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signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


Jose posted:

What beer do people recommend? I used guinness last time because its what I normally use in beef stew and really like it but I'm open to suggestion

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djnkro
Sep 16, 2007


As far as cooking with beer goes. Don't ever cook with something you would not drink.
I like to use something dark, kinda sweet, and hoppy. So some Young's Double Chocolate Stout would be great.

Also, perhaps it's just my own superstition, but I find that chili is better reheated. Cook it, let it cool, hit the fridge, then re-heat it. I swear it tastes better.

Cooking up a batch tonight for Frito Pie. I know it's ghetto, but drat is it good.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


djnkro posted:

As far as cooking with beer goes. Don't ever cook with something you would not drink

I don't like this quote at all because I wouldn't drink rauchbier straight up but it adds a nice flavor to meat. I also wouldn't drink apple cider vinegar, but I'd cook with it. There are tons of things I would cook with but would never eat or drink straight up.

Nevvy Z
Jan 3, 2004



My friend swears by this recipe as a chili starting point.

http://dc.wikia.com/wiki/Green_Arrow's_Chili

Cluricaun
Jul 31, 2009

Bang.


I've got a nice batch of chili waiting for me at home that I made last night in the slow cooker while I slept. This allows a more precise timing for me as I never know when I get to leave work and this batch went into the big crock that doesn't have a timer on it. It also gives everything all day to mingle and allows for easier fat level controls.

The biggest improvement here is that I have repurposed my never used coffee grinder into a spice grinder and so I was able to buy a shitload of cumin seeds for a buck at the local grocer and use fresh ground cumin instead of powdered dirt. The difference was immediately noticeable throughout the process and I'm damned exited about it.

I started with a 3lb eye of round roast that I cubed, salted, and dusted with paprika so the fat could do it's thing with the paprika and then I lamely grilled the cubes on my grill pan just enough to get a nice char on them and tossed these in the crock.

I then added.......

1 can chipotles in adobo that got stick blended so there's no whole chipotle surprise later on

1 giant can of whole peeled San Marzano tomatoes, I think 500 or 800 grams (I don't speak metric well)

Three cloves of garlic, smashed

A diced jalapeno

A diced medium yellow onion

A diced ancient pepper, which are these giant gnarly looking peppers that sell at the local grocer, but aren't hot at all, they're like red bell peppers from hell

Red pepper flakes to my satisfaction

Fresh cumin to my satisfaction (note: do not take a giant sniff out of your fresh ground cumin because you're excited about your newly repurposed toy, you will sneeze a lot and your mouth tastes like you've been put in a headlock by a Chicago cab driver)

A dash of liquid smoke,

A pinch on cinnamon

1 can of generic store brand chili beans because I don't really care about beans

Enough PBR that I didn't think the liquid content was out of control, around half a can. I didn't have any fancy beer on hand, but I drink it and I think it works fine in chili too. I always add it last so that I don't add too much.

I put that on low for 8 hours while I slept and then tossed in a good shake of masa flour this morning to get things nice and smooth. I stirred everyting up and unplugged the pot and lifted out the crock, went and got ready and then popped that bad boy in the fridge after it had cooled on the counter. All I need to do when I get home is throw the crock back in the pot on high to reheat and make jalapeno cheddar corn bread and it's going to be glorious dinner time.

DekeThornton
Sep 2, 2011

Be friends!


Jose posted:

What beer do people recommend? I used guinness last time because its what I normally use in beef stew and really like it but I'm open to suggestion

I've used porter, with satisfactory results.

Jose
Jul 24, 2007



So due to restrictions I don't have any fresh chili's for what I'm making on saturday. I have chili powder made from Ancho/Guajillo/De Arbol/Chipotle. Will rehydrating them and blending them change the taste at all or add anything that just making them into chili powder wouldn't?

bolo yeung
Apr 22, 2010


For beer, I like to use something malty and caramel-ly. As someone here posted, I find it preferable to get bitterness from my toasted chiles. Something like a non-hoppy brown ale or dunkel lager is what I'd go for.

