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HoneyBoy
Oct 12, 2012

get murked son

I only read Beast Wars and knew exactly what you were going to say. A lot of Dinobot's lines were either references or quotes from Shakespeare works, the line you mentioned is a reference to Hamlet I think. I think it's even more dramatic in that he saved essentially an early species of proto-humans, which Optimus then confirms as he says he saved the lives of those who live there and those to come, modern humans.

Anyway, your avatar reminded me of a pretty good one that got me when I first watched it, Watership Down.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMvGUCTpCIY

That's a link to the ending, so spoilers obviously. But really the whole film was rife with great writing and amazing quotables, the rabbit's folklore and theology was beautiful.

quote:

My heart has joined the thousand, for my friend stopped running today.

Don't even get me started on Plague Dogs.

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spite house
Apr 28, 2009



This ruined my life today at work. I had to go weep in the bathroom.

A soldier's suicide note. It isn't my favorite anything. It is horrible.

Hollismason
Jun 30, 2007

"Real life is messy, inconsistent, and it's seldom when anything ever really gets resolved."

First time I remember masterbating and ejaculating semen , I thought I broke my penis and I got really upset cried a little and told my Dad. Who asked what the gently caress don't ever tell me that and why are you not learning about this in school?

Snowglobe of Doom
Mar 30, 2012

Because if I tell you, you'll tell your friends, your friends are callin' me on the horn all the time, I gotta show up at shopping centers for openings and sign autographs and shit like that and it makes my life a *hell*. Okay? A living hell.


Fan of Britches

spite house posted:

This ruined my life today at work. I had to go weep in the bathroom.

A soldier's suicide note. It isn't my favorite anything. It is horrible.

Oh goddamn.

psyopmonkey
Nov 15, 2008

by Lowtax


I learned a couple years ago that one of the guys I went to SWTG with had died. Ive had lots of friends die but for some reason this guys death really got to me.

http://projects.militarytimes.com/v...ecoteau/4490611

Every time I think about my time at Ft. Bragg I think about this super dorky, very sperg'tastic guy, who was a great human being. But, hes dead now.

Cowslips Warren
Oct 29, 2005

What use had they for tricks and cunning, living in the enemy's warren and paying his price?


Grimey Drawer

HoneyBoy posted:

I only read Beast Wars and knew exactly what you were going to say. A lot of Dinobot's lines were either references or quotes from Shakespeare works, the line you mentioned is a reference to Hamlet I think. I think it's even more dramatic in that he saved essentially an early species of proto-humans, which Optimus then confirms as he says he saved the lives of those who live there and those to come, modern humans.

Anyway, your avatar reminded me of a pretty good one that got me when I first watched it, Watership Down.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMvGUCTpCIY

That's a link to the ending, so spoilers obviously. But really the whole film was rife with great writing and amazing quotables, the rabbit's folklore and theology was beautiful.


Don't even get me started on Plague Dogs.

The worst part about the Watership Down movie was the lack of Strawberry. In the book he joins Hazel and crew because his doe is killed in a snare.

Season 2 of BeastWars was pretty rough. One of the few parts in Season 1 that got me was the floating island and we can't forget Tigatron's words: May I be forgiven for what I must do.

And yes, Dinobot's last words "The rest is silence" is from Hamlet.

The Candyman
Aug 19, 2010

by T. Finninho


Old Sherlock Holmes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pp02ubGuTIU

Dave Concepcion
Mar 19, 2012


A dog named Beau

Koivunen
Oct 7, 2011

there's definitely no logic
to human behaviour

http://www.wimp.com/yearslove/

What 66 years of love looks like - a couple singing to each other.

Farecoal
Oct 15, 2011

There he go


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BArFeuszzWs

I have no idea how something derived from goddamn Garfield made me cry, but man oh man it did

Rockii
Mar 5, 2013

It's Mr. Steal Yo Power

every time I watch this video, read this book, or even think about this story I'm a emotional wreck for at least 40 minutes afterward
Love You Forever by Robert Munsch
http://youtu.be/TXcIjqyUYk0

Lencho
Mar 16, 2012



I know it's an old thread but...
This post from Rashaverak on the EMS Stories thread in GBS is absolutely soulcrushing. Some other goon asked him if it was easier to emotionally deal responding to some horrible scene when the victim was dead:

Rashaverak posted:

I'm not quite sure what you mean - easier emotionally? Not much bothers me anymore, and the stuff that does isn't trauma, it's sexually abused children... and now that I work in a pediatric hospital I'm even becoming enured to that. People always want stories of blood, guts, and gore - but that's the mundane, boring reality of EMS.

The things that get to you, that reach you on a deeper, human level, well... It's the full arrest toned out at 0630, just before shift change, where you're cursing your bad luck, cursing your partner for always being late, and trying to find a reason why some other truck is closer to the call than you are. Where you walk to the house and hope it's an easy call and there's obvious signs incompatible with life, so you can get the hell out of there and back to your bottle at home.

Where you're greeted at the door by an old man who looks like he's at death's door himself, dressed in his sad little boxers clearly a decade old and his stained white nightshirt that his wife was too polite and too deeply in love to complain about... his shoulders stooped by age and the knowledge of what's to come. Where you walk through the entrance hallway, past pictures of children and grandchildren long since grown, past an aged and yellowing photo of a young couple deeply in love, she beaming in her wedding dress and he standing proud in his Army uniform - and into the bedroom of a couple who've been married to each other through poo poo and sunshine, for 60 years.

Her perfume and makeup is neatly arranged on the dresser below the flag they were given when their son never came back from Vietnam. He'd lined up her medication bottles in the order she'd take them every day, and his glasses sat nearby so he could read the large print on the labels. She didn't always remember to take them all, and for that matter neither did he, but every night before bed they'd tell each other "I love you" because it might be the last time they did... and today, it was.

