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Kedzie
Dec 13, 2004

they all float down here

I grilled up two NY strips and a pile of pork stew meat, and added that to the chili pot last night. Goddamn, that was good chili.

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His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


OK so ribs in Chili, that turned out real well, along with ordinary stewing meat. Flash was on so it looks a bit shiny:



Also I put beans in, sorry to any purists but I do love beans.

angerbeet
Mar 23, 2004


plob


It's good to love a bean.

SatoshiMiwa
May 6, 2007



Not sure if White Chicken Chili counts for this thread, but made it up using Fresh Anaheim, Jalapeno, and Poblano peppers. It tastes pretty awesome and I'm a fool for not using fresh Chili peppers before this.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

you wanna join my
primitive noise band?


Yo, yo poo poo probably ain't chilil. Stop being terrible and asking about it.

Here's some real advice: half the point of simmering a chili is to mellow out the alcohol. Sous vide'ing the chili means that the beer has nowhere to go and is pretty much terrible. However, the meat was the best texture ever. If you're going to sv a chili, cook the meat sv, and the sauce of the stovetop.

His Divine Shadow
Aug 7, 2000

I'm not a fascist. I'm a priest. Fascists dress up in black and tell people what to do.


Who are you talking to?

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


SYFY HYPHY posted:

Yo, yo poo poo probably ain't chilil. Stop being terrible and asking about it.

Here's some real advice: half the point of simmering a chili is to mellow out the alcohol. Sous vide'ing the chili means that the beer has nowhere to go and is pretty much terrible. However, the meat was the best texture ever. If you're going to sv a chili, cook the meat sv, and the sauce of the stovetop.

Thanks for this, btw what is your favorite temperature for a chili? I like about like 55

barbudo
Nov 8, 2010
WHO VOLUNTARILY GOES DAYS WITHOUT A SHOWER FOR NO REASON? DIS GUY

PLEASE SHOWER YOU GROSS FUCK


for new year's eve dinner tonight i'm making my usual chili, a recipe that has been kicking back and forth between me and a friend, getting better every time. usually we use chorizo and flank steak, with fresh tomatoes (peeled and de-seeded), garlic, onion, and bell peppers, simmered with a pint of English porter, adobo peppers, a homemade dry chili powder, and a blend of as many fresh hot peppers as our local Mexican grocer has in stock (this blend usually ends up a beautiful bright-green liquid - take one deep sniff of this stuff and your whole upper respiratory system will empty its contents). Anyway my dilemma now is that I want to move away from the flank steak, but I only have about 8 hours to get it done, so I need to get moving. what kind of meat would you guys recommend? How do I incorporate it?

AriTheDog
Jul 29, 2003
Famously tasty.

barbudo posted:

for new year's eve dinner tonight i'm making my usual chili, a recipe that has been kicking back and forth between me and a friend, getting better every time. usually we use chorizo and flank steak, with fresh tomatoes (peeled and de-seeded), garlic, onion, and bell peppers, simmered with a pint of English porter, adobo peppers, a homemade dry chili powder, and a blend of as many fresh hot peppers as our local Mexican grocer has in stock (this blend usually ends up a beautiful bright-green liquid - take one deep sniff of this stuff and your whole upper respiratory system will empty its contents). Anyway my dilemma now is that I want to move away from the flank steak, but I only have about 8 hours to get it done, so I need to get moving. what kind of meat would you guys recommend? How do I incorporate it?

This is probably too late, but chuck is the best thing to use. Cut it in 3/4"-1" chunks, cook it a very long time, until it's falling apart.

barbudo
Nov 8, 2010
WHO VOLUNTARILY GOES DAYS WITHOUT A SHOWER FOR NO REASON? DIS GUY

PLEASE SHOWER YOU GROSS FUCK


I just cut the flank steak really really fine this time because I couldn't get chuck from my mexican butcher - they have mostly pork - and didn't have time to go to the megamart. It fell apart pretty nicely.

AriTheDog
Jul 29, 2003
Famously tasty.

Pork shoulder would probably be pretty great too, for next time. Same idea as with the chuck.

ChuckDHead
Dec 18, 2006

Better than expected.


UK chili thread goons who haven't already seen it might want to catch How To Cook Like Heston on 4OD. Tonight's episode was all about beef, and featured his take on Chili Con Carne. While I imagine that most viewers would have found the fact that the smokey quality was gained in part from serving it in a pot inside a bowl of woodchips that you set on fire with a blowtorch, the biggest surprise to me was that he actually used regular minced beef for it.

woofay
Dec 12, 2011


ChuckDHead posted:

UK chili thread goons who haven't already seen it might want to catch How To Cook Like Heston on 4OD. Tonight's episode was all about beef, and featured his take on Chili Con Carne. While I imagine that most viewers would have found the fact that the smokey quality was gained in part from serving it in a pot inside a bowl of woodchips that you set on fire with a blowtorch, the biggest surprise to me was that he actually used regular minced beef for it.
the look of that chilli makes my stomach scream with desire. I wish I wasn't on a post Xmas diet.

forbidden dialectics
Jul 26, 2005



So I recently spent several weeks in New Mexico and was smitten by "green chili". Is that taboo here? Does anyone have a good recipe for it? So far as I can tell it has a shitload of jalepenos in it but I'll be damned what else.

