that to my knowledge did not offer gigabit, it is logically unlikely for there to be a reduction in performance across my LAN when, e.g., transcoding with PS3MS or PlayOn, right? I am pretty sure I've seen utilization get up to 20mbits with very high quality settings, and with high-quality MKVs more like 50-60mbits... But that's fine, well within specifications, right?

Also, I picked up a bunch of wireless N USB adapters. Would I be better off going with Wireless N than with 100megabit LAN?

I love that this router has dual band and will run g devices and n devices simultaneously, it's... just a really great router and it was like $30 at Woot. Its QoS is killer, I can really precisely divvy up the bandwidth, and the quality of its hardware is so much nicer than my previous router. I'm actually getting quicker loading times for pages just browsing. That's freaky. My old router must have been pretty crap0.

Should I be at all concerned that the Netgear router doesn't take DD-WRT? I haven't read about any security vulnerabilities and the first thing it did when it hopped online was immediately check for newer firmware so clearly Netgear is pretty conscious of that compared to my older Linksys units. But then again DD-WRT was actually necessary to do half the stuff that the Netgear firmware takes care of, so...

The thing you have to realize is, assuming you're using wide band on Wireless N (40mhz), and are getting the full ideal 300mbps, that's not duplex, so its effectively 150mbps each way (definitely oversimplifying, put down the pitchforks), and wired connections are going to have less latency because of how wireless works. The wired connection will be more reliable.

If you get acceptable performance over wireless, I wouldn't mess with it, but wired is preferable over wireless with all other things being equal. Remember, if you want gigabit, you can always get a separate switch, and all your wired devices will talk to each other at gigabit speeds. (You wireless devices talking to your gigabit devices will still be limited by the 100mbps connection, though).

DD-WRT is great because of the features not common in consumer based routers. On many devices it also makes them much more reliable. I'd say that the reliability of current routers on stock firmwares has come a great way since the mid 00s, so I wouldn't worry about not having DD-WRT unless you start wanting to do things not supported by your firmware.

Triikan fucked around with this message at 19:59 on Nov 18, 2011

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

WastedJoker posted:

Thanks but I've settled on this:

http://www.lambda-tek.com/WBMR-HP-G...ex-A~cs/2241977

I really couldn't tolerate the added wiring of splitting a router/modem up.

OMG, I don't want an extra ethernet cable and a single power cable making GBS threads up my house.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Shaocaholica posted:

Why would you want an aftermarket modem over the one they give you? Performance?

The difference isn't going to be huge if you're going from standalone modem to standalone modem. If your ISP doesn't charge you a rental fee and provides the modem free of cost, its probably best, at least in my opinion, to keep the provided modem. That way, if anything goes wrong they can't go "Well, your modem's the problem".
All-in-one units are typically less reliable than separate modem/router setups, though, so that's why this thread recommends you avoid them.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

DaNzA posted:

You sure you couldn't flash that buffalo with DD-WRT which will allow you to change ANYTHING you want?
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.ph...o_WZR-HP-G300NH

I'm pretty sure he bought an all in one after everybody told him not to. So no ddwrt.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Nitr0 posted:

Any router over 5 years old. Reboot, Reset, Replace.

Don't even bother troubleshooting it.

But what about my precious WRT54GLs

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Telex posted:

that thing appears to be 10/100 not gigabit.

What you're asking for is going to be expensive, and probably only available on something at least in the 'small business' class or maybe a Mikrotik device. Just get a switch. Its even in the OP

The loving OP posted:

I'm out of ports on my router, why doesn't anybody make an 8 port router. Woe is me
Don't fret, goon buddy. What you need is a switch. You can get both managed and unmanaged switches. You probably want an unmanaged switch as a router is already a lot to deal with.This switch for example. 8 ports with gigabit Just plug this into your existing router, and your devices into the switch.

A switch does not add any layers, and in normal operation, you won't notice ANY difference than if it was all ports on the same router. In fact, the only difference is better performance for all your wired devices, as a separate switch is probably going to be better switching performance than your typical router (ymmv).

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

CrazyB posted:

I have a D-link DIR-825 and my cat had a fun time and knocked my router down which caused one of the 2 antennas to break. Now I'm assuming this will cause problems with signal to reach all over my house.

Now my position is the router was working fine before hand, should I get a replacement antenna or buy a new router? If so should I get OEM, should I get a D-Link upgraded one from best which cost like $30,should I go on Ebay and buy a compatible one for like $7, or is there a site that I can get good 3rd party compatible antennas for a decent price?

Dual antennas don't really help signal that much in a non-MIMO setup. Any signal advantage comes from having the antennas oriented differently, so unless you're having problems I wouldn't worry about it. I've used cheap ebay antennas on various WRT routers with no problems if you do replace the antenna.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Oaks posted:

So I've been using the Airport Extreme Base Station (what a mouthful) as my router at home, and it is loving fantastic, but I've run into a little bit of a hitch. I like to play vidja games with my buds through the internet, but the Base Station requires that the wireless zero config service be running at all times or I will get abruptly disconnected from the network. This doesn't effect anything else I do, but unfortunately zero config causes periodic hiccups in the connection that can get pretty annoying during a competitive game.

