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Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


fagalicious posted:

I have an airport express and I'm seconding this. Its horrible as a router. I bought it for the airtunes and tried using it as an access point, but the signal was pretty weak. I just use it for my outdoor audio gear now, works great for that. But dear god don't get one to use as a router or access point.

Also don't get one as a repeater either. There's something about its lovely, tiny, integrated antenna that makes it great for reception, but atrocious for transmission. I've only ever used it for hooking up wireless speakers. Using one as your main access point seems to only work if your wireless device is less than ten feet away from it.

The AEBS however, especially the latest version, is the bee's knees for any setup that is modern Macs (within the past 2 years) or has Broadcom wireless hardware. It's got the 3X3 MIMO setup and the best throughput / transmitting power of any of the Airport Base Stations, as mentioned in a recent Anandtech review.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 23:01 on Oct 23, 2011

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Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Migishu posted:

Should I bother with anything that says Speedboost or should I just completely ignore it as it's some sort of lovely buzzword like it was 3 years ago?

"SpeedBooster" is a term used on Linksys routers that had a certain set of 802.11g Broadcom based chipsets. If your desktop/laptop also used Linksys Broadcom based chipsets intended to be SpeedBooster compatible, they'd work at an effective 125 Mbits/sec using some proprietary compression schemes, depending on whether or not you have a lot of easily compressible data in your stream.

Atheros has different buzzwords for its compression schemes, like Super-G or Super-AG.

In fact, you can use this to identify what chipset is being used in the card / router.

tl;dr: it's still a lovely buzzword, especially if you know you're using a different chipset in your desktop/laptop.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 21:32 on Nov 9, 2011

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Shaocaholica posted:

Whats the deal with the DIR-655? Its got ~1800 reviews on newegg with a really high avg rating but it doesn't support any of the custom firmwares.

It uses a Ubicon CPU which isn't supported by DD-WRT or Tomato.

It's an 802.11n router with built-in gigabit LAN/WAN ports (albeit 2.4 GHz 802.11n only) that's now selling for a sale price of $65 (was $99) and three external antennas which will give you MIMO capability / increased throughput (assuming you're using 802.11n wireless equipment..)

Also its firmware has a bunch of features similar to those found in Tomato / DD-WRT, such as the ability to set antenna power, QoS settings, manual settings for the WAN port (can be set to gigabit for best compatibility with DOCSIS 3.0 modems.) Also seems to have some sort of Virtual Server feature in addition to the standard port forwarding options. Another interesting feature is that it can automatically email system logs to an arbitrary / external address and has a website filter that allows you to enter URLs that will be blocked by the router itself.

I'd say it looks like a good router for sysadmin types who don't need that newfangled 5 GHz technology. You could conceivably swap out its three little 2 dB antennas for more robust 5 dB antennas for even more range.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 04:44 on Nov 28, 2011

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


E1000's can be flashed to the mini version of DD-WRT, a 300 MHz Broadcom CPU and 32 MB of RAM should help a bit as well, probably better for torrenting than your current setup.

Edit: micro ain't mini

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 15:52 on Dec 1, 2011

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Shaocaholica posted:

I still don't get the relationship between 802.11n, MIMO and 5ghz. Don't the client devices also need to support MIMO and 5ghz in order to take advantage of them?

MIMO is part of the 802.11n standard. If a device doesn't have at least 2 antennas then it's not really 100% of the 802.11n spec. 5 GHz is noted in the standard definition, but its inclusion is not absolutely necessary for a device to be labeled 802.11n, as we've seen by the many cheap 2.4 GHz 802.11n routers. Multiple antennae are necessary to provide the increased throughput, as each transmits a different part of the datastream. A perfect example is the D-Link DIR-655 mentioned earlier; it's 2.4 GHz but it's also 802.11n and has three antennas.

quote:

Am I poo poo out of luck on older 802.11g laptops by just upgrading the mini-pci card since they may only have 1 or 2 internal antennae?

As long as the laptop has a PCMCIA slot, you could get one of these.. supposedly has three chip antennas inside.

Do you intend to use it in a place where they have 802.11n equipment installed? If all you see is refurb WRT54Gs or noname access points with only one antenna, it's doubtful. (Although some routers use an external antenna for transmit and hide the integrated antenna inside for receive, like the Asus 520U.) If its for yourself you'd have to get a decent 802.11 router.