Aniki
Mar 21, 2001

Wouldn't fit...

Nostrum posted:

So I recently spent several weeks in New Mexico and was smitten by "green chili". Is that taboo here? Does anyone have a good recipe for it? So far as I can tell it has a shitload of jalepenos in it but I'll be damned what else.

Hatch Chiles are big in New Mexico.

barbudo
Nov 8, 2010
WHO VOLUNTARILY GOES DAYS WITHOUT A SHOWER FOR NO REASON? DIS GUY

PLEASE SHOWER YOU GROSS FUCK


If you have archives the last chili thread had some good ones. Let me know if you don't and I'll dig them up for you.

FishBulb
Mar 29, 2003

Marge, I'd like to be alone with the sandwich for a moment.

Are you going to eat it?

...yes...


Nostrum posted:

So I recently spent several weeks in New Mexico and was smitten by "green chili". Is that taboo here? Does anyone have a good recipe for it? So far as I can tell it has a shitload of jalepenos in it but I'll be damned what else.

Theres almost nothing in it but chilis generally if you are talking about the green chile topping they put on EVERYTHING here. Its not jalapenos though, its local chilis (hatch or some other varieties). If you're talking about the stew they make its pretty easy too, usually just slow cooked pork/beef in the aforementioned chile sauce.

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

I haven't tried a lot of green chili, but I've made this one a few times and it owned.

http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blog...reen-chili.html

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

you wanna join my
primitive noise band?


signalnoise posted:

Thanks for this, btw what is your favorite temperature for a chili? I like about like 55

After a bit of googling and a while of avoiding the thread because I thought I had posted something completely incoherent, ya 55C. I've since done the same chili with everything except the beer in the SVS, then picked out the meat, added the beer to the sauce, and simmered to taste. The texture is so much better for cubed beef, but I will still always add a ground pork for some different textures goin on.

Xen Tricks
Nov 4, 2010


I've got a question, would it be alright to leave something like Iron Leg's recipe cooking overnight at low in a slow cooker/crock pot? I know longer is better with stews and the like, but is 8+ hours ok, or would the meat break down too much?

Also, replacing the whole tomatoes with pureed/tomato paste would work just as well, right?

Real Name Grover
Feb 13, 2002

Like corn on the cob

Fan of Britches

I made Iron Leg's last Sunday; it was consumed on Monday for the bowl games.

It was a hit, but I did enjoy it even more after it had been in the slow cooker on warm for about seven hours on Monday. A little thicker, richer. You'd probably be OK.

Granted, my lower digestive tract paid for it dearly for about 12 hours afterward

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


SYFY HYPHY posted:

After a bit of googling and a while of avoiding the thread because I thought I had posted something completely incoherent, ya 55C. I've since done the same chili with everything except the beer in the SVS, then picked out the meat, added the beer to the sauce, and simmered to taste. The texture is so much better for cubed beef, but I will still always add a ground pork for some different textures goin on.

Chili deconstructed

For real though I have been thinking of cooking my chili ingredients separately for a long time, the goal being a chili that's combined at the end and has different flavors throughout. Make the meat taste like meat and the sauce taste like chiles, and you could have roasted red pepper chunks in there with the meat or something like that.

No beans though

barbudo
Nov 8, 2010
WHO VOLUNTARILY GOES DAYS WITHOUT A SHOWER FOR NO REASON? DIS GUY

PLEASE SHOWER YOU GROSS FUCK


The issue with that, in my opinion, is that the "sauce" derives liquid both from peppers, any other sauces or vegetables you might add, as well as juices from the meat. But it sounds interested.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


barbudo posted:

The issue with that, in my opinion, is that the "sauce" derives liquid both from peppers, any other sauces or vegetables you might add, as well as juices from the meat. But it sounds interested.

So are you saying you just want meat and sauce? Cause now I'm just thinking about making chili sauce and putting it on various meats. If I put it in a tortilla it would be like having an enchilada any time I want

barbudo
Nov 8, 2010
WHO VOLUNTARILY GOES DAYS WITHOUT A SHOWER FOR NO REASON? DIS GUY

PLEASE SHOWER YOU GROSS FUCK


I add onion, garlic, bell pepper, and tomato. I should have mentioned that. Still , I think the meat confers an essential liquid. Let me know how your idea goes, though, because that sounds awesome and I've been wrong before.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

you wanna join my
primitive noise band?


barbudo posted:

The issue with that, in my opinion, is that the "sauce" derives liquid both from peppers, any other sauces or vegetables you might add, as well as juices from the meat. But it sounds interested.

Easy peasy just empty the meat juice from the sv bag into the sauce and make sure you get the delicious fond mallards from when you sear the meat. Or get some bones and simmer them in the sauce.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


SYFY HYPHY posted:

Easy peasy just empty the meat juice from the sv bag into the sauce and make sure you get the delicious fond mallards from when you sear the meat. Or get some bones and simmer them in the sauce.

