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CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Devian666 posted:

Airport Express

No.

No no no no. This is poo poo. poo poo poo poo poo poo.

Retarded poo poo. Donkey poo poo. Retarded donkey poo poo. Keep it out of your OP or you'll get the yourself.

On the other hand, the Airport Extreme Base Station is a nice router and I'll back Star Wars Sex Parrot's recommendation 100%.

Oh hey, here's something for all you cheap shitheads who have to have 802.11N gear but run a mix of b/g/n poo poo and whine about how nothing works and I hate you. Stick this $25 router up your rear end!

Sorry, I've been hurt before. The linked router is $25. I have only tested it in basic office conditions with 10+ wifi devices blasting away signal in the area and it worked just fine here. We didn't have any N gear to use so I turned that all off and made it a g-only router. It runs PPPoE well, vpn's went through it without a hitch and there's a bunch of esoteric settings in the web interface that you can sperg over.

Frankly, for the price, I don't think you can get anything better. Even if it's glitchy it's still something to get you limping along until you can afford the sleek beauty of an AEBS or a Mikrotik RB751.

CuddleChunks fucked around with this message at 00:48 on Oct 12, 2011

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CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Pram posted:

I'm planning on wiring my place with ethernet, what face plates do you guys use?

Leviton gear all the way. Dual-gang faceplates with covers for most rooms, quads for media centers. Dual-runs to each plate, labeled on each end, terminated in a patch panel at some central spot. I don't like the structured wiring cabinets as much anymore because they are always too small for all the poo poo I want to stuff in them. 19" rackmount kits just kicks so much more rear end.

Then you can light up your rooms with cheap little gigabit switches, feed those into a mikrotik RB750G for head-end routing duties and somewhere in one of the other rooms you can put a wireless router in bridge mode to give you coverage for convenience. If the coverage is poor, place it nearer to an end of the house, then put another nearer the other end. Change to opposite ends of the spectrum and off you go.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Devian666 posted:

USB wireless adapters are bad at the best of times. I'd recommend using an internal wireless card with a decent looking aerial or three.
ugh. Internal cards are a pain in the rear end. USB wifi work fine, allow you to move the antenna the hell away from your big dumb metal tower, can be rigged into sweet long distance radios and are cheap as hell compared to internal cards.

Get a little USB adapter and a nice long cable and get it that much closer to your wireless signal. Remember to turn off power save mode for your USB hub.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



American Jello posted:

If mikrotik could make a functional web gui and a 'quick set up' type feature (dhcp client/server/nat/wifi already set up out of the box), I think they would blow all the other consumer stuff out of the water.

I haven't tried webmin (their web configuration tool) in the latest 4.x or 5.x firmwares but the earlier versions were dreadful. Who cares? Winbox takes care of 95% of all configuration tasks and a command line fills in the rest of the gaps.

I agree that if they had a more accessible interface or a dummy mode that you could start with they'd definitely be more consumer friendly. But they aren't competing in that market and I don't think they can drive their price down low enough to do so.

On the other hand, every night I go and give a sweet sensual massage to my RB750G. Then I pull out the oils and really go to town. UNF UNF UNF! I LOVE YOU SO loving MUCH YOU LITTLE HUNK OF NETWORKING SEX! UNF UNF UNF!


You probably could get a cold, clammy handy from your Linksys but you'll never know the raw passion I feel every single night from my Mikrotik. Face it, it's too much RouterOS for you.


Strict 9 - No poo poo please look at a Mikrotik for your office. They are inexpensive, have fantastic features and will do everything you've asked about. They are NOT simple to setup though I think my little guide will get you going. As enotnert pointed out, the units come with a default configuration that works just fine for home use. Best of all, once you have the unit configured you can dump the configuration out to a text file and keep that somewhere safe. If your mikrotik dies, you can buy a new one, dump your script on there and be back up and running in hardly any time at all.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



American Jello posted:

Could I set up a VM on my desktop that's on all the time that runs routerOS and set that up as a VPN server?

What OS are you using on your desktop? If it's one of the pro versions (WinXP Pro, Vista Pro, Win7 Pro) then you can just enable the PPTP server that's built into the OS. It's straightforward with the online guides available.

I've had that running on my home computer for years. Oh sure, it's super easy to add it to the mikrotik as well, but this works and once I've got a working solution it's a lot more effort to want to fiddle around with it.

