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Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Tell me more about the tomatillos. How to pick good ones, how to prepare for use etc. They're easy to get here. Is canned an option?

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fermun
Nov 4, 2009

The X-Files will return in a moment.



Ranter posted:

Tell me more about the tomatillos. How to pick good ones, how to prepare for use etc. They're easy to get here. Is canned an option?

I always use fresh because I live in the same neighborhood you do and they're so easy to get here. The husk shouldn't be totally wilted, it should still be green and somewhat tight. If the husk is loose but still green or just has a little bit of yellow or brown, it's fine. I just peel the husk back, cut out any blemishes, rinse in cold water, halve, and broil skin up until it blackens a bit.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004





















































iospace
Apr 20, 2020




Grimey Drawer

That does not look good at all and should handed to me for safe disposal.

hellfaucet
Apr 7, 2009




gently caress. Hook up the proportions on this bad boy if you're willing.

hellfaucet fucked around with this message at Nov 15, 2017 around 10:55

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



I won our work chili cook off again, 2 years in a row now.

Sorry but I really can't be bothered providing measurements, just wing it that's what I do.

hellfaucet
Apr 7, 2009



Ranter posted:

I won our work chili cook off again, 2 years in a row now.

Sorry but I really can't be bothered providing measurements, just wing it that's what I do.

No worries, congrats!

BraveUlysses
Aug 7, 2002



Grimey Drawer

Hell yeah that's some chili

What did you use to make the stock? Bones and shanks?

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



BraveUlysses posted:

Hell yeah that's some chili

What did you use to make the stock? Bones and shanks?

Beef neck bone and a shin. From an asian market.

THE MACHO MAN
Nov 15, 2007

...Carey...

draw me like one of your French Canadian girls



gently caress yeah.

I do mine pretty similar, but usually pull it off once the meat starts falling apart. And I like having hunks of chorizo and longaniza in mine:





bewbies
Sep 23, 2003

Bo?


Fun Shoe

resurrect the chili thread!

want to win office chili competition. Judges are random people from the office.

My current best recipes are 1) basically ripped off from the 2016 red chili winner here (add adobos, using arbol, pasilla negra, and new mexico chilis), a similar approach for "mom chili" with beans and ground beef instead of tri tip/chuck, and a very good pork verde.

- which one should I use? I'm leaning towards mom chili with double meat.

- how spicy should I go? I use new mexico hot to variate my spicy level: one tbsp for guest chili, two for me and wife chili, three for me only chili. guests usually say "it is spicy" with the 1tsbp stuff but then they eat all of it. i'm leaning towards a half tbsp.

- if I make the texas stuff, chuck or tri tip? I prefer tri tip as it is less greasy and has better mouthfeel (to me at least), but chuck gets that melt in mouth thing that people really love I and I guess I could spoon off the grease if there is too much.

any other way I can up the flavor for one or two bites? my current chili mix gives a great blend of spicy and fruity, would like to double down on that.

Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

Office chili cookoff advice can vary.

1) What state is this office located in?

2) On a scale of 1-10, how white is the average judge on the panel?


I am obviously biased towards Texas style, and I prefer chuck over tri-tip. If you are in Cali, go with tri-tip though.

As far as 1-2 bite "WOW! Factor", heavier on the chipotle. Big blast of delicious smokiness is impressive, even if a whole bowl would be fatiguing.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



As 2 times reigning champ of my work chili cook off, I attribute the following towards elevating my food above others:

1. Making beef broth from scratch. Store bought is nothing, NOTHING, compared to home simmered beef broth. This adds so much depth of beefy goodness it's really the secret ingredient. 1 week before putting the chili together spend I 1 hour shopping and prepping for the stock, and then keep an eye on it for 8 hours while it simmers. If you have a pressure cooker that cuts down the time significantly but I enjoy spending a lazy day at home, keeping an eye on it whilst I play video games and day drink.

2. Umami. MSG, fish sauce, both, up to you.

3. Making your own chili paste/powder with the whole dried Mexican chilis you see in plastic bags in stores, freshly toasted whole cumin that you pound/grind fresh yourself, chipotles in adobo, etc. Pick 3 or 4 varietals of chili, de-seed, soak, blitz with everything else.

4. Pork.

edit: 5. Let chili sit in fridge after making for 2 days.

And don't forget to take it easy on the salt then just before it's 'done' cooking down to desired consistency taste it and salt it properly. Home cooks don't salt their food properly and wonder why it is blander than restaurants.

