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redmercer
Sep 15, 2011

by Fistgrrl


Bob Morales posted:

What can you do to make it come out less tomatoey? Other than hurt use less tomato.

You don't have to use any tomatoes at all to make chili, really.

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fishing with the fam
Feb 29, 2008

Durr


Super Bowl chili time! This is only my second time attempting a Texas style chili, and my first time using homemade chili powder. I usually make a midwest style chili with ground beef, tomatoes, and beans. I hope it comes out okay.



Two hours later it is all in the pot. (Holy crap am I slow)



Should be ready around kickoff.

Silly Burrito
Nov 26, 2007

HE'S OVER FIVE THOUSAAAAAAND!!!!!


Lipstick Apathy

Has anyone had the Texas chili from Jason's Deli? I'd love to find a recipe that clones it or comes close, but I can't find anything but their chicken chili recipe. I'm guessing it's just ground beef, but it's pretty tasty.

The Lord Bude
May 23, 2007

I'M DISAPPOINTED THAT CORTANA WILL BE A CIRCLE AND NOT THE ACTUAL SEXY WOMAN FROM THE GAME.


I like to use freshly brewed plunger coffee in my chilli, instead of beer.

I have always used beef for chilli but after reading this thread I am interested in Pork... Is Pork shoulder the preferred cut?

Also, I read that some people add Chorizo... what proportion pork to Chorizo would you reccomend?

Cavatica
Nov 2, 2010



Chiming in to say that this thread (or rather the previous chili thread) inspired me to ditch the ground grey meat and store-bought chili powder. I'm making a batch that literally woke me up this morning because it smelled so good.

barbudo
Nov 8, 2010
WHO VOLUNTARILY GOES DAYS WITHOUT A SHOWER FOR NO REASON? DIS GUY

PLEASE SHOWER YOU GROSS FUCK


The Lord Bude posted:

I like to use freshly brewed plunger coffee in my chilli, instead of beer.

I have always used beef for chilli but after reading this thread I am interested in Pork... Is Pork shoulder the preferred cut?

Also, I read that some people add Chorizo... what proportion pork to Chorizo would you reccomend?

Chorizo is great and will go well with anything. If I'm using steak (I have never done pork+chorizo) I will use a 1.5/1 proportion of chorizo to steak. But be warned, if it's fresh (don't bother with it if it's dried or pre-cooked) it's going to give you a lot of liquid. There may not be anything to deglaze using beer/coffee, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. You can and should still add another liquid.

buck i
Oct 31, 2010


I decided to break in my dutch oven with Iron Leg's recipe. I used a cubed chuck roast, Italian sausage because I thought I had some chorizo but apparently I had used it already, a couple cayennes that I dried a couple months ago, and Yeungling because I love my cheap nectar of the gods.

My house already smells amazing.

Pre-Cambrian Syndrome
Jan 6, 2006



I did some baby chili. You should too, unless you're a horrible negligent monster.


Make some unsalted beef stock before you begin. This takes a while so you might want to do it a day prior to the actual cooking. Brown bones lightly in oven, boil in water for several hours.


The stuff:

Chuck roast
Pork ribs

Bell peppers
Garlic
Onions
Carrots
Beef stock

Tomato paste
Beer (non-alcoholic)
Ground cumin
Paprika powder
Oregano


We wont be browning any meat, but we can develop a little bit of flavor by heating cumin and paprika in oil.


Sweat (whitout browning) the carrots, onions and garlic.


Charr, peel and chop peppers


Add stock, beer, tomato paste, oregano, peppers and cubed meat. Stir to combine.


Simmer for several hours, until everything falls apart by the touch of a spoon. Chill rapidly on wintery balcony or in ice water bath. Skim some of the dangerous animal fat that coagulates on top. Add healthy fat to compensate.


Purée, add rice and corn, purée some more. Freeze portion sized blobs for later use.


Plate.


Acquire a small baby (approx. 15lb / 7kg). Depending on your method this can be the most interesting part of the whole endeavor. There are some great tutorials online if you wish to learn more.