BTW, the Apple Airport Extreme 5th Generation base station gets fabulous signal because they implement MIMO, with four teeny chip antennas. Check the Anandtech review for more info.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 17:01 on Nov 28, 2011

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Shaocaholica posted:

To get MIMO to work, I assume I have to enable it on the router and also on the client(?).

Yup, you have to have it on both sides if you want the increased speed. Also preferably you'd want equipment using the same vendor hardware, like Atheros to Atheros, or as in the case of most modern Macs, Broadcom to Broadcom.

One good way of looking this up is the DD-WRT Router Database which usually lists the exact chips used by each wireless router, sometimes it'll provide a link to other information like CPU speed, RAM/Flash capacity, power output, etc.

quote:

Also, 5ghz is really only useful because 2.4ghz gets crowded? But it has a shorter range and is affected more by walls and obstacles?

Pretty much, it's not so great in a multi-floor dwelling. The higher the frequency (Kenneth?) the shorter its range; but the flip side is that the higher frequencies can carry more data over unit time which is great for streaming, torrenting, etc.

German U-boats used very low frequencies to transmit / receive, but since the data was relatively tiny (just dots and dashes of Morse code) it worked okay.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 16:56 on Nov 28, 2011

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Shaocaholica posted:

So on a mac or a windows box, where do you typically find the mimo settings? Will I have to install some vendor app?

On the Mac it's all done in the drivers, especially if you're using an Apple Airport; you don't get to do anything other than define router settings (SSIDs, whether or not to do 802.11a/n only or b/g only, support simultaneous dual band or not, etc.) in the Airport Utility.

quote:

Also, if I'm using a dual band router, how do I know if I'm connecting on 2.4ghz or 5ghz since they're both active right?

On most dual bands you get the choice of doing dual or just one at a time, and it's up to you to name the 2.4 GHz network and the 5 GHz networks differently. It's usually better for the router to have the N capable clients on the 5 GHz and regular B/G clients on the 2.4 GHz, especially since the 2.4 GHz clients won't 'see' the 5 GHz network.

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


I stand corrected, didn't refer back to the 802.11 N second draft.

Broadcom's least expensive chip, the BCM5356 implements single stream N, it's in the Asus RT-10U wireless router that sells for only $30 street price. Top throughput is only 150 Mbit. I might just pick it up to see if it's worth adding to the suggested routers in the OP, especially since it's DD-WRT compatible. Plus it has 16 MB of RAM, almost unheard of in a $30 router.

I think most people reading this thread are only concerned with their laptops / desktops though.. it's not like you'd ever be able to change the wireless hardware inside a smartphone, maybe for a particular tablet if it has a mini-PCI slot inside.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 04:13 on Nov 29, 2011

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


The WNDR3700 v2 uses a honking fast 680 MHz MIPS processor for the CPU and has 64 MB RAM / 16 MB Flash!

Edit: The v1 is identical except it only has 8 MB Flash RAM.

MIPS processors were originally used in SGI workstations and servers (and incidentally, the Nintendo64) so it's no wonder it's fast / stable. There is a DD-WRT build for it, but if the stock firmware is rocking it, why bother?

Back in 2004, Atheros fully licensed MIPS processor cores to make their wireless chipsets better/faster.

It's also worth noting that Ubiquiti uses the same chipset in a few of their RouterBoard models.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 04:41 on Nov 29, 2011

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


^^^ Don't want to rain on anyone's parade but quite a few Amazon reviews say they only last several months before they wind up failing from overheating.. maybe that's why the price dropped? Pick up a Dremel and slice some vents into them? I did that for my old WRT54G v4 when I overclocked it..


Slider posted:

I just got my e1000 v2.1, should I flash it to the dd-wrt thing or use the "official" firmware? I'm new to this.

If you're new to flashing in general, maybe you might want to stick with the built-in firmware. I see that v.2.1 is pretty new and only recently did a DD-WRT mini build come out for it (you can't use DD-WRT firmware for v.1.0 or 2.0, you must get the v.2.1 specific build) and from what people are saying on the DD-WRT forums it's still kind of buggy.

