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Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

I'm looking to get a tiny wireless AP that can be connected to a laptop via ethernet, essentially a tiny router.

The reason I want this is I have a bunch of trainers who go out and do demos of software products and part of the demo is to have users connect to it, when they're in an office with locked down wireless/network they need to be able to server it up somehow so we're looking at wireless.

I have a FON router with DDWRT on it that we're testing so I wanted to see if you guys knew of routers of the same size as this one.

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Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!


That actually fits pretty well except it's a bit pricey, is there anything similar to that form factor?

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!


That does sound a bit better, I did some searching and found a TrendNet Wireless Router that had a good review and another one from a manufacturer I've never heard of, CNet Wireless Router.


I'll probably get those two and test them out as we go through CDW so I won't get the refurbished price.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Scaramouche posted:

You probably already got them, but I would warn you to stay clear of TrendNET; it's basically the cheapest crappiest stuff out there in my experience. I've had their hubs and switches foisted on me by past employers ('oh they're so cheap!') but they always have died on me within a year.

I haven't really heard much about them either but the reviews I saw for it were overall positive, I am going to do a bit of testing before I pass them on so hopefully I'll catch any issues.


I found this little guy but it looks to be discontinued and I can't find anything like it out there.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Shaocaholica posted:

With real world speeds, assuming I have an N router 20ft away from an N laptop with line of sight, can I safely stream a 90minute 10GB HD movie? That's roughly 1GB every 10min.

I found an article awhile back of someone who tested this, with a 450Mbps router he streamed 1080p video but there was jittering and such involved, so technically it can be done but you'll need to do some buffering.



Guitarchitect posted:

Is the ASUS RT-N16 still a good go-to router, or has something better come along in its price range since the OP? (It's now $65 in canada with a MIR, $49 in the US, on newegg). The most traffic I will really give my home network is streaming HD content to my TV while my computer is downloading in the background (5mbit connection that maxes around 500k/sec, nothing crazy) in the background. The connection to the TV will probably be wired, but the content may be coming wireless from my PC to the router. Would dual-band be better for that?


I was just looking at this router, and for me the deal breaker is it's not dual-band. I have really band wireless saturation in my area which makes the connection super flaky if I'm not in the same room. I dug around and found the Linksys E3000 to be about the same price as the deal on Newegg so I'll probably get that instead.

Ashex fucked around with this message at 19:09 on Nov 24, 2011

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

I want a Dual-band wireless router with gigabit, is the Linksys E3000 my best option? I don't really care for the media server portion.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Looks like the E3000 can't do internal dns stock (which is screwing with my linux servers).

I'm planning on using Tomato USB, what's the process for flashing it? I downloaded a firmware but I can't flash it through the gui, will I need to tftp it instead?


Edit Nevermind, I downloaded the wrong file.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

My Cisco E3000 router that's served me well died today, not sure if it's because the power brick wasn't actually universal (just moved to Germany) or if it was finally time. The lights up top keep flickering, it's definitely not blinking so I don't think I'll be able to recover it.

Anyone have suggestions on a 450MBps dual-band router? Seems the prices have dropped since I bought mine and I'd like the speed to match the 450Mbps Trendnet adapter for my PC.

Edit: To be clear, I'm looking for something that can do dual-band with 5Ghz 450Mbps.

Edit Edit: From the OP the ASUS RT-N66U seems like a good option, are there any other I should consider? VAT adds $25 in Germany

Edit Edit Edit: Just going to make a list now


- Asus RT-N66U
- TP-Link TL-WDR4900

Ashex fucked around with this message at 18:53 on Dec 22, 2013

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

armorer posted:

Hello home networking thread! I am about to pull the trigger on a new router and am curious if the OP is up to date. The space rich option is the ASUS RT-N66U. Is the AC capable ASUS RT-AC66U an equally well loved choice? Nothing I own does AC (yet), but that doesn't dissuade me from getting it anyway. Does TomatoUSB run on it also? Are there any gotchas I should be warned about? I am comfortable flashing my router and configuring everything, I just haven't kept up with routers at all recently.