Serve via small spoon. Repeat until chili is everywhere. Then serve dessert. When dessert is everywhere, the baby is no longer hungry.

feelz good man
Jan 21, 2007

deal with it


saigon_15 posted:

I did some baby chili. You should too, unless you're a horrible negligent monster.

[...]

We wont be browning any meat [...]

Skim some of the dangerous animal fat that coagulates on top. Add healthy fat to compensate.
Why aren't you browning the beef after spending so much time browning the bones to make a nice stock? It seems like a huge waste.

Also, if animal fat is dangerous, why are you feeding chili to a small child?

Elizabethan Error
May 18, 2006



saigon_15 posted:

there's a jar of salsa in the bg yet no mention of it in the recipe. how is this chili if there're no peppers in there?

e: this is really something you should be posting in the Cooking Children thread

Elizabethan Error fucked around with this message at Feb 13, 2012 around 20:16

Pookah
Aug 21, 2008

Caw





Well I think it's a great addition to the thread

It is, after all, a thread about cooking chili, and that is a special chili recipe for a very specific audience.

Kudos for introducing your babby to interesting food at a young age.

Elizabethan Error
May 18, 2006



Pookah posted:

It is, after all, a thread about cooking chili, and that is a special chili recipe for a very specific audience.
chili without hot peppers isn't chili

E: VV I did notice the pictures, I'm not saying he should be feeding his kid peppers(yet), but sticking bell peppers in meat stew doesn't make it chili

Elizabethan Error fucked around with this message at Feb 13, 2012 around 22:08

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Edit: ^^^^ it's for a babby, dude.

saigon_15 posted:

I did some baby chili. You should too, unless you're a horrible negligent monster.

Echoing the "you should have browned the meat" and the "don't use jar salsa" comments.

If you want a better way to take the animal fat out: chill the chili. It will all solidify on the surface. If you're going through the trouble of removing it, I don't know why you would add some back. The only reason you would want fat in there is for mouthfeel and richness, but this is babby food and you're pureeing it anyway. Just remove the fat, there will be plenty residual for health purposes.

Pre-Cambrian Syndrome
Jan 6, 2006



feelz good man posted:

Why aren't you browning the beef after spending so much time browning the bones to make a nice stock? It seems like a huge waste.

Also, if animal fat is dangerous, why are you feeding chili to a small child?

Moderation, my friend. I can't feed the kid a pot full of seared meat, but I compensate and get him used to the flavour by having some browned bones in the stock.

Also, hyperbole. It's not 'dangerous', but if the ratio of unsaturated fat is a little higher then all the better.

MasterFugu posted:

there's a jar of salsa in the bg yet no mention of it in the recipe. how is this chili if there're no peppers in there?


That's tomato paste. And those are peppers. Sweet, mild, bell peppers.

I'll post my grown up chili (made parallel) if I find the time.

Pookah posted:

Well I think it's a great addition to the thread

It is, after all, a thread about cooking chili, and that is a special chili recipe for a very specific audience.

Kudos for introducing your babby to interesting food at a young age.

Thank you!

Pre-Cambrian Syndrome
Jan 6, 2006



GrAviTy84 posted:

If you want a better way to take the animal fat out: chill the chili. It will all solidify on the surface. If you're going through the trouble of removing it, I don't know why you would add some back. The only reason you would want fat in there is for mouthfeel and richness, but this is babby food and you're pureeing it anyway. Just remove the fat, there will be plenty residual for health purposes.

That's actually what I did. Maybe it's not called skimming, but I scraped some off the top after cooling it for a few hours on the balcony.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



saigon_15 posted:

I can't feed the kid a pot full of seared meat

What? Why?

Pre-Cambrian Syndrome
Jan 6, 2006



Because then I'd have to listen to him whimper like a sick dog while all of his 12 inches of intestines tried to process charcoal.



Edit: This joke was apparently hard to comprehend. I'm very sorry about that. What I meant to say was: small children has a hard time digesting the crust of fried food. When your kid has a hard time digesting something, your life will by proxy be quite miserable too. Therefor I introduce this element very slowly into his diet.