Edit: mini ain't micro

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 15:54 on Dec 1, 2011

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


As long as you select WPA2 Personal encryption and select a decently complex password (definitely not anything in the dictionary) for the network itself you should be fine; if there's an option for a 'Guest' network or guest account as you said, yes, I'd just disable it.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 22:08 on Nov 30, 2011

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


NOTinuyasha posted:

I have an E1000 v2.1 running openvpn_small sitting right next to me and I haven't had any issues.

Looks like he went ahead and flashed the micro version, so it's fine..

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


NOTinuyasha posted:

You're supposed to use K2.6 builds for any E-series router, and there isn't a micro K2.6 build available. I'm not even sure how he managed to flash it to micro, given the E1000 prefixed builds only come in the K2.6 mini package. I guess the router doesn't check firmware then, in which case he's lucky that he didn't brick it.

For any other potential E-1000 v.2.1 users:

If you go here: http://www.dd-wrt.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=138056&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=25

The 'official' DD-WRT build as posted in the URL above, by the developer / maintainer himself, for the E-1000 v.2.1 is entitled "dd-wrt.v24-16968_NEWD-2_K2.6_mini_e1000v2.bin' and is downloadable here, as Slider said.

As of today, Amazon has the E-1000 refurbished for $24.99, a great price for someone who needs a cheap router fast.



Also, sorry that I used the word 'micro' instead of 'mini.'

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 15:57 on Dec 1, 2011

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


As was discussed earlier, 5 GHz doesn't penetrate walls as well as 2.4 GHz. Maybe just a really good 2.4 GHz if you can't find a way to run Cat 6 cable through / around this 'wall mass'

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Raffles posted:


My house is tall and thin. The router is on the ground floor connected through an Ethernet cable to my Apple TV. It streams SD TV and HD films from my Mac Pro on the floor above. Streaming speeds are okay but if I want to stream something to a laptop or iPad then it can't really cope.

Are there any recommendations for an ADSL router/modem preferably for under £50?

If you already have a Mac Pro, AppleTV, and an iPad then why don't you have a current generation Airport Extreme already? It could serve up all of those machines without breaking a sweat. What speeds are you getting from your ISP, 5 Mb/sec or better?

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Sharrow posted:

Since we have N devices and they get reasonable signal, should we run the Extreme in split B/G and N mode and join the N devices to them separately, or does that not make much difference? (We also have like 30 detectable networks nearby, 95% of which are 2.4GHz.)

Definitely do the split b/g - n mode, you'll see a huge difference with the N-capable devices, especially if they are recent Apple-made devices (manufactured later than early 2009.) Hook up the N-capable devices to the N-only network and they'll run internet stuff a lot snappier.

quote:

Is it worth putting the Extreme in the same room as the modem, bridging it, and using that as the router instead?

Depends on the make of the combo modem/router. If I were you, I'd try using the AEBS as the router for a while and see how well it performs vs. the vendor-supplied router. Also, be careful if the modem/router's also being used to provide video services, those may depend on the m/r acting as the main routing device.

Also, bear in mind that 5 GHz doesn't penetrate walls as well as 2.4 GHz, so if moving the AEBS next to the modem/router puts more walls between your wireless device and the AEBS, things might get slower.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 23:53 on Dec 5, 2011

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


NOTinuyasha posted:

You might actually be right about that, I thought Buffalo's line of DD-WRT preloaded routers was something that came around the last ~2 years, but apparently the G300N has been around for much longer then that deal.

Buffalo started prepackaging DD-WRT in the G300N in the latter half of 2010.

Lots of popular routers keep the same model name and number because the vendors rely on that as marketing. If a certain router is known to be popular, they'll keep selling that same model number but add 'revisions' to it, like they did to the Linksys WRT54G.

WRT54Gs started out in 2002 with removable / changeable antennas, lots of flash and regular RAM, and up until rev 4.0 was a great router that could take the full version of DD-WRT and was easy to flash.

Revision 5.0 they inexplicably halved both the flash and regular RAM, and they kept making it shitter (probably wanted more profit in exchange for crappy parts)

By its last revision, v.8.2, released in 2007, it had fixed non removeable antennas, poo poo flash RAM and regular RAM, and could only accept a modified DD-WRT micro version, which can only be installed after going through many more steps than the regular flash.

WRT54GLs are just clones of the last known good WRT54G revision 4.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 23:11 on Dec 18, 2011

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


You DID see the messages that most combination modem/routers are uniformly terrible, right?

And that you are better off getting best of class in each category, right?