I live in a 3700 sqft, 3 story house, with plaster walls. I will be wall mounting the router near the first floor ceiling by the stairs, in hopes of getting reasonable wireless coverage throughout. Given enough time, I will have most of the house hard wired, but that won't be for several months. General use cases for the router will be streaming media to two separate entertainment centers, gaming, and torrenting of Debian ISOs (all of these things may be happening at the same time). So I'd like to get something that can see regular fairly heavy use and not cook itself in 6 months.

Edit: I see that this router was last discussed in September, and that there was a Tomato build for it then. Unfortunately the link in that post is dead now. I am fairly sure this router will be a good choice for my needs, I'm mostly wondering if there is something "newer and better" that isn't on my radar.

I did a bunch of research on this router and I'd actually advise against it. Tomato USB is available for it but I'm not sure how stable it is as the drivers are closed source. Ddwrt is available for it too but I haven't heard great things about it lately.

Take a look at the TP-Link TL-WDR4900, it's got full OpenWRT support with slightly better specs depending on how you look at them.


Edit Status of OpenWRT support for RT-N66U. I think it's the Toastman fork that has support for the RT-N66U

Ashex fucked around with this message at 16:55 on Dec 23, 2013

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

RT-N66U or the TP-Link TL-WDR4900 will work very well for them. Everyone on this thread is in love with the N66U so take your pick, if you want to stick with Tomato go with the N66U.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Is there a proper way to add a static DNS entry to a router? I've got a domain pointed to my external IP so I can access me stuff when I'm away, I'd like to have things so it resolves to the internal IP when I'm on the network. I added an entry to static DHCP which works but is there a better way to do it? I'm using Tomato USB by Shibby.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Mr Shiny Pants posted:

You would need an internal DNS server that hosts your zone. That way can add the host you want to connect to and set its IP as the internal one.

I'm using the router for my internal DNS though, I have the domain on it set to something different but I could change it to match the primary domain. Would that work? Assuming the url is snacks.strawberry.com, the internal hostname for the server is snacks and I set the domain on the router to strawberry.com. By doing so, wouldn't snacks.strawberry.com automatically resolve to the internal ip without requiring a special dns entry?

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Mr Shiny Pants posted:

If you want this to work:

snacks.strawberry.com resolves on the outside internet to your external IP right? So when a machine ask for snacks.strawberry.com it asks its configured DNS server for com.strawberry.snacks. and the configured DNS server will ask around for the DNS server that hosts this domain and if it has a record that is called snacks.

If found, it will return the IP address configured for this record. On the internet this will be your external IP address.

If you want to configure this as follows: When on the LAN snacks resolves to the internal IP address of the server and on the outside (internet) to the external IP address of the server you are creating a splitbrain DNS configuration. This in fact "breaks" how things are supposed to work but it gets done all the time. You want one URL to point to the same server wherever you are.

You need to create an internal DNS server that hosts strawberry.com and which has a record for snacks that resolves to your internal IP address for the server. All your LAN clients should point to this DNS server for this to work. This way when on your LAN your clients will ask the local DNS for snacks.strawberry.com and the internal address of the server will be returned. On the internet, due to the magic of DHCP, you will get your ISP's DNS servers and those have no idea of your own internal LAN DNS server, only the regular DNS servers, and so clients will get the external IP when asking for snacks.strawberry.com.

As Evol pointed out: Without knowing the "magic" stuff your router does this is how you usually build something like this.


Yeah, this makes perfect sense. I've only dealt with this type of DNS configuration in an Active Directory environment, I want to see if I can pull this off with just the router (I could host it on my file server but I don't want that dependency). Tomato USB uses dnsmasq for the dns server, I've got it configured so it's the primary DNS server for all clients on my network and there's a section in the admin interface to add my own custom dnsmasq configuration.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

evol262 posted:

AD doesn't do anything special regarding DNS. It's MS-DNS with dynamic updates from delegated DHCP servers (Microsoft has a checkbox for this).