Pre-Cambrian Syndrome fucked around with this message at Feb 13, 2012 around 22:49

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



saigon_15 posted:

Because then I'd have to listen to him whimper like a sick dog while all of his 12 inches of intestines tried to process charcoal.

You're browning things wrong.

EAT THE EGGS RICOLA
May 29, 2008



saigon_15 posted:

Because then I'd have to listen to him whimper like a sick dog while all of his 12 inches of intestines tried to process charcoal.
That's not what browning means. If your food is black you're doing it very wrong.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


I'd hate to see what you think blackened means

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004





saigon_15 posted:


Edit: This joke was apparently hard to comprehend. I'm very sorry about that. What I meant to say was: small children has a hard time digesting the crust of fried food. When your kid has a hard time digesting something, your life will by proxy be quite miserable too. Therefor I introduce this element very slowly into his diet.


I think they were saying you should brown your chili meat, not fry it?

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

The previous chili thread recommended adding flour after browning the meat to absorb the fat and thicken the stew. Maybe not something you want to do in baby food though. I made bean soup for my daughter when she was about 18 months and she ate it like candy. Looked like she had swam in it by the time she was done.

Pre-Cambrian Syndrome
Jan 6, 2006



mindphlux posted:

I think they were saying you should brown your chili meat, not fry it?

Ok then.

Point is, when you heat the surface of meat (or other ingredients) to the point where brown color develops, it becomes hard to digest. You might not think of it, what with your full grown digestive tract and whatnot, but to a baby browned meat in quantity would feel like digesting charcoal.

You should under no circumstances put actual charcoal in your chili.

Pre-Cambrian Syndrome
Jan 6, 2006



Now that the kids are fed I thought I'd cook something up for the grown-ups table. This one has a bit of a sting, and takes somewhere around 8-10 hours to reach the desired flavour and consistency. I started too late in the afternoon and had to let it rest for a few hours while I slept, and finished it with an extra couple of hours of simmering in the morning.


Ingredients:

Chuck roast
Ribs
(Spanish) Chorizo,
Peppers
Garlic
Tomato paste
Stock
Porter beer
Ground cumin (not pictured)
white wine (not pictured)
Dark chocolate (not pictured)


Cube, season and brown meat in batches. Start with the chorizo, to render some delicious fat for the other meat to absorb.

Meanwhile, soak the dried peppers in wine.

After the last batch, lower the heat (or take it off the burner if you're using cast iron) and add ground cumin to the pan. Stir to prevent burning. When it smells amazing, add some water to the pan and whisk around a bit. Add the liquid to a large pot.

Chop peppers and garlic, and add to the pot together with the browned meat and a blob of tomato paste. Add the wine while you're at it.


Simmer on low heat with a lid on, or partially on. Somewhere around the 6 hour, add chocolate to taste. Keep simmering. At the last of the above pictures there's still some 3 hours of simmering ahead.


Plate with beans(they're controversial!), some red onion and some green stuff. Eat with rice, bread or whatever floats your boat. Also, keep a drink on hand.

Inverse Icarus
Dec 4, 2003

I run SyncRPG, and produce original, digital content for the Pathfinder RPG, designed from the ground up to be played online.


I'm on a diet and one of my staples is chili. It's a low carb meal that you make a giant pot of, and then you have it all week to just microwave on command.

Reading this thread this far into my diet has made me sad, I've been eating a pretty pathetic excuse for chili for the past four months, it seems.

I'm one of those people who just uses ground beef and beans at the core. All of these steak chunks and three meat concoctions look delicious.



Going to have to try to upgrade this poo poo next time I make a batch.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

Just finished watching the Ultimate Chili Cook Off and frankly their chili looked disgusting. They all use similar recipes that include tri-tip, tomato paste and a blend of store bought dried spices. I didn't see one person use real garlic, tomato or chilies.