Thanks for the kind words about the guide. I had a lot of fun making that and horrifying my coworkers with its prettiness.

cockmouth - urgh, I deal with Sonicwalls and other mid-range routers. Hahah have fun importing a config between units. That kind of thinking isn't solely the domain of crappy home gear.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Strict 9 posted:

This looks pretty sweet, thanks! In your guide you mention the RB433, but in this thread you mention making sweet, sweet love to the RB750G. I assume your guide still applies to that, and the RB750G is the one you'd recommend getting?

The RB433 is what I had on my desk at work while writing the guide. I rarely do much fiddling with my home unit because it works and I don't want to go home to a broken network. The RB750G is the one I'd recommend though.

I ordered my gear from these fine folks: http://www.roc-noc.com/

American Jello - that's great to hear.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Vinlaen posted:

Can anybody tell me why I should NOT get the Apple Airport Express access point?
Because you value your time and money? Because you want to have a proper wireless router rather than a halfass access point? Because you're running all windows and won't notice any apple-specific features? Because they're poo poo. Because a wireless router that will work well with all of your gear is half the cost or more?

How many reasons do you need?

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Sano posted:

But recently I had to renovate my entire basement to fit a Gaming Rig I had built about a week ago. Because of the renovation I had made, my Xbox 360 is now a few steps further away from the router, and it was just enough to cause little to no connection between it and the router. The PC computer was not having much luck connecting to it either.

Repeaters are poo poo. Move your router upstairs to see if it will clear the obstruction that's gumming up your link to the computers downstairs. Otherwise, get some ethernet and start running it inside the house so that you can give yourself a decent wired connection. This will blow any halfass wireless solutions out of the water.


Wireless is a walkie-talkie system - both sides have to be able to hear each other reliably for it to work. If you buy a directional antenna to add to your router, that's helpful because it focuses the wireless energy in the direction you want it to go. Oh sure, you now lose out on feeding service to half your house but vroom vroom there goes the wireless right at your laptop.

Too bad the laptop is still using a lovely antenna built into the molding of the screen and even though you get tons of bars of signal now your own link back to the AP is just as weak as ever. Solution? Put another AP closer that your laptop can actually talk back to properly.


Wireless is rough stuff and home wireless is worse because every neighbor fires up their own little router and clogs the airwaves with their poo poo. Worse, you can't predict how an AP is going to handle the construction materials in your home or how well your laptop/phone/game console will work talking back to the AP. If you absolutely can't avoid using wireless, then do your best to play to its strengths - use directional antennas when possible, keep the distance between AP and clients short, avoid going through tons of walls as that will generally cock up the signal and when things are sluggish try searching for better channels. In the end, think of wireless as a convenience and that will hopefully keep your blood pressure low when you're dorking around with it, trying to get it to talk to your Gaming Rig.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Wheelchair Stunts posted:

Why are repeaters bad? I've known of repeaters used in WISP equipment and numerous other uses with wireless signals. Is it just that wireless bridge consumer products tend to be poo poo or something to do with wireless repeating in general?

As others have said - repeating the signal adds a little latency but generally halves the available bandwidth. Many repeaters have poo poo for antennas so they do a crap job of repeating the signal in the first place. Ugh, they're awful and if you can avoid them do so.


Ninja Rope posted:

Antennas increase both signal reception and transmission equally.

True, though you also are now more sensitive to noise. Improving the antenna on the AP side alone doesn't guarantee a quality connection if your client still has a crap transmitter. A balanced approach helps - using directional antennas on the AP if practical and a quality transmitter on the client side that has enough power to reach back and talk to the AP.

Hell, switching to directional antennas alone makes a huge difference since you can now reject all the garbage from behind your AP.


devmd01 posted:

its me, im the lovely neighbor. Ubiquiti AP at the peak of my attic...haven't done a proper site survey, but let's just say that streaming pandora over wifi-only on my blackberry in every corner of my yard works just fine.
Heheh right on.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Goodpancakes posted:

We have a nice lab setup in the basement of a University building with several computers and a printer all plugged into the University network. The problem is that anyone in the building can access the printer without being in the lab. The result is that we run through a TON of toner due to people jacking the printer and printing stuff from somewhere else in the building. Is there a solution to this particular problem?