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Rhino Steve posted:

As for Wireless routers, I had another shot at reading the OP, and still have no idea. What I do know, is I would have no idea how to flash the router with new software. So I really just need something out the box that'll do the job for me.

Well, do you know if you have a lot of competing access points all around you? You can download iStumbler and see; if there's more than three and they're all 802.11 b/g, then maybe you want to get an 802.11N wireless router; the Netgear 3700 mentioned in the OP is pretty capable and it's dual band, and you should be able to use it OOTB; your MacBook Pro (if bought within the past three years) should use the 5 GHz network just fine and the Playstation 3 can go on the 2.4 GHz network.

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Dunno, what model AEBS? There's four generations not including the newest which is the fifth;

Which firmware? What are you using to connect with, a Windows machine?

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Cisco is selling refurbed E4200's which are very likely v1s for $99.

The E4200 v2 was only announced back in December so not everyone may have stock yet.

The reason that it'll never be DD-WRT / Tomato compatible is because Cisco decided to switch from a Broadcom CPU to a Marvell CPU.

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Prefect Six posted:

The WNDR4500 does have a broadcom chip though, right? So eventually it should be supported by dd-wrt or tomato?

Yes, it does have a BCM4706 running at 600 MHz. DD-WRT status on this router is "Work In Progress" so take that as you will.

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


sharkytm posted:

A note worth mentioning. Linksys/Cisco is shipping V2 units in V1 boxes. I know, I just got one from Newegg. You can tell the difference between the two by looking at the serial numbers. I know, I just drove to BestBuy and bought a V1. I'll return the V2 tomorrow. Linksys is loving OpenSource.1

Linksys / Cisco truly doesn't give a poo poo or warn anybody when they decide to change their hardware. It's like with the WRT54G, suddenly after v4.0 they went from 16 MB RAM and 4 MB flash RAM to a paltry 8 MB RAM and 2 MB flash RAM with hardware v.5.0, forcing DD-WRT to create micro versions that could fit into the 2 MB flash space.

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


CuddleChunks posted:

They did release a beefy version a couple years ago - WRT54GL - so you can easily install third party firmwares.

Yeah, it's just a rebranded WRT54G v4. 16 MB RAM, 4 GB Flash.

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Swastikaman posted:

Linksys E3000 is on sale on Newegg for $80 bucks, instead of $180. Pretty good deal.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833124388

Great deal, but every other review says they heat up a lot. Nothing a Dremel can't fix, though. Maybe Linksys dropped a hint to the distributors that they're either EOLing this or getting ready to rev the hardware like they did with the 4300.

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Prefect Six posted:

Is the surfboard docsis 3.0 worth it? What questions should I ask my ISP to find out if it's compatible?

Uh, just ask them if they support DOCSIS 3.0 modems or speeds above 15 Mbit?

If your ISP doesn't offer DOCSIS 3.0 modems to begin with, it's not worth getting, unless they specifically state their cable system will be offering DOCSIS 3.0 compliance (multiple channel bonding) in the future.

My ISP, Optimum Online, requires DOCSIS 3.0 modems to be installed before you can ask for Optimum Boost Plus, which gives you 50 Mbit down / 8 Mbit up and the ability to do your own web hosting at home.

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


There ought to be a note in the OP about ancedotal evidence warning that some Linksys models tend to overheat (like the E3000.)

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


While we're at it, I'd like to nominate the Asus WL-520 GU for inclusion in the list of under $50 routers.

The price at NewEgg is $42.95 and there's a $10 rebate currently going on to bring it to $32.95 total cost. It has DD-WRT and Tomato support and I've installed it for several clients upstate and they've said it's been rock solid; one unit's still running Tomato 1.27 and there's never been a need to update it.

Yeah, it's only 2.4 GHz but for $33 it's an absolute steal. It also has a USB port for printers and actually has two antennas, one is the larger 5 dB detachable/upgradeable antenna, the other is an internal chip antenna, under Tomato you can select which one is transmit and which is receive.

This actually used to get mentioned regularly in Calculon's old thread, but I guess since it's G only it's passe. But if you live in an unsaturated area for wireless this is a great router.

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Also, you should update the info on the Airport Extreme thusly:

Airport Extreme 5th Generation
NOT DD-WRT OR TOMATO COMPATIBLE, 128 MB RAM, 16 MB flash, Marvell 88F6281 1.2 GHz processor, simultaneous dual band radio, Gigabit Ethernet

All the specs were revealed in this AnandTech takeapart. True, they're not official, especially since Apple never really publicizes their components, but I'd trust them.