Put:

address=/snack.strawberry.com/1.2.3.4

In the DNSMasq custom configuration box on Tomato.

Yeah, I probably should have used the proper name (Even then it was mainly creating A/CNAME records).

I just arrived to that conjecture when you posted, looks like this will cover forward and reverse lookups:

address=/snack.strawberry.com/192.168.1.31
ptr-record=snack,192.168.1.31


Although should I not add a ptr-record since the record for snack already exists?

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

evol262 posted:

You need a ptr for DNS to work properly if you ever want to do anything moderately security related (Kerberos, reasonable SSH timeouts, etc).

Gotcha, that's part of what I'm working on right now so I'll put that in.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

The Asus RT-N16 would be a pretty reliable router to go with, if that's a bit pricey the Linksys E2500 is another good option.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

AceSnyp3r posted:

Is the recommended router list in the OP still accurate (hasn't been updated in over a year)? I want a new router since I'm getting tired of my RT-N16's poo poo.

RT-N66U is apparently the new golden child, TP-Link TL-WDR4900 is the alternate if you're cheap.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

skipdogg posted:

I thought the new Netgear R7000 Nighthawk was the best on the block right now? I'm not sure if any of the newer AC routers have 3rd party firmware support yet though, I recall reading something about driver issues on one of the websites preventing it.

drivers for AC routers are an issue for pretty much all third party firmware right now. The only ones that have drivers are DD-WRT and some TomatoUSB builds, DD-WRT is partially closed source so they can do legal stuff to get permission and TomatoUSB devs just want to get things working. That said, don't really see the benefit of an AC router since it's so new.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Try changing the channel to 36 and see if that helps with the 5Ghz?

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

LittleBob posted:

Sorry if this is the wrong place since it's not a home issue, but I'm getting myself confused on Google and don't know where else to ask (Goons to the rescue).

My brother has bought some new IP cameras (AirCams) for his business. He's set them up on a new PoE switch. His existing network was a cheap modem/router from his cable company and another PoE switch, into which were plugged his point of sale computers, server, and IP phones.

What we want to do is keep them separate, but both still have access to the internet. Basically, he doesn't want his staff to be able to access the cameras at work or clog up his existing network, but he still wants to be able to access them at home over the internet/from his work computer if possible.

Where do I start? Everything I've read makes it sound like I need to get a new router, but is it that simple? Can anyone help?

This is doable and not trivial. Basically he'll need to setup VLANs to isolate the two networks (one VLAN for each) then configure QoS for the second network to limit the bandwidth it consumes. Would be easiest to get a router that supports OpenWRT as I believe you can assign ports to VLANs very easily via the interface. QoS can be tricky, a goon linked to a writeup a few posts up.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

The interface for DDWRT is a bit difficult to work with, Take a look at the TomatoUSB forks and try it out.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

There any routers that can handle high speed VPN traffic? I setup VPN on my E3000 and was seeing speeds of around 5Mbps, I normally get around 80-100.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!


I considered that but I'll probably upgrade my wireless router before I buy a dedicated routing appliance. I really wish I didn't give away my cisco vpn router as this would have been the perfect use.

I only really need it for my file server so I'll just figure out how to route apps through it.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

bewbies posted:

What is the current goon-preferred VPN service?

http://torrentfreak.com/vpn-service...y-2013-edition/

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

You'll probably get better suggestions, but if you're serving any content you could simply use pingdom. You can use it for free with one site.

Otherwise throw together a script to use telnet to check a port connection, see here for an example.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

I was under the impression that 5Ghz had better wall penetration and was a more reliable signal than 2.5Ghz however I keep having the problem of the 5Ghz signal being super lovely in my bedroom but the 2.5Ghz signal is strong and reliable.