Doom Rooster posted:

I am obviously biased towards Texas style, and I prefer chuck over tri-tip. If you are in Cali, go with tri-tip though.

I'm norcal and go with a good quality whole chuck roast that I cube up myself, along with a bit of pork shoulder.

Ranter fucked around with this message at Jan 22, 2018 around 19:23

bewbies
Sep 23, 2003

Bo?


Fun Shoe

Ranter posted:

1. Making beef broth from scratch.

I've tried this a couple of times with mixed results, do you have a good recipe?

Doom Rooster posted:

Office chili cookoff advice can vary.

1) What state is this office located in?

2) On a scale of 1-10, how white is the average judge on the panel?


I am obviously biased towards Texas style, and I prefer chuck over tri-tip. If you are in Cali, go with tri-tip though.

As far as 1-2 bite "WOW! Factor", heavier on the chipotle. Big blast of delicious smokiness is impressive, even if a whole bowl would be fatiguing.


1) kansas

2) i think it is actually pretty diverse to include both an old black lady and a hispanic guy

bewbies fucked around with this message at Jan 22, 2018 around 17:06

Doom Rooster
Sep 3, 2008


Pillbug

Ranter posted:

As 2 times reigning champ of my work chili cook off, I attribute the following towards elevating my food above others:

1. Making beef broth from scratch. Store bought is nothing, NOTHING, compared to home simmered beef broth. This adds so much depth of beefy goodness it's really the secret ingredient. 1 week before putting the chili together spend I 1 hour shopping and prepping for the stock, and then keep an eye on it for 8 hours while it simmers. If you have a pressure cooker that cuts down the time significantly but I enjoy spending a lazy day at home, keeping an eye on it whilst I play video games and day drink.

2. Umami. MSG, fish sauce, both, up to you.

3. Making your own chili paste/powder with the whole dried Mexican chilis you see in plastic bags in stores, freshly toasted whole cumin that you pound/grind fresh yourself, chipotles in adobo, etc. Pick 3 or 4 varietals of chili, de-seed, soak, blitz with everything else.

4. Pork.

And don't forget to take it easy on the salt then just before it's 'done' cooking down to desired consistency taste it and salt it properly. Home cooks don't salt their food properly and wonder why it is blander than restaurants.


I'm norcal and go with a good quality whole chuck roast that I cube up myself, along with a bit of pork shoulder.

All great tips. I incorporate the pork via a roll of hot sausage, rather than pork shoulder. It pretty much disintegrates into a much thicker sauce, and I prefer a single distinguishable meat for the chunks.

As far as chuck vs. tri-tip, I definitely think that chuck is the better option, but I've never met someone from Cali that didn't get at least half-mast from the mere mention of tri-tip, so would be a great way to score some points off the bat for a cookoff in Cali.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



bewbies posted:

I've tried this a couple of times with mixed results, do you have a good recipe?

Just traditional method. I'm not going for consomme so it's a brown cloudy delicious broth.

Onions
Carrots
Celery
Beef bones with some meat on them (last batch was with very meaty beef neck bones from my local asian market and it was fantastic)
Water

Roast the bones hard
Half the onions
Cut the celery and carrots into slightly more manageable lengths
Throw it all in a big arse pot and cover with water and bring to a boil then down to a light simmer. Skim off the crud that forms in the beginning. Simmer for at least 6 but probably 8 hours. My partner is a chef and she says beef should take longer than chicken stock.

Once it's about ready, pick the bones out, strain it (I used my partners chinois, so good for this), then if there's still a lot of broth you can always reduce it by boiling it down.

Ranter fucked around with this message at Jan 22, 2018 around 17:11

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


I made chili this weekend using this recipe: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/...-con-carne.html, omitting the cinnamon, allspice, and fish sauce because I was using nice beef and chilis and didn't feel i needed it. (I didn't bother buying masa but if i had some i would have used it). The chilis I used were pasilla, arbol, and choricero.

Searing the chuck as steaks then cubing post-sear was a revelation. Useful for all sorts of stews.

The chili chunks he called for were too big. It was a little labor intensive but I roughly tore apart the meat chunks post-cook then added them back to the sauce - getting rough tears increased the surface area so it ended up really well.