See if your printer supports a whitelist feature - maybe you can authorize PC's by IP address and just add your local lab. This would be the least disruptive way to handle this.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Jimlad posted:

For some reason when I turn NAT off on my modem, I can no longer connect to anything on the internet. I can access the modem itself though. Shouldn't it just work, or is there some obvious setting I'm missing?

How does your modem connect to the network? Have you duplicated those types of settings in your PC? Why are you turning off NAT are you trying to set this modem up as a bridge?

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Jimlad posted:

My modem is a crappy Netgear modem/router that I want to use only as an ADSL modem. It connects to my nice new Asus router's WAN port, which connects all the other devices on my LAN.

Hit up google with "set netgear <your model number> bridge mode" and see if someone has written a walkthrough. You'll need to know your connection type - pppoe, pppoa, dhcp, or static ip's - so that you can program your Asus router once you have the netgear in bridge mode.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Jimlad posted:

I'm pretty sure I did, but I tried again tonight with a 30 second wait just to be sure. Again, Tomato says it has an IP address and it's connected, but still I can't connect to anything on the internet.

What IP address does your tomato router get? What is the LAN IP address of that same router?

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Jimlad posted:

The Asus/Tomato router is set up on 192.168.1.1.
Cool, you're getting a pppoe connection.

Change your Asus to a LAN IP range of 192.168.3.1, make sure it updates the dhcp server to use that range and then plug everything back in and see if it magically works.

Also, try fagalicious' suggestion.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Jimlad posted:

Doesn't seem to work.
It's strange that the pppoe connection from your Asus goes through the Netgear and gets an IP address but you aren't pulling down data. That's seriously weird.

Do you have your computer setup with a static IP address when you're doing these setups? Can you ping any IP addresses out on the internet when PPPoE shows connected? Try 4.2.2.2

If it doesn't ping what error message do you get back? (Do this test from a windows command prompt so you can paste the error code back to us)

There is a chance it may never work but here's another site that mentions your router: http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/1608943 See if you have that setting and change it after doing the above tests. Try again and see if that makes things work if it wasn't set on before.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Jimlad posted:

So, it seems likely to me that this is the problem; I need to be able to access PPPoA on my Asus router. Is this possible, and is it dependent on the hardware or the firmware? I don't think Tomato allows PPPoA (at least I can't see any options for it), but can I get it to work through DD-WRT or similar?

Sorry, you're out of luck. The PPP is being routed over an ATM interface provided by the DSL circuit. DD-WRT won't know how to talk to that, same with Tomato. You've done everything you can, go setup the netgear as a regular router, plug yours in behind it and accept double-nat as a fact of life with that setup. Bummer.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Devian666 posted:

Double NAT isn't the end of the world and it should function reliably.

My entire village was decimated by a plague of NAT.

I grew up an orphan because of misconfigured PAT rules.

Don't you dare talk to me about what is a minor inconvenience to everyone else. YOU HAVE NO IDEA!

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Jimlad posted:

I got it working! Figures, the crappy Netgear modem was REALLY crappy and was the cause of all my troubles. I got a Linksys and everything just works. Yays. Thanks for your help, everyone.
Hooray! I'm glad you got things running finally!

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Thoom posted:

  • Gigabit WAN throughput.
  • Doesn't poo poo the bed on a regular basis
  • Port forwarding
  • Edit: NAT, though I figured this would be a given
  • VPN support
  • Multi-WAN.

This should do the trick: http://www.roc-noc.com/mikrotik/rou...rd/rb750gl.html

Notice I removed "Easy web-based management". In the 5.7 firmware their web management is vastly improved. Winbox is still super nice to work with and sometimes you have to dig in with a terminal session to program some of the more esoteric settings. High-level stuff - setting up NAT, multiple IP's, etc. - is all done through graphical interfaces.

This isn't a Linksys with a cuddly set of dropdown boxes. It's a business grade router that kicks a lot of rear end in its teeny tiny package. Their online documentation is pretty decent and there's a thread here in SH/SC that you can check out to see what you're getting into.

I think you'll be happy with this unit and it's hard to beat the price.

Update: Just saw the recommendation up above for the RB1100AH. If you run a lot of data over your VPN's, then having the extra horsepower is going to be helpful. It should also have better raw throughput than the RB750GL, but it's going to be much more expensive (and noisy).