Am I doing something wrong? I've got a Linksys E3000 running TomatoUSB Shibby.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

I see, well I guess I'll start shopping around for another router than. I bumped the power from 120 to 140 mW so I'll see what happens.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Does anyone know how to block youtube with tomatos network restrictions? I tried using a wildcard for youtube but the android app still works.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

My E3000 router bricked during a firmware upgrade today so I'm out a router. Working on getting another but in the meantime I dug out an old FON router running DD-WRT to see if I can use it to get things online again.

After fighting with the crazy slow interface (the router has horrible specs) and networking I've given up.

This router has one port on it so all I want to do is plug the modem in then NAT wifi over to it but the default setup is to bridge the interfaces to create a single network.

Anyone mind pointing me in the right direction on how to accomplish this?

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

I'm running a E4200 V1 with DD-WRT and the wifi speed is absolutely poo poo at 20Mbps (stock firmware is pretty limited but I die get the full speed), I've tried many tweaks including following a guide I found for getting full speed back and have had minimal success. I'm paying for a 100Mbps internet connection and after suffering with poor wifi speeds for too long have decided to get a router that can run third-party firmware properly.

I really prefer running OpenWRT/DD-WRT/Tomato on the router since I make use of things like Static DHCP, DDNS, and DNS (setting an internal record for ssl magic) that I don't really find on stock firmware.

I'm planning to get a new wireless router that has enough bandwidth for me to move my media server to wireless as I'd like to move it from my bedroom where the router/modem are located. I'm not only using it for Plex but for hosting all my photos in RAW format that I work with in Lightroom so bandwidth is pretty important as otherwise latency will make editing a complete pain.

AC isn't a big requirement since none of my devices support it (I've already got a TrendNet 450Mbps adapter I could use for my desktop or media server). I've got a budget around 100 but am slightly flexible on this. As previously mentioned, being able to run a third-party firmware is highly desired but if the stock firmware covers the requirements mentioned previously then I'm fine.

What would you guys suggest?

Edit Just learned about AsusWRT and AsusWRT-Merlin, anyone got experience with it and can comment on Wifi performance and 5Ghz support?

Ashex fucked around with this message at 12:18 on Sep 12, 2016

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Antillie posted:

If you are going to buy a new router there isn't any reason to not get one that supports AC. The Archer line mentioned in the OP is solid and offers great bang for your buck euro. However if you are dead set on running DD-WRT you might want to look at Buffalo. They make a number of routers that come with DD-WRT installed from the factory.

I may end up going with an Archer router and just run dnsmasq on the media server to get static dns. The C8 looks like it'll fill the needs and is still cheaper than the base Asus router I was looking at.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Antillie posted:

Why would you get a C8 when the C9 is much more capable and only $1.95 more? Or when a C7 is almost the same as the C8 (just lacks beamforming really) but much cheaper?

That was actually a horrible typo, I ended up buying the C7

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Got the Archer C7 yesterday and installed it. The features are pretty solid but I am really disappointed by the lack of internal DNS. I can't lookup my media server by it's hostname, just the IP address.

I setup dnsmasq on the media server and just added records for its internal and external hostname.

Otherwise I had to update the firmware immediately as I was getting incomplete downloads and flakey connections. After the update it's smooth sailing.


I'll move the media server over to wifi tonight then point the router to it for DNS and see how everything works together. Plan is have media server as primary DNS and google as secondary which should compensate for any unexpected behavior.

Ashex fucked around with this message at 14:15 on Sep 15, 2016

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Internet Explorer posted:

I only have time for a quick reply, but not having internal DNS servers is pretty normal for a consumer router. You should not need them, everything should work via NetBIOS, unless you are talking about other subnets or more advanced DNS features.

Also don't use internal and external DNS servers. DNS servers are not strictly "primary" and "secondary". It may not bother you much in your home setting, but it's really not a best practice and can cause some wacky issues.