Also, instead of making my own chile powder, I just toast my chiles then throw them into the simmering cooking liquid to soften up and then blend them. Also, roasting tomatoes on a comal or dry skillet, removing the charred skin from the tomatoes and blending the skin with the chiles is nice (and chopping up said roasted tomatoes and throwing them in with the beer/beef broth).

the42ndtourist
Sep 6, 2004

A half-dead thing in the stark, dead world, clean mad for the muck called gold

WombatCyborg posted:

Anybody have a good idea for meat substitutes that work well in chili for us vegetarian goons? I want to taste a good chili in my life at some point haha.

Tofu can work pretty well. I used some in a chili last week for a vegetarian friend. I've worked myself into a place where I make a chili that sits somewhere in between the meat-and-gravy texas chili and the beans-in-tomato-sauce chili.


Used extra firm, cut into ~1-1.5cm cubes, marinated overnight in soy sauce, a bit of cider vinegar, cumin, coriander, garlic, oregano, salt, pepper, with a serrano cut up in there as well. Fry that up so the sides get all golden and crunchy - like you're browning the meat - before you toss it in the pot. It'll lose the crunchiness in the chili, but the flavours will stick around.

Other things in there:
veg stock
beer (this was a homebrewed English standard bitter, as that's what I had on tap)
1 tin diced tomatoes - liquid drained off
mushrooms - browned/caramelized/whatever the term is...
red bell peppers
onions - caramelized
garlic
cumin, coriander, oregano, mustard seed, fennel seed, spanish paprika
fresh serrano peppers, ground chipotle
a couple pinches of flour, added early, as I only had about half the time for simmering that I wanted for it to thicken up.

All amounts to taste, and cook for a good long time. Just don't forget to brown or caramelize everything you can because you need to make up for the lost flavour depth from the meat. Mine ended up pretty tasty.

barbudo
Nov 8, 2010
WHO VOLUNTARILY GOES DAYS WITHOUT A SHOWER FOR NO REASON? DIS GUY

PLEASE SHOWER YOU GROSS FUCK


Oh man. It's so great to see all you guys again. I've got a thing I'm working on and when I get a decent camera I'll show you guys. I can't wait.

e: for content

Jose posted:

What beer do people recommend? I used guinness last time because its what I normally use in beef stew and really like it but I'm open to suggestion
I like to use a dark, thick, juicy English Porter. I tried an IPA once, because they're fashionable now and everything, but the whole chili just tasted like an IPA. Maybe I was doing something wrong though.

barbudo fucked around with this message at Dec 2, 2011 around 03:14

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004


barbudo posted:

I like to use a dark, thick, juicy English Porter. I tried an IPA once, because they're fashionable now and everything, but the whole chili just tasted like an IPA. Maybe I was doing something wrong though.

no, it's just wrong to put an IPA in chili. chilis themselves have more than enough bitterness, you don't need to add harsh hoppy bitter notes to your finished product - at least not en masse. low ibu beer only, in my book.

angerbeet
Mar 23, 2004


plob


I used a 1/2 bottle of Péché Mortel from Dieu De Ciel in the last batch of chili I made. It's a 9.5% imperial coffee stout, and the coffee really added to the earthiness of the chili without it being overly bitter.

And then I drank the others.

crazyfish
Sep 19, 2002



I typically use a porter in my chili, though if I don't have any laying around I'll toss in a couple shots of tequila or whiskey.

anime was right
Jun 27, 2008

death is certain
keep yr cool


My chili recipe is loosely based off of Alton Brown's. I always think there's room for improvement (of course people can get into decade long arguments over chili too sooo) but it does me well, feel free to rip it to shreds.