Here are their 'winning' recipes:
http://www.chilicookoff.com/Recipe/...cipes.asp?Cat=1

One thing I found interesting and I'm wondering if there is a legitimate reason for it... they were all careful to not brown their meat but all that grey meat looked gross.
.

czechshaun
Dec 13, 2004
en trance


Thanks to this thread I went out and made my own chili powder. The smell from the cumin when making it is absolutely delish! I could also instantly tell a difference from the store bought stuff I have used every other time.

Luckily I live in central texas so chilis of all variety are plentiful.



Thanks a ton for the help Kenning.

czechshaun fucked around with this message at Feb 17, 2012 around 03:20

Kenning
Jan 10, 2009

I really want to post goatse. I wish I had 10bux


Just use [img][/img] tags and this link: http://i.imgur.com/Hd92El.jpg

Kenning fucked around with this message at Feb 17, 2012 around 02:22

Pre-Cambrian Syndrome
Jan 6, 2006



wormil posted:

One thing I found interesting and I'm wondering if there is a legitimate reason for it... they were all careful to not brown their meat but all that grey meat looked gross.
.

Maybe they where cooking for very small children.

Personally I've found that fresh tomatos aren't worth it. At least not this far north in the middle of the winter. Some nice tomato paste is perfectly sufficient if you don't want much tomato flavour. I mainly add it for color.

But there's no excuse not to use fresh peppers if they're available.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

They were competing for $25,000, you'd think they would use some real ingredients. Then again, none of the people they focused on even placed but judging by their winning recipes, most of the contestants are doing the same thing.

Dead Of Winter
Dec 17, 2003

It's morning again in America.

wormil posted:

They were competing for $25,000, you'd think they would use some real ingredients. Then again, none of the people they focused on even placed but judging by their winning recipes, most of the contestants are doing the same thing.

The reasons a lot of chili-cookoff people don't use real ingredients is, I'm told, a matter of consistency. If you just use powdered/dried ingredients processed under very controlled conditions, that gives you a better idea of what your end product will look like. And these people want to know EXACTLY what their chili will taste like before they even start cooking.

I don't know how true or false that is; it's plausible enough.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

A little off-topic but I made chili-rice tonight. Started by sauteing about 1/4 onion in lard, added about 1/3 cup leftover cooked hamburger (that had jalapeno, garlic and onion mixed in), one cascabel and three arbol ground chilies, a sprinkle of turmeric, one cup rice and two cups beef stock. Outstanding.

signalnoise
Mar 7, 2008


wormil posted:

A little off-topic but I made chili-rice tonight. Started by sauteing about 1/4 onion in lard, added about 1/3 cup leftover cooked hamburger (that had jalapeno, garlic and onion mixed in), one cascabel and three arbol ground chilies, a sprinkle of turmeric, one cup rice and two cups beef stock. Outstanding.

I will do this

Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

Resurrecting this from my NICSA entry.

Chipotle and Chocolate Chili

Ingredients:

5 lbs trimmed and cubed Chuck
1 lb Spicy Breakfast Sausage (Owens is the best. Jimmy Dean sucks)
2 Medium Onions, minced
5 Cloves of Garlic, minced
1 bottle Double Chocolate Stout
3 oz Bourbon
32 oz Beef Broth
3.5 oz Chipotle In Adobo
9 Tbsp Chili Powder (Details below)
1 Tbsp Black Pepper
Salt to Taste



First off, you are going to want to brown your meat a little bit. I do this in two pans simultaneously, because otherwise it would take forever. IMPORTANT: You do not want to actually cook the meat through here at all. If you cook the meat to done now, it will be dry and tough in the final product. I find that thoroughly browning one side is the best that I can do without cooking the meat beyond medium rarish. Rocket hot pan with a little bit beef fat rendered out from the Chuck trimmings.

This is what you should be aiming for.



Once you reach this, put this batch of beef into a holding bowl, and start the next batch. Once all of the beef is done, brown the sausage. Really BROWN it. Don't just cook it through. You want some nice roasty brown color on there. Like this:



Put the sausage into the holding bowl with the beef. Drain about half of the fat off first.