What surprised me was how much the consistency of the sauce changed after sitting in the refrigerator for 48 hours. The sauce went from thin to extremely thick and the meat became substantially more tender, more than braises normally seem to after sitting. I'm wondering if adding the vinegar post-cook has any tenderizing effect on the meat, but it wasn't much vinegar. Wouldn't change anything, recipe came out perfect (having doubled the arbols the recipe called for).

That the chili was so vastly improved after two days of sitting makes me wonder about the logic of chili cook-offs or if special preparations might be required for them vs normal chili. They still sound very fun.

No Wave fucked around with this message at Jan 22, 2018 around 19:20

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



My work comp winners were both let to sit in the fridge 2 days ahead of time for this very reason. Everyone else was doing theirs the night before.

Hurt Whitey Maybe
Jun 26, 2008

I mean maybe not. Or maybe. Definitely don't kill anyone.


I made chili last night, decided to go as simple as I could.

Basically took 3lbs of chuck chunks (they were on sale!), way over flower them, and then basically pan fry them. This turned out real well, they had an insane crust compared to previous efforts.

In the mean time I cooked down two onions, some seasoned salt and half a stick of butter until the onions were nearly brown, then tossed in a couple of heads of garlic of peeled garlic. Then I added some pureed chipotles and a single can of tomatoes, a couple cans of PBR (my mom always used cheap beer for chili, none of this more than a $1/can bullshit) a bunch of worchestshire sauce, and some A1 Bold and Spicy (I like it). I hit that all with a hand blender until it was smooth, then dumped in the meat and brought it to a boil.

From there I just treated it like a braise and kept it in the oven for two hours with the lid on the pot, then took off the lid for another half hour to reduce.

Was pretty happy with how it turned out, although I might have thrown in some more peppers for heat next time.

Bob Morales
Aug 18, 2006

This post is good to go


Ranter posted:

My work comp winners were both let to sit in the fridge 2 days ahead of time for this very reason. Everyone else was doing theirs the night before.

My chili always loses all the heat after sitting in the fridge for a day.

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



That's... odd.

fermun
Nov 4, 2009

The X-Files will return in a moment.



Maybe he means temperature instead of spiciness. Bob, do you mean temperature, not spiciness?

Plinkey
Aug 4, 2004

Can't we all just be friends?



I mean, it makes sense.

No Wave
Sep 18, 2005

Yogg-Saron fan #1


I found mine lost some heat after sitting in the fridge, as well. I assume the thickening of the sauce had something to do with it. You can always add more arbols if you'd like it hotter. My chili was actively bad - chunks of meat and little onion pieces in spicy chicken stock - before it sat in the fridge. I won't even touch it pre-48 hours next time.

No Wave fucked around with this message at Jan 23, 2018 around 13:56

Ranter
Jul 11, 2004



Nothing is being added when it sits in the fridge. Thickening doesn't somehow cut down on the amount of capsaicin. And I'm certain there's no new chemical reaction happening as the food gets colder to change the capsaicin level. My only guess is you're skimming off some of the fat as it's cooled and are removing some there.

It's gotta be a joke/play on words.

Bob Morales
Aug 18, 2006

This post is good to go


I mean heat as in spiciness. Of course the temperature will go down...

Anyway, I usually use like 7-8 jalapenos, a spoonfull of chipotle pepper+sauce from the can, and then chili powder, a splash of cayenne...not the hottest in the world but when I eat a bowl for dinner that day it usually makes the top of my head sweat a little bit.

I don't remove any fat, leftovers go to a pyrex dish to cool on the counter and then into the fridge over night. I warm it up at work the next day (add a touch of water but that's it) and it's just not spicy at all.

Somehow it tames out after sitting.

Tezcatlipoca
Sep 18, 2009
https://i.imgur.com/xhkDqVS.jpg

Goons are trash and a putrid forum culture is the reason why nobody new registers. At best you're 30+ year old failed twitter "comedians" and tolerate this pig because he has the same normie sports hobby as you do.


Oils and fats coat the mouth and protect against capsacin. That's why drinking milk helps to temporarily soothe chili burn.

Your chili needs something besides jalapenos or it's going to be flat. Your base should be a dark, earthy chili like ancho or pasilla. There are hundreds of types of chilis and they all burn differently so use a bunch of different types.




The last chili I made with bbq brisket. I cubed it, browned it and threw in the chunks near the end of the cook and it's drat amazing.