I'm too far from the router to realistically run a cable there, and unfortunately I'm renting and can't drill a hole into the basement and run a cable that way. Anyone have any ideas for a way around this?

What are you doing that would cause WZC to give you problems? WZC is just the XP wireless service. What do you expect to use if you're not using it? If you don't want to use it, upgrade to 7.

Basically, my problem with understanding your post is this:
"I'm using wireless, but my wireless is causing periodic hiccups on my game, so I want to disable my wireless."
WZC is what your computer is using to connect to the router.

Triikan fucked around with this message at 00:14 on Jan 3, 2012

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

mik posted:

This might be unanswerable, but...

In a typical new-ish apartment building, if the power goes out (and assume there's no building-wide backup generator) is internet (Cable or DSL) likely to work if my equipment is on a UPS? As in, are the telco facilities in or around the building usually on backup power? I know if I trip a breaker in my unit that's one thing, but I don't know what kind of relays and whatever cable and dsl go through on the way out of the building.

Basically is it pointless to put network equipment on a UPS to preserve internet access in the event of a power failure to the building or in the immediate area.

Your ISP's equipment will most likely not lose power. Most power outages are at the pole level, and your internet infrastructure is a bit higher level than that, and will be on a UPS at the least, and maybe a generator, depending on the setup. Of course, if somebody hits a power pole and your cable or phone line is knocked out as well, you'll lose both. I've had a couple power outages and my internet stayed up.

Triikan fucked around with this message at 00:38 on Jan 3, 2012

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Oaks posted:

Well, usually I can just disable wireless zero configuration after I've connected to whatever wireless network I want to be on. WZC is not necessary to maintain wireless connections with most networks, only to initially connect to them. The AEBS is the first router I've encountered that actually requires the service be always on. I agree it sounds like there's probably no simple workaround, but I wanted to make sure there wasn't something I was overlooking.

But, why would you want to disable the program that handles wifi on windows? What 'problems' are you having that are being caused by WZC? Doesn't make any sense.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

kode54 posted:

Isn't Atheros hardware higher quality than Broadcom crap, and also supported by at least OpenWrt? Not like that applies in this case, though.

I don't know whether Atheros or Broadcom "crap" is better than the other, but boadcom chipsets have better aftermarket support than Atheros, probably owing to the original WRT54g being broadcom based.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Dave Mustard posted:

I am running Windows 7.

Just to clarify and save me the trouble of switching between my modem and router several times to try to figure out what you want me to do can you make it step by step and as clear as possible for me. Thanks.
edit: forgot to add, I don't think I have a static address but I may have set one up a long time ago.


Edit2:

Like I said, I reset the router already a few times. I've reset it to factory defaults. DHCP is enabled and still I can't connect to any webpages. I've restarted my pc and power cycled the router too many times to count now. What the gently caress...

Do a 30/30/30 reset. Here's a step by step.
1. Unplug your modem.
2. Press and hold the reset button, count to 30 seconds
3. Still holding the reset button, unplug router's power cord, count to 30 seconds
4. Still holding the reset button, plug the power cord back into the router, count to 30 seconds.
5. Let go of the reset button
6. Plug modem back in.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Kaepora Gaebora posted:

Exactly what I'm going for
Power consumption is still not a concern since as you've probably figured, I'm not totally serious about this and most likely won't be running all/most of my servers all the time. And I will speak with the construction people about power/noise anyway.

Thanks a lot for the help. I figured I wouldn't need a managed switch. My router does VLANs anyway if i ever decide to make my network more complicated than it should be.
I'd count how many actual devices you'll have. You don't need to necessarily have every port hooked up. I am in the process of putting network jacks into basically every other wall in the house, and hooking them all up to a single gigabit switch would be pretty expensive, so I'll just have every port on a patch panel, so if I ever need to hook up to a new port, I just have to run the patch cable to a different port on the panel.

(Though I have an extra 24 port 10/100 switch with a gigabit uplink I may hook up to all my "cold" ports, that's really only ever going to be used if I host another LAN).

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

psydude posted:

I'm getting loving tired of weird wireless poo poo with my gaming rig located in my upstairs mancave, so I've decided to run copper to it from my router. Just ordered a run of the mill 8 port FE trendnet switch for my house. Why only FE? Because I don't plan on trunking 100 users with a router on a stick; gently caress you.

We're happy for you.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Feenix posted:

Interesting. That one mentions a newer model of that line with a link to it. I may go that route. (only a tenner difference. $)

Thanks

For Motorola modems, the last number only indicates a hardware revision. They're mostly identical, but Motorola found a better deal on part Y over Part X, so the 6120 uses part X, but 6121 uses the cheaper part Y.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Jonny 290 posted:

Moreover, if you DO use a crossover cable, and it's not a gig crossover cable, you'll fall back to 100mbps. This bit me a time or two.