After all this is done, deglaze the skillet with the bourbon!



In the pot, the moisture from the onions(which you should add now) will be more than enough to get all the fond off of the bottom. If you are using one pan, go ahead and deglaze that pan with the bourbon, then add the onion to it.

Sweat the onions on medium heat until they are completely translucent, then add the garlic and cook for another 2-3 minutes. You don't want to caramelize the onions, just cook them through(the color you see in the picture is from the beef bits left in the pan, not from caramelized onion).



While your onions are sweating, you want to toast your chili powder. Chili powder is incredibly important (you would think that this would be obvious). My particular blend this go 'round is equal parts Durango, Ancho, San Antonio Red, and Dried Chipotle. If you happen to have a great place that has a great variety of dried chilies, then awesome, grinding your own is really good, and dirt cheap. If you do not, or you are lazy, there really is no shame in buying chili powder mixes from elsewhere, just buy small quantities that you know that you will go through quickly, so it will be reasonably fresh.

Even if your chilies have been toasted prior to blending, you are going to want to take your finished powder and toss it into a small pan over medium heat. You want to stir this regularly until the smell of chili punches you in the face, but before the burning smell. Friends always ask me how they will know that they have reached this point, and I always just respond with "trust me, you will know". Your kitchen will go from "Hmmm, I think that I can smell chili powder" to "Holy poo poo that smells amazing" within a few seconds.



After you are done toasting it, set it aside until your onions and garlic are done are done. Once they are, add all of your chili powder and stir it into a paste, then add all of your meat and the juice in the bowl back to the pot and stir it all up. It is likely that enough liquid came out of the beef while it was holding that a decent sauce has been created in the pot.

Because I didn't remember to put them into the main ingredients picture, here are the chipotles that I use, and how finely minced you want them.



You want to turn these bad boys into a paste.



Add all of these to the pot as well, including the excess adobo from the can. You can leave the adobo out to cut down a little on the spice. If you want to cut down on the spice further still, leave out half of the Chiptole. If you really want to cut down on the spice, don't eat chili, or grow pair of testicles and eat it anyway.

It should now look like this!



Then go ahead and stir in your stout!



At this point, you will want to stir in your broth. Now comes the slightly tricky part. You want the heat to be at just the right spot. You are looking for a very, very bare simmer. If you can get it, you want one, tiny line of bubbles breaking the surface of your chili. Be very careful on this, as if you ever get the mix to a full boil, or close to it, your meat is going to get stringy and tough.

Seriously, start your stove on the lowest setting, and come back in 30 minutes. If no bubbles at all are breaking the surface, turn it up a tiny bit and come back in 10 minutes. Repeat this until you get the right temperature.

You want to cook the chili uncovered, so that moisture evaporates, and your chili thickens/intensifies in flavor. You should stir this once every 30 minutes or so once you have found the perfect stove setting. Continue this until it is done, which is when it is very thick, and the meat is tender and falling apart when lightly pressured.

1 hour in.



4 hours in.


6 hours in.


6 1/2 hours in, and ready to eat.


Put that in your mouth.


The spice of this blend, and the additional chipotle is a very soft heat, that takes a while to build up. It is a very pleasant warming sensation that starts creeping from the tip of your tongue all the way to the back of your throat over the duration of the bowl. I think that the flavor of the chili is spot on at this point, so I wouldn't really add anything else, however if you want more heat, do what I do. Add this stuff: http://www.amazon.com/Pure-Cap-2-oz/dp/B0007MXR92



It is flavorless, but 500,000 scoville units. I loving love this stuff for any application where I want more heat without affecting the overall flavor profile of the dish.

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004





Doom Rooster posted:

Resurrecting this from my NICSA entry.