You see all this, and you hardly notice the still, silent shape beneath the sheets.

He didn't bother to uncover her, because he knew.

He woke up, and he just knew. He knew in the same way I'd known when I opened the door and saw him standing there. He'd known this day would come but hoped it'd be him we saw in that bed. Hoped he wouldn't have to go through this but known it was coming. Not that it helped, of course. The man who'd charged that hill in Korea, who'd been shot and stabbed and goddamnit just got back up and kept loving going, was standing by the doorway to the bedroom they'd shared for half a century softly weeping.

You go through the motions, of course. You look for breathing and feel for a pulse, her skin already cold and pale, her neck already stiffening a bit. You see the the dependent lividity - the blood pooling in her skin and discoloring - but the coldly clinical words are little comfort. You say the words he knew were coming but that doesn't make it any easier. He's already stopped listening anyways. His eyes and his mind are far away, probably recalling what it felt like when he flipped that veil over and kissed her, or the secret night they'd shared six months before they were married by shotgun.

Thinking back to the walls of smiling children, you ask if there's anyone you can call for him. Surely, the kids they spent their life raising are going to descend upon him, taking away the heavy burden that now sits upon his shoulders.

They don't call anymore. They don't visit.

He gives you the number of her physician and the number of the funeral home where they picked out a plot a few years back when her health started to go downhill. You stay around as long as you can, standing by him as that van comes to take his wife away from their home for the last time, and eventually there's nothing left to do but leave.

You know.

A week after the funeral, when you get the call from an annoyed neighbor complaining about a bad smell, you know.

You go inside, because that's what you have to do, but you already know. Past the wall of children who no longer cared about anything except who was in the will, past the flag, past her perfume and makeup still sitting there in the same place, and find a still shape, laying in the other side of the bed.

You don't bother to uncover him, because you already know.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I'm sitting in a bar right now as I write this, trying to study for my calculus midterm so I can get the hell out of this profession, and I'm having to stop writing because I'm crying so hard. You get lots of strange looks, but they're par for the course. Some calls you forget before you even clear the hospital, and others will stay with you until you draw your last breath.

DicktheCat
Feb 15, 2011



Recently, I've gotten up to Episode 25 in Welcome to Nightvale. I was just listening along, and he got to the point at the end, in the parkinglot. For some reason, the mixture of the profound and mundane just sent me squalling. It was just such a beautiful moment, actually truly poignant, on this silly little comedy podcast.

This is just recently, though. I'm just a softie, and it made me think of my own fiance and I, those wonderful days, the moment when two people finally really connect... haha, sorry, I got lost there a moment.

Sex Hobbit
Jul 24, 2007

because we are cat


"The Ship Song" by Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds has had me ugly crying for a couple days now.

Come sail your ships around me, and burn your bridges down...

Ana Lucia Cortez
Mar 22, 2008



Sorry for reviving this old thread but I wanted to share this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mtZhEiH2Zg

The ending to Homeward Bound. Just remembered it this morning when I was showing my son Youtube videos. "Hey I used to watch this movie when I was little, let's watch a clip." A minute later I'm bawling.

Ledgy
Aug 1, 2013

Up against the wall


Into the Wild. The whole movie.

Tony Bologna
Sep 21, 2007

Talk real good 'cause I'm smart and stuff


If we're gonna revive this thread, I'm gonna post a song song that tears me up because my father listened to it almost non-stop after his mother died:

Crack the Sky - "Long Nights"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRAjc-tgUu0

It's not exactly about losing your mother, but maybe because we are kind of an emotionally repressed family, but the image of my father, sitting in his Dodge Caravan at night, listening to this song and contemplating the crushing loneliness of his widowed father makes me cry anytime I hear it.

ZZT the Fifth
Dec 5, 2006
I shot the invisible swordsman.

Pork Pro

This video loving wrecked me; no parent should have to watch a child die before them. The fact that this girl's mother was able to keep herself together enough to write and perform a song for her on her deathbed... I can't really put into words what I'm feeling.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVjmihgZp1U

Pocket Billiards
Aug 29, 2007
.

Sex Hobbit posted:

"The Ship Song" by Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds has had me ugly crying for a couple days now.

Come sail your ships around me, and burn your bridges down...

It's pretty cheerful by Nick Cave standards, the message at least. Go hog wild when arguing, clean the slate and then make up.

Teach
Mar 28, 2008



Pillbug

This is probably a repost - the article was published in February this year - but Tom Junod's profile of Mister Rogers in Esquire magazine is just a great read. It's a long article - grab a coffee. Then count up the number of times you welled up.

http://www.esquire.com/features/can...ay-hero-esq1198

(I'm British. I've never seen Mister Rogers on TV. And it still got me.)

Hakkesshu
Nov 3, 2009



Teach posted:

This is probably a repost - the article was published in February this year - but Tom Junod's profile of Mister Rogers in Esquire magazine is just a great read. It's a long article - grab a coffee. Then count up the number of times you welled up.

http://www.esquire.com/features/can...ay-hero-esq1198

(I'm British. I've never seen Mister Rogers on TV. And it still got me.)

Yeah, I've never seen an episode of Mister Rogers either, but it's really easy to see how he became such an icon. That Nixon hearing that probably everyone has seen by now is really touching and incredible.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXEuEUQIP3Q

Hakkesshu has a new favorite as of 10:19 on Jun 12, 2014

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Buggiezor
Jun 6, 2011

For I am a cat, you see.


I know it's not Christmas, but this ad came out this past year and it gets me every time no matter how many times I watch it.
The Bear and the Hare
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqWig2WARb0

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