NetBIOS only works out of the box for Windows, I'm OSX/Linux here. I use it for accessing the shares on my media server and it "looks nice".

I understand what you mean and I think you misunderstood me. I setup dnsmasq on the media server so I can set internal dns records so I can use SSL internally (butts.foo.com resolves to 192.168.1.50 on wifi) and fancy ip based conditions in nginx for disabling auth, it forwards DNS requests so I can use it. I added an external DNS provider (google) as the secondary on the router so if the media server is unavailable I'll still be able to resolve dns (After a timeout occurs).

internal DNS does exist on at least some consumer routers, I've just been running third-party for so long I forgot about it. It's all based off DHCP so I just assumed it would work. What's really annoying is I can see the hostnames for each DHCP lease on the router -_-

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Any suggestions on a usb 3.0 AC wireless adapter that works on linux? I did a bit of searching and results seem to be a bit inconsistent. I've got my media server on a 450Mbps wireless N adapter that works okay but I need a bit more bandwidth.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

all rear end no class posted:

If it has to be USB then the only game in town seems to be the TP-Link T4U

But if possible, I would get a mini-pci adapter card and put an Intel AC nic on it inside the computer.

Unfortunately I haven't got any room in the case for a card

I think I may just go with a range extender, it's overkill but everything I've read doesn't give me a lot of confidence in linux support for AC adapters.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

I just moved into an apartment that is wired for ethernet but am running into a slight problem. There's three ethernet connections (one for each room) that all run back to a tiny access box in the wall. This access box also has the termination point for DSL where the modem will go. This access box is not big enough to house both my wireless router and modem so I'm now considering how to get this done.

From my perspective I'm best off buying a dedicated routing device that is small enough to sit in that access panel with the modem and plug the ethernet for all the rooms into said routing device. Then in one of the rooms I'll plug in the wireless router but set it up to just be an AP that forwards DHCP to the tiny routing device.

Does this makes sense? If it does, what router could I get that would fit my needs?

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

smax posted:

Makes perfect sense. If you're willing to dive into some technical details, then I'd suggest the Ubiquiti ER-X. Cheap, small, and very configurable.

For the wireless, you can either use your existing wireless router somewhere (you will have to set it up in a particular way) or grab a dedicated access point (Ubiquiti has those as well).

Technical is totally fine for me, I looked at Ubiquiti a while back for that reason. Just ordered it!

CrazyLittle posted:

Network devices need cool air circulating around them to make them not die. Don't run your network devices in a sealed box. If you can fit the DSL modem and, say, a Edgerouter X in there without the box acumulating heat, then yeah that's a reasonable approach, but be prepared to just leave the box open air.

This access box was built specifically for holding the modem/router, the door has vents on it to allow air to pass through. If things get toasty I'll sort it out.

Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

Looks like the ERX isn't actually needed as the Fritzbox modem has port forwarding built-in and is surprisingly feature rich. The Cable subscription from the same provider (Vodefone/Kabel Deutschland) basically turns the modem into a dumb box if you want port forwarding and you have to use the wifi router for everything, DSL doesn't do that which is nice.

Ashex fucked around with this message at 18:50 on May 13, 2017

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Ashex
Jun 24, 2007

These pipes are cleeeean!!!

I've got a really irritating bottleneck that I can't quite figure out. My home network consists of a lovely Fritzbox router/modem for DSL that everything is wired to because the junction box has all the LAN hookups in it along with DSL and nothing else fits. My media server isn't near a LAN jack so it's plugged into a wireless router (gigabit lan connection) that does a WDS bridge over 2.5Ghz because the Fritbox doesn't do 5Ghz.

My laptop is connected to the wireless router (not fritzbox) on the 5Ghz network and when I copy files over it to the media server via rsync I get a maximum of around 3MBps.

I also notice a degradation of overall internet performance when I do this and I don't really know why. In my previous apartment where it was just the wireless router everything was much faster. Anyone have suggestions on what I can do to improve things?

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