Chipotle and Chocolate Chili

Ingredients:

5 lbs trimmed and cubed Chuck
1 lb Spicy Breakfast Sausage (Owens is the best. Jimmy Dean sucks)
2 Medium Onions, minced
5 Cloves of Garlic, minced
1 bottle Double Chocolate Stout
3 oz Bourbon
32 oz Beef Broth
3.5 oz Chipotle In Adobo
9 Tbsp Chili Powder (Details below)
1 Tbsp Black Pepper
Salt to Taste



First off, you are going to want to brown your meat a little bit. I do this in two pans simultaneously, because otherwise it would take forever. IMPORTANT: You do not want to actually cook the meat through here at all. If you cook the meat to done now, it will be dry and tough in the final product. I find that thoroughly browning one side is the best that I can do without cooking the meat beyond medium rarish. Rocket hot pan with a little bit beef fat rendered out from the Chuck trimmings.

This is what you should be aiming for.



Once you reach this, put this batch of beef into a holding bowl, and start the next batch. Once all of the beef is done, brown the sausage. Really BROWN it. Don't just cook it through. You want some nice roasty brown color on there. Like this:



Put the sausage into the holding bowl with the beef. Drain about half of the fat off first.

After all this is done, deglaze the skillet with the bourbon!



In the pot, the moisture from the onions(which you should add now) will be more than enough to get all the fond off of the bottom. If you are using one pan, go ahead and deglaze that pan with the bourbon, then add the onion to it.

Sweat the onions on medium heat until they are completely translucent, then add the garlic and cook for another 2-3 minutes. You don't want to caramelize the onions, just cook them through(the color you see in the picture is from the beef bits left in the pan, not from caramelized onion).



While your onions are sweating, you want to toast your chili powder. Chili powder is incredibly important (you would think that this would be obvious). My particular blend this go 'round is equal parts Durango, Ancho, San Antonio Red, and Dried Chipotle. If you happen to have a great place that has a great variety of dried chilies, then awesome, grinding your own is really good, and dirt cheap. If you do not, or you are lazy, there really is no shame in buying chili powder mixes from elsewhere, just buy small quantities that you know that you will go through quickly, so it will be reasonably fresh.

Even if your chilies have been toasted prior to blending, you are going to want to take your finished powder and toss it into a small pan over medium heat. You want to stir this regularly until the smell of chili punches you in the face, but before the burning smell. Friends always ask me how they will know that they have reached this point, and I always just respond with "trust me, you will know". Your kitchen will go from "Hmmm, I think that I can smell chili powder" to "Holy poo poo that smells amazing" within a few seconds.



After you are done toasting it, set it aside until your onions and garlic are done are done. Once they are, add all of your chili powder and stir it into a paste, then add all of your meat and the juice in the bowl back to the pot and stir it all up. It is likely that enough liquid came out of the beef while it was holding that a decent sauce has been created in the pot.

Because I didn't remember to put them into the main ingredients picture, here are the chipotles that I use, and how finely minced you want them.



You want to turn these bad boys into a paste.



Add all of these to the pot as well, including the excess adobo from the can. You can leave the adobo out to cut down a little on the spice. If you want to cut down on the spice further still, leave out half of the Chiptole. If you really want to cut down on the spice, don't eat chili, or grow pair of testicles and eat it anyway.

It should now look like this!



Then go ahead and stir in your stout!



At this point, you will want to stir in your broth. Now comes the slightly tricky part. You want the heat to be at just the right spot. You are looking for a very, very bare simmer. If you can get it, you want one, tiny line of bubbles breaking the surface of your chili. Be very careful on this, as if you ever get the mix to a full boil, or close to it, your meat is going to get stringy and tough.

Seriously, start your stove on the lowest setting, and come back in 30 minutes. If no bubbles at all are breaking the surface, turn it up a tiny bit and come back in 10 minutes. Repeat this until you get the right temperature.

You want to cook the chili uncovered, so that moisture evaporates, and your chili thickens/intensifies in flavor. You should stir this once every 30 minutes or so once you have found the perfect stove setting. Continue this until it is done, which is when it is very thick, and the meat is tender and falling apart when lightly pressured.

1 hour in.



4 hours in.


6 hours in.


6 1/2 hours in, and ready to eat.