Edit: Hmm, 1.2 GHz? No wonder it does well with multiple clients. Also there is separate radio hardware for each band, so no wonder it can do dual band without slowing down.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 21:17 on May 21, 2012

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Naffer posted:

I was really thinking about buying the E3000 because it's a pretty nice router for the price. Is it worth buying and mounting it vertically or installing a little fan near it?

I'd get a Dremel and just saw / cut cooling holes in the casing, then get a dopey little $5 desktop fan at WalMart or HomeDepot and point it at the thing. I had to do the same thing for my WRT54G v4 after I overclocked it.

Whoever does thermal design at Cisco for the commodity routers must have gotten the job via nepotism. Either that, or since they need to make money somewhere, they just sunk zero dollars into designing the case. "Hey, you mopping the floor there! Where should we put cooling holes in our case and how big should they be? Really? Okay."

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 19:33 on May 21, 2012

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


diehlr posted:

Jesus christ. I knew the hardware in those things was good, but those specifications are better than I expected! I might be ordering a Time Capsule soon.

There ought to be a Time Capsule entry as well, which should look like this:


Apple Time Capsule
NOT DD-WRT OR TOMATO COMPATIBLE, 256 MB RAM, 16 MB flash, Marvell 88F6281 1.5 GHz processor, simultaneous dual band radio, Gigabit Ethernet, USB print server, internal 2 / 3 TB HD storage, $299/$499


Yes, the Time Capsule actually comes with twice the RAM of the AEBS. The AEBS has the same USB print server capability as the TC as well. You can also add a USB drive if you plug a USB hub into the AEBS or the TC and have an external drive and printer connected simultaneously.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 04:15 on May 23, 2012

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Probably more like the SB6121, it's a smidge faster than the SurfBoard EXtreme 6120. Also it's IP v6 ready if you're at that level.

Amazon link here.

Be advised that you may only enjoy extra speed if your cable company supports DOCSIS 3.0 and will allow this modem to employ it.

Here's something from one of the reviews on Amazon that might help you if you're trying to hook this up to a Comcast line:

some guy on Amazon posted:

Out of nowhere, I was having excruciatingly slow internet speed on Comcast. The Comcast tech advised that my Motorola SB 4100 was at the "end of life" and that I should upgrade. Skeptical, I purchased this modem which is a DOCSIS 3.0 (and backwards compatible) modem. It worked. I went from a 2mbps download speed to over 17mbps. What a difference.

There was one installation glitch that you need to be aware of. When you hook up the modem (connect the coax cable, connect the ethernet cable, and plug it in, that's it), and then try to get online, it will direct you to a Comcast self-activation screen (no other site is available). After entering my account number and phone number and hitting the "next" button, I got a blank screen, and nothing happens.

So I called Comcast and they said that usually happens if you are doing an upgrade; it mostly works only for a new service connection. However, it is a simple matter to give the tech your MAC address and the serial number. After about 5 minutes, while he stayed on the line, it came alive, no problem.

BUT, here's the thing: the serial number they need is the CUSTOMER serial number. This is only found on the bottom of the Motorola box the modem came in. This is different from the "S/N" serial number that is on the label that is on the instruction sheet and on the bottom of the modem itself. The customer S/N has letters in it; the regular S/N has only numbers in it and is too long. My first Comcast tech didn't know that and it took a day to sort it out.

Other than that, it works well with my iMac and Apple Airport Extreme Base wireless router. Enjoy

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 23:03 on Jun 4, 2012

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Triikan posted:

Citation? I only ask because the last number in Motorola devices have always been revisions, with no meaningful spec changes.

Sorry, I was going by the Amazon reviews, Amazon says the SB6120 tops out at 150 Mbps, the 6121 at 160 Mbps, but according to the PDF spec sheets from Motorola, the specs are identical except the 6121 is slightly more compact. Some of the Amazon reviews say it runs hotter because of this.