2.5 pounds stew meat
1 large onion, finely chopped
1 tablespoon olive oil
12 oz of apple cider (no one in my family will TOUCH alcohol, can't use beer here).
1 can beef broth
1 tablespoon corn starch
2 chipotle peppers chopped
1 can tomato paste
1.5 tablespoons chili powder
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 lime worth of juice


salt to taste. sear meat, sweat onions, pour all that poo poo together (obviously not the corn starch directly), let it simmer for like 6 hours, eat.

The lime really does it for me.

anime was right fucked around with this message at Dec 2, 2011 around 13:46

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


Jose posted:

So due to restrictions I don't have any fresh chili's for what I'm making on saturday. I have chili powder made from Ancho/Guajillo/De Arbol/Chipotle. Will rehydrating them and blending them change the taste at all or add anything that just making them into chili powder wouldn't?

Yeah you would have little strips of dried chili in there that are all chewy. Don't worry about having big chunks of chiles in there man, if you cook it long enough all the fresh chiles you would have are going to disintegrate.

If you can still have canned chiles, those are fine. Not the same, but I'm not even all that opposed to using a small can of Rotel. Use some chipotles in adobo if you can (not a lot until you know what you're in for).

wheez the roux
Aug 2, 2004
THEY SHOULD'VE GIVEN IT TO LYNCH

Death to the Seahawks. Death to Seahawks posters.

when it comes to beer for your chile, there are two options:



or



in terms of hard liquor there's nothing wrong with any decent tequila or even a dark rum

Humboldt Squid
Jan 21, 2006



Jose posted:

So due to restrictions I don't have any fresh chili's for what I'm making on saturday. I have chili powder made from Ancho/Guajillo/De Arbol/Chipotle. Will rehydrating them and blending them change the taste at all or add anything that just making them into chili powder wouldn't?

When I use dry chillies, I cut them into strips with a pair of scissors, then rehydrate them in a deep walled vessel. Then I hit them with immersion blender to make a pepper smoothie. That's really the best way to go about it, I think.

barbudo
Nov 8, 2010
WHO VOLUNTARILY GOES DAYS WITHOUT A SHOWER FOR NO REASON? DIS GUY

PLEASE SHOWER YOU GROSS FUCK


Humboldt squid posted:

When I use dry chillies, I cut them into strips with a pair of scissors, then rehydrate them in a deep walled vessel. Then I hit them with immersion blender to make a pepper smoothie. That's really the best way to go about it, I think.
I like to go half and half with my chilies: half fresh, half dried. I toast the dried ones with some cumin seed.

Darth Goku Jr
Oct 19, 2004

yes yes i see, i understand


signalnoise posted:

I don't like this quote at all because I wouldn't drink rauchbier straight up but it adds a nice flavor to meat. I also wouldn't drink apple cider vinegar, but I'd cook with it. There are tons of things I would cook with but would never eat or drink straight up.

Really? Rauchbiers make a nice rich drink on their own. I mean give me only one or two a month but still. They truly are great for any slow cooked meat though.

.and I think he meant only, you know, fully formed beverages meant for consumption, as opposed to cooking wine or using the cheapest swill possible you wouldn't ever drink.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


Darth Goku Jr posted:

Really? Rauchbiers make a nice rich drink on their own. I mean give me only one or two a month but still. They truly are great for any slow cooked meat though.

.and I think he meant only, you know, fully formed beverages meant for consumption, as opposed to cooking wine or using the cheapest swill possible you wouldn't ever drink.

If that's what he meant, that's cool and all, but that suggestion has really become a quotable that has gotten a lot of people I have talked to taking it the other way.


Also I knew about the existence of the chipotle ale and never though to use it in chili, so now I'm having a

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

you wanna join my
primitive noise band?


The only thing that goes in my chili colorado is



BANQUET BEER

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004


SYFY HYPHY posted:

The only thing that goes in my chili colorado is



BANQUET BEER

i find that a splash of coors really helps round out the bitterness of a chili and aid in its digestibility, so I always add a splash of coorst

Don Corleone
Jan 25, 2004

What's next?

