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Methylethylaldehyde
Oct 23, 2004

BAKA BAKA


therunningman posted:

Any tips for planning a network layout for a new house?
So far I am thinking of two Cat5e and two RG6 to two points in each room. All going to a rack in the utility room.
I am debating if it is worth it to run conduits for everything.

Having just done this, not really. Once it's up in the attic, it's not a big deal to just zip tie the bundle to a nail or something. In areas where you can actually trip or fall onto the wires, conduit is a good idea. So the area from the attic or crawlspace to the rack would be a good idea.

I did two cat5, one cat5, one RG6, and one telephone to each room in the house, and terminated them using those keystone jacks.

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Methylethylaldehyde
Oct 23, 2004

BAKA BAKA


Chiming in that Mikrotik stuff is awesome if you want a ISP style router/ap without all the poo poo that comes with using Cisco. The downside is you have other poo poo that comes with Mikrotik, but the fancy GUI configuration and monitoring software of pretty loving nice. If you don't instantly go cross-eyed or run in horror from serial interfaces, putty, and CLI stuff, and need more than Tomato can offer you, I recommend Mikrotik.

Having a 250mW A/B/G/N that supports 40Mhz channels and 5ghz, plus can use any N-type antenna is loving nice. My AP can hear my crappy underpowered laptop signal from anywhere on the block, and if I wanted to be a dickhead, blast my signal at ~20dBm, which is loving retarded for an omnidirectional antenna.

Additionally, you can do stupid poo poo like multipath weighted round robin load balancing, with stateful routing and the ability to force specific macs, ips, or ports through different internet links. Comedy route all the counterstrike gameplay (port 7086) traffic on your network via your backup satellite link!

Methylethylaldehyde
Oct 23, 2004

BAKA BAKA


BCRock posted:

Am I missing any major components that I'll need? Any other advice as I get started on planning out where the stuff is going to go?

On a ranch style house with crawlspace access, I would just go for broke and wire it one time then never ever screw with it again.

I would put 2 runs of cat6, 1 run of cat5e, and one coax per 4 port box. I would put two boxes per room, on opposite sides of the room, so no matter how you change your mind later, you'll always have coax and internet ports within a few feet of the endpoint.

Get a 12U wall mount rack and put it in the garage up out of the way. Mount the switch and patch panel there. Terminate each of the runs at the patch panel and be sure to label everything. Then verify the labels are right. Bed1UL, Bed1UR, Bed1LR lets you know it's the first bedroom, and the physical location of each port without having to put labels inside the house.

The Cat5e when wired to the B spec works amazingly as phone line, and the ports are compatible with the RJ-11 plugs. Super handy if you need to set up DSL or need to add a fax machine or something.

Methylethylaldehyde
Oct 23, 2004

BAKA BAKA


H2SO4 posted:

The golden rule is if you’re going to run one, then run multiple. Materials cost is nothing compared to the elimination of the need to go back and pull more cable.

This. Plus having to buy multiple boxes of cable means you can run all 4 wires at once, and do each room right off the spool, and avoid having to guess, cut and throw away bits later.

Edit: Also, you can run 8 wires to each room if you want to, but you only need to patch them in when you need them. If you get an IP phone at some point because you have a cool new Asterix PBX you're toying around with, it doesn't cost you much time to walk out to the garage or down to the basement, unpackage a new patch cable, and run the cable from the patch panel to the switch. Just because you have 40 wires running around your house doesn't mean you need a 48 port switch, you can often get by with a 16 port one that's substantially less money, because you probably won't ever have more than 10ish devices wired in direct.

Methylethylaldehyde fucked around with this message at 09:39 on Jul 23, 2018

Methylethylaldehyde
Oct 23, 2004

BAKA BAKA


bolind posted:

Goddamnit, I'm about ready to yank out this Cat6 and hang myself with it.

First my AC Lite worked fine, except it only linked up at 100 mbit.

Attempts two, three and four had it PoE'ing fine, booting, but not getting link at all (it appears.)

I borrowed a cheapo cable tester which seems to claim that wire 4 is always hosed, even on a brand new 1 meter cable.

What are the downsides of grabbing a 30 meter ready made cat6 patch cable, chopping off one end, pull it through conduit, and attach a female plug at the naked end?

Check to see if your crimp tool doesn't have a bent/damaged blade. Sometimes if the crimps are consistently bad, you need to just get a new tool. You can also get a punchdown tool and a pair of keystone jacks, and some 6" patch cables, and see if that works better for you.

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