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



The_Franz posted:

http://www.ilsistemista.net/index.p...ew.html?start=2

The 750GL is a great unit, but there is no way you are going to actually do routing/firewall/NAT on a full gigabit connection with it.
Cool, thanks for finding that review. I guess the RB1000 or RB1100AH units will be needed to push the megabits through his fast connection.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Triikan posted:

EDIT: I'd also like to be able to do this on a WRT-54GL, because its not being used, and I have huge rear end antennas for it.
Read up on Captive Portals and Hotspots using DD-WRT. Chilispot I think is the name of one of the modules you can load in to do this. It's a pretty common thing to do, you shouldn't have any problems using the info at the DD-WRT wiki.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Shaocaholica posted:

Whats with all these new routers not having external antennas? Are aftermarket high gain antennas a thing of the past?

I imagine it's cheaper to build without using external antennas.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



ryanbruce posted:

Well that doesn't explain why it drops to crap speeds though, saturating the pipe shouldn't make the overall Rate drop. (117Mbps in the photo but if I were streaming via MCE it'll drop to 11 or so)



Also, keep in mind that the issue happens just on the WinMCE menu too. Granted MCE Extenders work by basically creating an RDP session to my computer, it shouldn't be causing *that* kind of grief (especially when it doesn't cause me any problems when RDP'ing from my laptop to my desktop)

What the gently caress?

Share a folder with some video files on your media server upstairs. Fire up a laptop and head down to your xbox. Sit near it and connect up to the network. Open up your media server and drag a file onto your desktop. Take a gander at your wireless speeds and see if they poo poo themselves as well when transferring a file.

Under the hood I worry that a ton of SMB packets are getting transferred and causing the router to retransmit frequently then fallback in its data rates lower and lower until it can get consistent throughput to the Xbox. I don't know how you'll fix it yet but I'm curious if a laptop has the same problem.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Binary Badger posted:

Linksys / Cisco truly doesn't give a poo poo or warn anybody when they decide to change their hardware. It's like with the WRT54G, suddenly after v4.0 they went from 16 MB RAM and 4 MB flash RAM to a paltry 8 MB RAM and 2 MB flash RAM with hardware v.5.0, forcing DD-WRT to create micro versions that could fit into the 2 MB flash space.

For reference, the WRT54G v4 and prior boards were design models. They were used for tweaking the WRT54G series and making sure the design was stable and working to the satisfaction of the hardware engineers at Linksys. The v1 boards are especially notable because they featured removable miniPCI wireless cards.

Moving forward, the designs were standardized, the wireless chips integrated onto the board and now that they had finished their testing and design they could move to a low cost production board with all the fat trimmed away. Introducing the WRT54G v5 using VXWorks for the OS and half the RAM and Flash of its predecessors. From that point on, they have been cheap as dirt to make since everything is onboard and the motherboard hasn't had to be updated for many versions. This does mean that you have sad little crippled routers for hobbyists, but Linksys isn't in business for hobbyists, it's there to sell a ton of these to Sprint and Walmart and everywhere else.

They did release a beefy version a couple years ago - WRT54GL - so you can easily install third party firmwares.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Ephphatha posted:

I help run a LAN party, and we're trying to redo the cable bundles. Currently we've got long runs of Cat5 (cable lengths range from 5m to 20m) bound with plastic cable ties. These have been in use for the past 7 or so years without ever being redone. A significant percentage of cables in each bundle are damaged (5-10%) but because they're bound with cable ties we can't easily remove a single cable to replace it.

Grab a half rack of beer, get a couple buddies over with the following:
- diagonal cutters
- flat cutters
- ethernet cable tester
- bag of cable ties
- crimps and ends

Put on some loud, stupid movie (Robocop, Clash of the Titans, Conan the Barbarian (both!)) and have yourselves a maintenance party for your LAN gear.

Cable ties are cheap as poo poo, especially in bulk so there's no excuse not to buy more. Lacing the wiring will look super smooth but is annoying when you need to replace a cable. Velcro cable ties work very well but will tend to soak up fluff from the carpet and become less useful over time.

The diagonal cutters are for cutting through the existing cable ties and the flat cutters are for when you put together the new bundles. Make sure all the cable ties are nice and snug and facing the same way. Spend time to get the heads on the same side of the cable so that when you drag this beast through someone's house it won't snag due to haphazard placement of cable ties.