Put that in your mouth.


The spice of this blend, and the additional chipotle is a very soft heat, that takes a while to build up. It is a very pleasant warming sensation that starts creeping from the tip of your tongue all the way to the back of your throat over the duration of the bowl. I think that the flavor of the chili is spot on at this point, so I wouldn't really add anything else, however if you want more heat, do what I do. Add this stuff: http://www.amazon.com/Pure-Cap-2-oz/dp/B0007MXR92



It is flavorless, but 500,000 scoville units. I loving love this stuff for any application where I want more heat without affecting the overall flavor profile of the dish.

thread needs more actual chili recipes. goodjob

this is basically how I make mine, but I grill the meat to brown it, and homemade stock for the win. looks tasty.


also, so noone feels tempted to use an entire can of that chipolte in adobo sauce thing - it freezes really well. I have a ziplock in my freezer of the stuff, and I've actually been thin slicing off little shavings to throw in other dishes that I normally wouldn't want a lot of chipolte flavor in. it's been great, and really convenient - so glad I decided to freeze my leftovers after my last chili making journey.

mindphlux fucked around with this message at Feb 22, 2012 around 02:59

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

I would like to see more chili powder recipes. The only one I've made at home was the AB combination with 3 each ancho, cascabel, & arbol base. I can always make it spicier but I'm interested in good flavor combinations.

Valdara
May 12, 2003

burn, pillage, ORGANIZE!

I just made "chili" in all the ways you aren't supposed to. I sauteed up some garlic/onion/carrots, then stirred in some dried beans that I didn't bother to soak, threw in a few cans of tomato sauce, some tomatoes, some pepper and cumin, let simmer for about three hours. The beans are just about perfect, firm and tasty, not mushy at all. I added more tomatoes, salt, and some other stuff near the end. Then, at the very end, I stirred in fresh ground chipotle powder and the pulled pork I made over the weekend that wasn't getting eaten fast enough.

This was basically "holy gently caress I have a lot of beans, and even the quick soak will put my chili too far behind where I want it, so screw it". It's more of a chili-like substance than eight hours of slow cooked goodness, but I'm eating a bowl right now and enjoying the hell out of it.

mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004





wormil posted:

I would like to see more chili powder recipes. The only one I've made at home was the AB combination with 3 each ancho, cascabel, & arbol base. I can always make it spicier but I'm interested in good flavor combinations.

spicy is not the point of chili powder as far as I'm concerned.

just go to whatever market sells chilies in your area, and buy handfuls of every type. go home and just eat them. like, cut a strip and just gnaw on it for a while - it should give you a good idea of the flavor. find whatever you like, and use it.

the chili powder I made a couple weeks ago had guajillo, mulato, pasilla, ancho, and a little cumin and salt. no rhyme or reason, just grabbed some chilies and went with it. seeded them, toasted in a oven for about 30 mins at 300 deg tossing frequently until they dried out a little (some were quite pliable/moise to begin with) and then threw in a food processor, then a coffee grinder to get really powdery stuff.

it smells divine.

wormil
Sep 12, 2002

Hulk will smoke you!

mindphlux posted:

spicy is not the point of chili powder as far as I'm concerned.

just go to whatever market sells chilies in your area, and buy handfuls of every type. go home and just eat them. like, cut a strip and just gnaw on it for a while - it should give you a good idea of the flavor. find whatever you like, and use it.

This is a good idea. I've only found them by the bag but I guess it won't hurt to experiment. I just wanted to avoid accidentally buying a bunch of similar, very spicy, chilies. I already have a big bag of arbols.

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mindphlux
Jan 8, 2004





wormil posted:

This is a good idea. I've only found them by the bag but I guess it won't hurt to experiment. I just wanted to avoid accidentally buying a bunch of similar, very spicy, chilies. I already have a big bag of arbols.

most of the large ones sold in bags by hispanic sounding brands are surprisingly not spicy - just go for the larger ones and you'll be fine. arbols are actually some of the spiciest dried chilies you'll see in that section of the supermarket.

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