Tezcatlipoca fucked around with this message at Jan 23, 2018 around 17:17

Elizabethan Error
May 18, 2006

hello. i spent ten bucks to remove your angrytar and i hope this happy bunny helps you relax and be your best self. if that will not work, maybe have some brownies. brownies are good. ok, bye

Tezcatlipoca posted:

Oils and fats coat the mouth and protect against capsacin. That's why drinking milk helps to temporarily soothe chili burn.
this isn't accurate, sorry. capsaicin is itself an oil, and milk helps with spiciness because it binds to fats.

Tezcatlipoca
Sep 18, 2009
https://i.imgur.com/xhkDqVS.jpg

Goons are trash and a putrid forum culture is the reason why nobody new registers. At best you're 30+ year old failed twitter "comedians" and tolerate this pig because he has the same normie sports hobby as you do.


You're right, it is oil soluble.

neogeo0823
Jul 4, 2007

NO THAT'S NOT ME!!


In that vein, anecdotally, I once beat something(I forget what it was now. I think a bacon wrapped pepper of some type?) that was way too spicy by quickly swishing some cooking oil in in my mouth and spitting that out. Felt gross as hell, but completely preferable to

Tezcatlipoca
Sep 18, 2009
https://i.imgur.com/xhkDqVS.jpg

Goons are trash and a putrid forum culture is the reason why nobody new registers. At best you're 30+ year old failed twitter "comedians" and tolerate this pig because he has the same normie sports hobby as you do.


Probably a jalapeño popper in which case

hhhmmm
Jan 1, 2006
...?

Today i seared my chili in a very hot pan once it was done. The result was absolutely amazing. The flavor profiles were better and there was more texture.

In more detail: So i made my chili in the usual ways, cooking odd cuts of meat for very long and then adding vegetables ~two hours before the cooking was done.
At the end of cooking, I'm left with a very delicious brown substance. But this time i poured the results into a very hot pan, ~250 grams at a time, for about 2-3 minutes. Which sears some of the meat and gets rid of any remaining water.

I have experimented with searing the meat before it goes into the pan, and that does makes a difference sometimes. But searing the chilii at the end makes a better difference.

bewbies
Sep 23, 2003

Bo?


Fun Shoe

i would like to discuss chili colorado

There's an otherwise unremarkable mexican place here that does it INCREDIBLY well. i'm pretty sure they make the gravy, and then sear some meat real quick and toss it in (as they offer chicken/pork/steak options)

The gravy, I think, is just stock, chilis, and maybe garlic? i always get the steak and i think it is just tri tip or something else lean.

does anyone have any further information on this? it is like the most perfectly simplistic chili i've ever experienced and I'm becoming obsessed with it.

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Bob Morales
Aug 18, 2006

This post is good to go


bewbies posted:

i would like to discuss chili colorado

There's an otherwise unremarkable mexican place here that does it INCREDIBLY well. i'm pretty sure they make the gravy, and then sear some meat real quick and toss it in (as they offer chicken/pork/steak options)

The gravy, I think, is just stock, chilis, and maybe garlic? i always get the steak and i think it is just tri tip or something else lean.

does anyone have any further information on this? it is like the most perfectly simplistic chili i've ever experienced and I'm becoming obsessed with it.

We're Texas Mexicans. My dad makes this with pork steaks. I've made it with chuck steak it's basically the same deal.

Get the biggest pan you have. Heat some vegetable oil up in it. salt/pepper some pork steaks and then coat them in flour and fry em up. Don't cook them all the way, though, just turn them nice and brown. Remove and put on a plate.

Take that same pan and throw 1/4 a container of chili powder in it. Toast it up for a few minutes. If you want to, buy dried chilis and use those but we never do it that way.


(again this is what we use, but 2 tbsp of chili powder should do the trick)

Stir it around while it's on the stove. Then you add 2 cups of water. Stir it all up so there's no more lumps. It will thicken up because of the grease/flour leftover. Add garlic powder and a bit fat pinch of Mexican oregano. Put the pork chops back in, and add more water to cover the meat. Let it cook for...at least 45 minutes (if you do chuck roast, cook the meat by itself for an extra hour or two because it will take longer to get tender before you add the sauce). Salt and pepper to taste.

Optional, but I add 1 yellow onion, cut in half. Slice up a bell pepper and throw that in as well. Small can of stewed tomatoes.

Serve with a pile of flour tortillas. The best ones are where you wipe the rest of the gravy up out of the pan with a tortilla and just eat it.

Bob Morales fucked around with this message at Apr 16, 2018 around 18:42

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