Hell, if you were in the area I'd love to help you with this.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Brace posted:

2. Why are my port forwards not sticking? I have Block Anonymous Internet Requests unchecked, I put the port numbers in, leave the IP box default, and click enable, save settings. "Ok your settings have been saved" but then all the boxes are blank again when the page reloads.

Make sure and use Internet Explorer. Or, if you are using IE, don't use IE and see if that fixes things. The browser you use to config the router can sometimes mess up the settings.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



mikecj posted:

Is there a range/signal quality issue with windows workgroups?
No.

Take a computer on the main network and write down its IP address. Compare that to what it gets from the airport express. Likely it will differe in the third set of digits: 192.168.1.140 on the main network, 192.168.0.101 on the airport express network. This means it is on a different network than the rest of the house and won't be able to talk to the windows workgroup properly without ridiculous levels of hackery.

Instead, you need to flatten the network so that the airport express is acting as a wireless bridge, not a little router. Consult your airport user guide on how to do this.


Or, consider pooling your money together and replacing that horrific hodge-podge with a few ubiquiti nanostations to bridge between buildings so that your site-to-site transfers are in the 50 - 70Mbps range. Then put in a more capable router at the headend, something with packet shaping, a content filter and a bigass squid proxy to hold as much data locally as you can to cut down on overall traffic. There are several projects that help with this.

Don't get me wrong, I've seen worse networks but anytime you have one growing organically like that it's nice to have an outsider come in, cry in horror and rebuild it from the ground up with common parts and settings. Sure, you lose the cool factor of "dude, check out what I did with all these castoff routers" but you gain a tremendous jump in speed and reliability. That's assuming there are any decent network engineers in your area that will consult on a project like this. Plenty of backwoods places don't have options and you just have to work with whatever is there.

Good luck to you, I work with rural broadband all day and it's a little traumatizing now and again to see the kinds of networks people have cobbled together over time.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Odette posted:

At the moment, the router's sitting on the kitchen bench and there's no room for the NAS around, not to mention that I don't really want liquid/foodstuffs near the hardware. Waiting for upstairs to get rewired so I can move the NAS/modem.
Scary avatar person - buy a switch for $25 or so and have that manage your workstation and your NAS. This will eliminate the fuckery of Internet Connection Sharing, will give you full speeds to the NAS from the local network and will let you shuffle gear around a bit. It's a win-win deal.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Henrik Zetterberg posted:

Does anyone have any suggestions on a decent network cable crimping kit? I'm a whiz at stripping wires, so one of these is purely optional. I'd like a 110 punchdown tool as well. I was looking at this:
http://www.amazon.com/Paladin-Tools...28245719&sr=8-3

That's a nice little kit. I've used the crimpall series and one that looks like that only with orange handles (it's a rj45 and rj11 crimper). It should do just fine for a home job.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Fangs404 posted:

A slight amendment to this question. So he wants to make sure the AP is capable of handling lots of connections. The office currently has 40 employees. Laptops and cell phones will be connected to the wireless, so it needs to be able to handle decent throughput. What AP and repeaters would you guys recommend for a setup like this?

Call a company and have them give you a quote for installation and management of this gear. Let them deal with this level of bullshit.

If for some reason you're stuck making recommendations then take a look at the Ubiquiti Unifi series of access points. It lets you set up several pods that talk back to a central controller. You'll need to dedicate a computer to this task and run ethernet to each of the pods to power them and let them communicate but that's the slick way to do this. You can then setup a nice looking wifi network that should handle a large number of users and can be expanded by adding more AP's as you need.

Doing this on the cheap for a business that size is pretty ill-advised and will mostly lead to heartache.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Ninja Rope posted:

What is the fresnel zone for 900mhz?
900MHz gear is unusable for Ration's purposes.

The 5GHz shot with parabolics should work fine. It's going to be fussy to align but the info you've given indicates a decent LOS.

2.4GHz will have a bigger fresnel zone, be more susceptible to water interference, have half the available bandwidth and is likely to be crowded as poo poo.

Happily, both equipment types are pretty dang cheap for a simple point-to-point shot. Here's hoping the 5GHz stuff works right out of the box.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



ultimateforce posted:

For a while I was running a buried ethernet cable in PVC pipe but I kept having problems with the cable going bad for whatever reason.