As much as it pains me to recommend anything by Bobby Flay, I've been using/modifying this lamb chili recipe for years now and have yet to meet someone who doesn't love it. The real key is the cumin-lime sour cream as a topping.

My main modifications:
1. I tend to use at least half beef (usually a brisket/chuck mix), if not all beef in place of the lamb
2. Less stock and/or more time. The recipe says simmer for an hour. I usually go at least two, or cut down on the stock by 25% if in a hurry. The result is too watery otherwise.
3. It says 1 Tbsp chipotle puree. I say that's fine if you're only making a quarter-batch.


quote:

Ingredients
1/4 cup olive oil
2 1/2 pounds lamb from shoulder, boned and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 1/2 large Spanish onions, finely diced
6 cloves garlic, finely chopped
1 (15-ounce) can whole tomatoes, drained and pureed
1 tablespoon chipotle puree
3 tablespoons ancho chili powder
1 tablespoon pasilla chili powder
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 teaspoons ground coriander
1 tablespoon dried Mexican oregano
5 cups chicken stock
1 (12-ounce) bottle dark beer
Dash ground cinnamon
1 to 2 tablespoons honey
2 cups cooked or canned black beans
Chopped cilantro leaves, for garnish
Cumin Crema, recipe follows
Avocado Relish, recipe follows
Red Onion Relish, recipe follows
Fry Bread, recipe follows
Directions
Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over high heat. Add the lamb, in batches, season with salt and pepper, and cook until seared and browned on all sides. Remove the lamb to a plate with a slotted spoon.

Add the onion to the pan and cook until soft. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add the tomatoes, chipotle, and spices. Return the lamb to the pan, add the stock and beer; cover and cook at a simmer for over medium heat, about 1 hour, or until the lamb is tender and the mixture has thickened. After 30 minutes, check seasoning and add honey. During the last 15 minutes, add the cinnamon and cooked beans. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Sprinkle with chopped cilantro. Ladle into bowls and top with a large dollop of Cumin Crema, Avocado Relish, and Red Onion Relish. Serve with fry bread on the side.

Cumin Crema:
1 pint creme fraiche, Mexican crema or sour cream
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Whisk together ingredients in a bowl. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour before serving.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/...cipe/index.html

Cranberry Jam
Apr 8, 2011


signalnoise posted:



Rauchbier and Stone Smoked Porter are my beers of choice for chili.

I'll have to try that chipotle ale next time I want to make chili that looks really good.

milquetoast child
Jun 27, 2003

literally


For a 1 year remembrance of Slay, I cooked his version of chili (this includes browning each steak cube on all 6 sides, almost ducasse style, flouring them all first), but I also added 2 table spoons of homemade ground/cracked szechuan peppercorns to the end.

That may have been a grievous error because while it's about as spicy as normal, my entire mouth is numb and even my lips.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


I've been wondering if I should try and make chili using pork ribs, is this just a crazy idea? There's a store here that sells some nice (already cooked, made then and there) ribs, been thinking what if I just chuck this in, with bones and all?

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


His Divine Shadow posted:

I've been wondering if I should try and make chili using pork ribs, is this just a crazy idea? There's a store here that sells some nice (already cooked, made then and there) ribs, been thinking what if I just chuck this in, with bones and all?

Chili aspic

ProtoKaiser
Feb 27, 2005

Hello, IT. Have you tried turning it off and on again?

Iron Leg posted:

God drat delicious recipe.

I made this 2 nights ago, and holy poo poo is it amazing. I didn't use as much cilantro, and a lot more meat. I'll be munching on this for a while.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


signalnoise posted:

Chili aspic

I'm not sure if that's a good or bad thing, to be honest.

Casu Marzu
Oct 20, 2008



His Divine Shadow posted:

I'm not sure if that's a good or bad thing, to be honest.

Best thing.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

you wanna join my
primitive noise band?


signalnoise posted:

Chili aspic

aspichili



for reference, smoked ham hocks, ox tails, beef heart and such

YEAH DOG fucked around with this message at Dec 9, 2011 around 08:29

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004


it occurs to me that good chili is basically a heavily seasoned deconstructed country style terrine...