If both devices are gigabit, you shouldn't even need a crossover cable, as they should auto-negotiate the connection.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Smegmalicious posted:

Is there an advantage to using the Linksys E2500 over the older E2000. And at that point might it just be better to use the E3000 since it's only a few bucks more?

I'm trying to avoid spending the $180 on the Airport Extreme Base here, but it's tempting. I'm really really sick of a lovely wireless connection.

I can't give you firsthand knowledge, but looking at the specs it looks like the e2500 is actually lower end spec-wise than the e2000. E2000 has gigabit and a higher clock speed processor.

If you get the E3000, Newegg has it for cheaper ($80 shipped, or if you don't mind getting a refurb, $60 shipped.)

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Whenever you change the device connected to a cable modem, you must reboot the cable modem. The cable modem is giving a connection to the device based on MAC address, and you can't simply expect it to start sending data to a new mac address without resetting it first.

This applies to hooking up a computer or switching routers.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

AceSnyp3r posted:

I've got my router to a point through trying different Tomato builds that now it'll finally keep a wireless connection up without crashing every few hours. Having another minor issue though, my ping times seem pretty wonky. Pinging yahoo.com gives me a minimum of 33ms, a maximum of 531 ms, and an average of 311ms. Pinging yahoo.com from a wired connection to the router gives me a pretty consistent ping of around 28ms, with a maximum of maybe 50ms or so. Pinging Google is pretty much the same story. Pinging 192.168.1.1 from wireless yields consistent <10ms times.

This isn't that big of a deal since I don't use any wireless devices for gaming (yet), but I'd like to know if I should blame the router, or if it's because of, well, this:

(vanfosson-2863 is my router)

I'd say its likely you're getting high pings due to the congestion. Try switching to another channel, or move to a 5ghz router.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

WYA posted:

I've been using a VPN tunnel service recently and I've been noticing that my upload speeds triple when I use it meanwhile my download speed is halved. Despite this my torrent downloads increase by a lot. Is the VPN tunnel somehow bypassing my ISPs pipeline restrictions?

Edit: Also how can I harness this power for hosting games/other things?

Bit torrent speeds go to poo poo when your upload gets capped out. If you manually set your upload speed to slightly less than your maximum, it should help your download speeds.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Cockwhore posted:

OpenVPN question:

I want to be able to access my home server from far away, and in particular I want to be able to mount shared folders. I enabled VPN tunneling on my tomato-flashed Linksys E3000, generated various keys, and setup Tunnelblick on my laptop. It seems to connect successfully, but trying to mount a folder (using the IP which would have been local if I was connected to the same network as the server), times out. When I check the IP address of my laptop, it's the same as it was before the VPN connection was established (I was expecting to see the IP of the network on which the VPN server is located). I've tried alternating between TUN/TAP, and checking "sending all traffic through VPN connection", all to no avail. Even tried setting up a PPTP VPN connection, connecting it it via system preferences, and while it still seems to connect successfully, everything is exactly like trying to connect with Tunnelblock to OpenVPN.

Am I completely misunderstanding what a VPN is and what it's used for?

What operating system is your server running? If I remember correctly I had to go into my Windows Server 2k8 install and tell it to accept connections from a VPN. Not sure how it knew it wasn't a local connection, though.

Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

So in exchange for setting my uncle's network up he gave me the router he originally intended on using, a WNR2000-100NAS. Without opening the box, is there any way of telling if it is V1, 2, or 3? I know with linksys routers you can tell by serial number but I can't find a list for this router.

EDIT: Don't want to open it in case its a v3 and not supported by third party firmwares. In that case, its getting thrown on eBay.

EDIT2: Just like always, I find the answer myself immediately after giving up and asking for help. It's a v1, supported by OpenWRT but not DD-WRT. Good enough for me.

Triikan fucked around with this message at 17:55 on Apr 22, 2012

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Triikan
Feb 23, 2007
Most Loved

Zeo posted:

Ok so I bought a WRT400N as I plan on moving out soon. While I'm at home though I wanted to set it up as a WAP in my room (and switch). I had it working for some time, but now it's decided not to work and I can't figure out what it is that changed.

CModem -> WRT54G (Tomato) -> WRT400N (DD-WRT)

I can get it to assign addresses to computers below it, and it can see the router above it (and vice versa), but it refuses to allow internet access through it. Mainly I wanted to use it as a second WiFi extension since I get poor wifi reception in my room, but my ps3 is also connected to it. I've tried a lot, but obviously I don't know what the proper config is and I keep ending up having to reset the firmware now as I keep losing access to it and that's getting old pretty fast.

Is it wired or wirelessly connected to the wrt54g? Turn off DHCP on your WRT400N, and bridge the networks.

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