1. Make sure the cable run is shorter than 328' from the router in the house to the termination in the other building.
2. Buy direct-burial shielded CAT5 for the job.
3. Run a stringer line along with the cable through the PVC. In case you have to re-run the cable, having a stringer in there makes pulling new cable a cinch.
4. Ground the ends of the cable properly so that they aren't creating a nasty electrical potential on the wire. If this cable shocks the poo poo out of you when it rains, you'll know you didn't ground things properly.


A proper ethernet run is going to rule the roost. Shooting wireless into a metal building is bullshit and since you mentioned having no budget, you can't afford the gear to make it work well.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Ration posted:

Edit: Couldn't Ultimateforce overcome the 328 feet (100 meter) restriction by using Power Over Ethernet adapters?
If you mean Ethernet over Powerline adapters then maybe. Power Over Ethernet means you don't have to run an extension cord out to your radio or switch or whatever you have at the end of the ethernet cable. 2 pairs carry the positive and negative voltages, the other 2 pairs carry data. This means you're always limited to 100Mbps speeds but it's a hell of a lot better than trying to drag power cords everywhere.


ch1mp posted:

Hopefully a quick question - I have a computer running unbuntu in my garage on a separate internal subnet. I want to connect to windows shares on my office computer from this computer without exposing the office computer more than necessary.
You're pretty well screwed. Windows filesharing doesn't like to work across subnet boundaries. If you setup a WINS server and do a ton of fuckery you might get this to work but it's a supreme amount of hassle. You might be able to setup a samba share on your ubuntu computer, use Remote Desktop to talk to the office machine and then move data in that direction when you need it. That would probably be a lot less hassle than going the other way.



ultimateforce posted:

Anyway, long story short I need a wireless bridge or switch in the detached building.
Am I understanding your situation correctly: you have two buildings. Internet comes into one and terminates in a wireless router for the house, but 60' away is the shop which you want to sit in with your laptop and watch movies or whatever. You've already tried running an ethernet cable over there (the most correct solution) but have had problems with your cabling. Is that a correct summary?

If that's the case, I'm still going to recommend redoing the ethernet run and then picking up whatever cheapie wifi router you find. Set it into bridge mode and it should run like a champ in that building.

You mentioned something about 90% signal, where are you getting that? Is your laptop already picking up the main house's signal well?

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



What channel is it broadcasting on in G mode? Make sure it's set to 1 - 11 and not something higher than that. Still, it sounds like something is acting lovely and maybe a reset and reprogramming of the router will help. If not, time to get a new one.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



SplitSoul posted:

It does channel auto-scan, but in both /n, /g and /g/n mixed mode it was broadcasting on 1, which wasn't used by any nearby network I could find through inSSIDer.

Weird, it should default to 6 for broadcasting in N so it can suck up the most bandwidth (because N is awful). Regardless, set it to G mode and move it to channel 11 and see if there is any change. I'm curious if some non 802.11 sources are interfering with your connection. It could still be a bum router but it's cheap to fiddle with settings for a bit.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



sinky posted:

I've got an HP Microserver (running esxi) that can't have a wired connected to the Netgear.
Is the following network setup possible? I've been trying and failing to get it to even ping the Netgear or anything connected to it.

wlan is set up as a station with the ip 192.168.0.18, connected to the Netgear.
The RB751G-2HnD is 192.168.2.1

code:
Microserver     wired    Mikrotik RB751g     wlan       Netgear DG834G :(  internet
192.168.2.10 ------------ 192.168.2.0/24 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 192.168.0.0/24 ------------

Do you really want the microserver to be on a different network segment than the netgear router? If it actually has to be on the 192.168.2.x subnet all by itself then you will need to setup routing or nat-ing on the mikrotik. NAT is easy but you can make the mikrotik act as a little router easily too. Whatever takes your fancy.

If you're having problems with bridging the traffic, try setting the wlan into station-pseudobridge mode and see if it starts working.