Post/av combo makes me wanna put that sauce on a burger. drat

Pleads
Jun 9, 2005

pew pew pew


Does pork tenderloin fall into the realm of acceptable to cube for chili? I've had one in my freezer for a while that does not look like it will be used otherwise, so I figured I would throw it into the big pot of chili I am making this week.

But it seems like an odd meat after the usual talk of ground beef and stewing cubes and whatnot. Pork shoulder I guess is at least from the same animal.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


Pleads posted:

Does pork tenderloin fall into the realm of acceptable to cube for chili? I've had one in my freezer for a while that does not look like it will be used otherwise, so I figured I would throw it into the big pot of chili I am making this week.

But it seems like an odd meat after the usual talk of ground beef and stewing cubes and whatnot. Pork shoulder I guess is at least from the same animal.

IT'S MEAT, AIN'T IT

AriTheDog
Jul 29, 2003
Famously tasty.

Pleads posted:

Does pork tenderloin fall into the realm of acceptable to cube for chili? I've had one in my freezer for a while that does not look like it will be used otherwise, so I figured I would throw it into the big pot of chili I am making this week.

But it seems like an odd meat after the usual talk of ground beef and stewing cubes and whatnot. Pork shoulder I guess is at least from the same animal.

I'm no chili expert, but I would probably add it at the very end when your chili is more complete and just cook it until it's done. I've never tried cooking pork tenderloin until it falls apart, but I'm guessing it would just get tough because it's very lean.

Mr. Wiggles
Dec 1, 2003

I would never shop at Costco. The paper towels won't fit into my sports car!

signalnoise posted:

IT'S MEAT, AIN'T IT

I make chili using only guanciale.

And beans.

YEAH DOG
Sep 24, 2009

you wanna join my
primitive noise band?


HEATHEN

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

I'm skeptical of lean meats in chili. Earlier someone recommended round and I fear it would just dry up and become tough unless you add it near the end and that seems to defeat the purpose. Likewise, turkey gets a bad texture if you stew it for too long.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


wormil posted:

I'm skeptical of lean meats in chili. Earlier someone recommended round and I fear it would just dry up and become tough unless you add it near the end and that seems to defeat the purpose. Likewise, turkey gets a bad texture if you stew it for too long.

You also don't want a huge oil slick on top of your chili, which is what happens if you use a big loving slab of chuck.

Pookah
Aug 21, 2008

Caw





Am I the only one who adds a little bit of (good) smoked paprika? I'm talking like a 1/2 teaspoon to an 8 serving pot; I find it adds a very nice background smokey flavour.

Also worcestershire sauce, because that works with everything meaty.

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

wormil posted:

I'm skeptical of lean meats in chili. Earlier someone recommended round and I fear it would just dry up and become tough unless you add it near the end and that seems to defeat the purpose. Likewise, turkey gets a bad texture if you stew it for too long.

It works great, I made steak chili last Sunday with sirloin. I used this as the basis of the recipe but modified things here and there

http://www.theyummylife.com/blog/20...rty+Steak+Chili

barbudo
Nov 8, 2010
WHO VOLUNTARILY GOES DAYS WITHOUT A SHOWER FOR NO REASON? DIS GUY

PLEASE SHOWER YOU GROSS FUCK


Yes and yes.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

signalnoise posted:

You also don't want a huge oil slick on top of your chili, which is what happens if you use a big loving slab of chuck.

You realize that the "stew meat" you recommended earlier will contain a large amount of chuck off-cuts. I've made chili from chuck dozens of times and never had an "oil slick" so you're doing something very wrong.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


wormil posted:

You realize that the "stew meat" you recommended earlier will contain a large amount of chuck off-cuts. I've made chili from chuck dozens of times and never had an "oil slick" so you're doing something very wrong.

Have you ever made it with a big untrimmed slab of chuck? Chuck just comes with a lot of fat if you buy a big piece of it, or if you get it ground. If you trim the fat away you might as well call it fairly lean. This is also the case if you brown it enough that the fat renders away during browning before you put it in the stew pot. I don't see a meaningful difference in fat content between cubing an already lean piece of beef and cutting away the fat from a piece of beef that isn't so marbled you can't trim the fat away, when you're stewing it for 8 hours. No amount of not being lean is going to save your meat from that. It's going to fall apart. If you are cooking your chili for a short enough amount of time that the leanness of your meat really matters, I question your technique.


I'll see about trying your advice out though. Next time I make chili I'll be sure to thread my beef with lardons to prevent it from getting an unwanted texture. I'm sure it'll make a real difference in the texture of the final product.

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mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004





Pookah posted:

Am I the only one who adds a little bit of (good) smoked paprika? I'm talking like a 1/2 teaspoon to an 8 serving pot; I find it adds a very nice background smokey flavour.

Also worcestershire sauce, because that works with everything meaty.

just smoke/grill your meat, like any good chili maker should be doing, friend.

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