There's only this on the 6121 spec sheet:

Motorola posted:

Updated SB6120 with sleeker enclosure and the following features:

Power Saving Energy Conservation Switch allows user to disable the modem when not in use (optional feature)

Internal Low Pass Filter to eliminate MoCA signal overload

The switch sounds useless, why not just unplug it.. the other feature as far as I can tell only comes into play if you have lots of devices on the same cable, like multiple DVRs and box sets

Edit: Bet they made it smaller because they would save .05445378 cents per unit by switching to a smaller case.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 23:30 on Jun 4, 2012

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Is the adapter hooked up to a 5 GHz network as defined in the Airport Utility?

What make is your adapter? It might be a Ralink chip, sometimes Ralink and Broadcom don't get along too well in my anecdotal experience.

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


You also might want to start a "under $200" and a "Richie Rich" segment as the Airport Extreme Base Station retails for $179 and the Time Capsule's at least $299.

As mentioned earlier in the thread, the Motorola SURFBoard SB6120 might be a better recommendation over the SB6121 because the latter is smaller and runs hotter, which might affect the longevity of the unit.

The other thing to watch for is that some providers only furnish certain makes and models of modems and take a dim view of you substituting with something else.

For example, Verizon FIOS is still only providing and supporting ActionTech and Westell routers. A friend of mine just got it in her area and they gave her an MI424WR revision I router. ActionTechs were infamous for having teensy weeny NAT tables before, only 7.5K entries possible in revisions A-D of their router. Current revisions such as the G and I have 100-200K tables, somewhat more reasonable.

Optimum Online provides several different Motorola SB models, some data only, some VOIP capable, as well as one made by Arris, models are differentiated by what services the user subscribes to. I know that the Arris model auto links to a sign on page that can only be used to activate the modem if you are an authorized OO technician.

I used to have heat issues with the Arris (which is a DOCSIS 3.0 model, TM series I believe) where it would shut down/reboot randomly, but ever since I pointed a 4" USB fan at it it hasn't happened since.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 21:22 on Jun 7, 2012

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Devian666 posted:

Some routers are getting a bit better in terms of heat but modems seem to be an ongoing problem. I've got a combo modem/router/wireless unit that runs hot even with the filtering and wireless switched off, but it still seems to be working. I guess it's something we'll have to tolerate for the foreseeable future.

Don't forget that Verizon and other providers contract out their supply of hardware to vendors that design modems to satisfy 'lowest bid' requirements, not user performance, which is how you get combo modem/routers that are overwhelmed simply by running torrent software.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 02:25 on Jun 8, 2012

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


Probably because it's a special model made under contract by Motorola for TWC.

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


I'm beginning to wonder if the vendors make the modem/routers poo poo on purpose.

The whole Actiontech scandal of having a tiny NAT table would only matter to people running torrents or accessing multiple game servers.

For general surfing and email it's fine. It was only corrected after a majority of people bitched about it and it threatened to give FIOS a 'gotcha' over cable.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 02:07 on Jun 9, 2012

Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


I dunno, try giving your PS3 a ridiculously high static IP like 10.0.1.253? That always worked for my Canon MG6120 wireless printer.

The Apple devices will more or less want to stay down in the lower boonies.

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Binary Badger
Oct 11, 2005

Trolling Link for a decade


The 802.11n Airport Express isn't half bad, although they ganked USB based file services, it only does USB printer sharing.

Since it's $99, it ought to be in the under $99 category.

Apple continues to use etched chip-based antennas in their routers, guess they'd never go for those rubber ducky 5 dB antennas.

Devian666, here's something you can add to the OP when you get a chance:

Airport Express (2nd Generation)
NOT DD-WRT OR TOMATO COMPATIBLE, 64 MB RAM, 16 MB flash, Qualcomm Atheros AR9344 @ 600 MHz processor, simultaneous dual band radio, 2X2 MIMO, two 10/100 Mb Ethernet ports, USB print server, Apple Airplay speaker streaming, $99


(don't include below text)

The 16 MB flash is conjecture as there's no mention of it in the article, but since it appears to use the same proprietary Apple firmware v.7.6.2 that the Extreme does, I'd be willing to bet it's the same.

I'm also willing to bet Apple's running the AR9344 at the top speed of 600 MHz (chip specs say it can run from 533 to 600 MHz) since its routing performance was remarked to be pretty good.

Edit: if you want to see a comparison in network throughput between the new Express and the current 5th Gen. Extreme, look here. Test machine was an HP laptop, FWIW.

Binary Badger fucked around with this message at 16:32 on Jul 8, 2012

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