Zero VGS posted:

I just bought a 2200mW Wifi adapter. It's amazing and gets 4-bar signals from blocks away. My question is, is this thing really drawing 2.2 watts from a single USB port? That seems like it's cutting it close to the theoretical limits, and I'm afraid something is going to catch fire.
Where the hell did you buy a 2200 milliWatt wireless adapter? Seriously, what the hell? Please post a brand and model number because that sounds wrong as hell. A *200* milliWatt adapter is common as a high power device but I can't imagine you being able to find a multi-watt unit.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Jonny 290 posted:

Did you buy something like this?
http://www.amazon.com/NextG-USB-Yag...W/dp/B0044D7J1W

Good lord that looks horrid. I had no idea you could buy 2.2W transmitters outside of special purpose shops. Craziness. No wonder the wifi spectrum is so screwed up with noise.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Inspector_71 posted:

Is there any DD-WRT compatible router out there with 256MB+ of RAM and wireless? It seems like 128 is the best you can get in the consumer arena right now, although I'm finding it super hard to actually find RAM data for most routers.
The gently caress you need that much RAM for? Let me rephrase - what crazy rear end consumer router needs that much RAM? A border router, hell yes but not something for customers.

Inspector_71 posted:

I've looked into MikroTik stuff, but my boss isn't really sold on it since it would require us to stock a bunch of MikroTik routers in case we get failures and managing MicroTik seems kind of hard and I'm not actually that good at computers.
It can be daunting at first but they are sooooo pretty deep down inside. VLANs and bridging and wireless and routing and true border routing (BGP) and crazy routing (OSPF) are all supported out of the box. The hardware is cheap and if you need beefier boxes they are available as well.

On the other hand if you don't have any experience with them they can be weird and offputting. They don't have a cuddly web interface like DD-WRT (though the newest 5.x series has made progress on that front). It's a gamble either way you go. If you stick with Linksys and DD-WRT you may get a decent price/performance ratio as well as having an easy path for replacement units most of the time. Mikrotiks are definitely hampered by having a really flaky supply chain.

Good luck whichever you choose.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



ColHannibal posted:

The nice man from India told me to turn off "Filter anonymous internet request" and set my MTU to 1365 as opposed to "auto".

Hahahah.

Now your router is pingable from the world, which is great for troubleshooting. No problems there, but unless someone outside your network is monitoring your connection this will do nothing.

Changing your MTU will make sure that any fragmentation issues are resolved... which you aren't having.



You, on the other hand, need to start up some of your own tests. Start pinging google and your router from your computer. When you next have a drop, see which ping is timing out. If it's both, the bug is inside your network. If it's just google then you may need to talk to your ISP. Before you do that, plug directly into your modem (dsl/cable/wireless/whatever) and see if you get the dropouts. If you don't, then it's the router being a piece of poo poo.

Do you torrent? If so, knock that off for a while and see if the drops cease.

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CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Vargatron posted:

I guess the math would be the main thing I'd like to understand. I understand that subnetting is used to divide a network into segments and to get around the impending IPv4 exhaustion that is upon us. I've got bits and pieces of it, but I'm failing to see the big picture I think.

Subnetting is for squares man. CIDR is the way we all roll now and IPv6 is like, the future!


Subnetting in a nutshell - Every IP address is broken into two parts: network address and host address. The left side is the network side, the right is the host. However many bits you use to represent the network, subtract that from 32 and you have exactly how many bits available for hosts.

CIDR notation makes this clear by explicitly telling you the network bitsize. You then subtract from 32 and know the host size implicitly. An example:

192.168.1.0/24 - Common home network address. There are 8 bits remaining for hosts which gives you 256 possible. Subtract 2 (network gateway and broadcast address) and now you have 254 total live hosts on the subnetwork.

192.168.1.0 = Network
X.X.X.1 - X.X.X.255 = Hosts

Traditional subnetting looks weird because you'll see numbers like 255.255.255.254, or 255.255.255.240. Dude, don't panic, it's just the decimal representation of binary digits. 8 binary 1's gives you 255 as the number. What does the number 240 look like in binary? 11110000 It looks like there are 4 zeros in there. That would give me 2^4 = 16 host addresses to work with.

Maybe that's the weird part for you, you read left - right in the binary represenation and look for the 0's. When you hit those, count how many you have and raise 2 to that power. Now you know how many hosts you've got.
pre:
Common subnets
Decimal          CIDR  Old Mnemonic or how I encounter them 
255.0.0.0       = /8   Class A
255.255.0.0     = /16  Class B
255.255.255.0   = /24  Class C
255.255.255.128 = /25  Half Class C
255.255.255.252 = /30  DSL single static IP
255.255.255.255 = /32  PPPoE Client
Hope that helps. Subnetting is a major pain.

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