Bob Morales
Aug 18, 2006

This post is good to go


WombatCyborg posted:

Anybody have a good idea for meat substitutes that work well in chili for us vegetarian goons? I want to taste a good chili in my life at some point haha.

Tofu works.



Solus posted:

Anyone got a good mid-west style recipe for cheap students looking to feed themselves without spending a lot of money

Just dump a bunch of chili-type ingredients in a pot and cook it. For the above I sauted some chopped green bell pepper and onions, then put in a couple cans of beans, tomatoes, couple spoons of chili powder, and a big handful of chopped jalepenos. Salt+pepper to taste, add whatever else you want, corn, hominy, whatever. Let it simmer for at least an hour.

Of course, brown some hamburger then toss it in there if you don't want tofu.

Humboldt Squid
Jan 21, 2006



You can also just not add beef and use vegetable stock. I usually make a vegetarian version when I make chili, I just don't add any meat or beef stock to one of the pots.

ascii genitals
Aug 19, 2000



Neese's sausage and stew meat. Neese's is probably only available in NC/SC/VA/GA. Ground turkey is also delicious.

In some of the oil cook two roughly chopped onions and 2 bell peppers. After a few minutes add some chopped up chilis (including seeds)--some jalapenos, poblanos, seranos, anaheim, thai whatever you have. Some roasted some fresh.
Add lots of crushed and stewed tomatoes (maybe 2-3 big cans or 5-8 small cans). Cook low and slow for quite some time, chili holds on to a ton of heat so you don't want to heat it too quickly or you may burn it.)
3 cans of chili beans (added half way).

Add lots of chili powder, cumin, oregano, ground mustard. Beer is also good, something stout. A bit of dark chocolate is also good. Garnish with a bit of sour cream, cheddar, and saltines.


(not mine but it looks like it)

ascii genitals fucked around with this message at Dec 10, 2011 around 01:14

Heres Hank
Oct 20, 2008


Thank god we haven't seen any of it in this thread yet, but I'm baffled how many people I know make their chili with Tabasco sauce. If you want your chili to be hotter, the staple of the dish is chili peppers. Just add more, and bam! You get that heat without all of the gross sour vinegar taste.

Really, using Tabasco to make chili is like using ketchup to make marinara.

AriTheDog
Jul 29, 2003
Famously tasty.

Heres Hank posted:

Thank god we haven't seen any of it in this thread yet, but I'm baffled how many people I know make their chili with Tabasco sauce. If you want your chili to be hotter, the staple of the dish is chili peppers. Just add more, and bam! You get that heat without all of the gross sour vinegar taste.

Really, using Tabasco to make chili is like using ketchup to make marinara.

The point of using Tabasco isn't to get chile pepper flavor, it's to add the complex smokey flavor that Tabasco has from being aged in old bourbon barrels. Personally, I think it's a great addition to a chili made from a variety of dried chilis as well, and far better than adding liquid smoke, which to me is truly disgusting.

Also, what's the issue with acidity? Unless you're using a ton, it should be hard to detect underneath all the tomatoes most recipes call for.

Heres Hank
Oct 20, 2008


"Complex smoky flavor"? You can add a splash of bourbon for that exact same effect, which gives you plenty of smokiness with a sweeter flavor and the acidity you're looking for, without putting even a trace of sour vinegary flavoring into it. Tabasco is just red pepper, water, salt, and vinegar. There's nothing in there that you can't do better with real ingredients.

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

Tobasco...why not just add it when you serve the chili?

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signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


Heres Hank posted:

Thank god we haven't seen any of it in this thread yet, but I'm baffled how many people I know make their chili with Tabasco sauce. If you want your chili to be hotter, the staple of the dish is chili peppers. Just add more, and bam! You get that heat without all of the gross sour vinegar taste.

IMO you should be just using a shitload of chiles

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