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CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Meow Cadet posted:

Should I memorize these lines since I have them in advance? Or is it best to just semi-cold read them?
If you have them ahead of time you can look them over, figure out the context of the scene and then make notes to yourself what kind of emotional intensity you want to bring to each line. It also saves you from putting in odd emPHASis on SOme of THE woRDS because you haven't read the senTENCE before. You'll sound smooth as hell if you have read the copy several times and made whatever little notes you need.

Meow Cadet posted:

'Back in the day' I would do a bunch of goofy vocal warm-up exercises before a performance. These vocal warm-ups often integrated body warm-ups as well. Do you VO people do that too? Anyone have a link to some more modern exercises?
Your voice is your instrument. Tune it up before you perform. You may want to save the really obnoxious high-low or low-high do-re-mi stuff for your car. Also lots of "yawns" and other seriously loud stupid poo poo are really really great in your car, far away from prying ears. Then you can show up, clear your throat, get some water and be ready to work.


Meow Cadet posted:

Also, I've never really used a microphone before. (Except for one terrible VO video game audition in 1992) Do I put myself right on top of the mic? Or away from it a few inches? Or any tips?
Ask the person recording how they want you to interact with the mic. There are different mics out there that will determine how far away you are. It's super easy for you, you just ask.

Keep yourself squarely facing the mic so that as you read the copy you don't duck your head into your chest or turn away to the side. Hopefully they have a hanging mic or one that's in a comfy position so you can easily read the copy without having to do too many gymnastics.

Have a great time!

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The Joe Man
Apr 7, 2007

Flirting With Apathetic Waitresses Since 1984

Camo Guitar posted:

Hey guys and girls - If anyone's looking for practice, here's a promo script you can sink your teeth into for something/our next 'cost us nothing' stunt we've got coming up in a week or two:


It’s the Star Fm Garage Sale of Awesome.

The Star Fm Garage Sale of Awesome. As the name suggests, it’s a garage sale, full of awesome.

If the Titanic had a garage sale, it wouldn’t come close to the Star Fm Garage Sale of Awesome.

The Star Fm Garage Sale – more than just fifty cent books and broken toys.


In the latest of their crazy ideas, Al and A.D have decided to take your typical garage sale…and inject it with two tonnes of pure unfiltered awesomeness.
It’s the Star Fm Garage Sale of Awesome where daily the boys will swap prizes for your garage sale goodies.
And in the end of it, one lucky winner will be able to sell all their collected crap…er…great stuff at their own garage sale for maximum profit!
Parts to a Magna? Baby clothes? A whole heap of VHS tapes?
Who knows what they’ll end up with!
Find out more on the station that gets its crazy ideas from deep within the bargain bin, 91.9 Star Fm!


And hell if you want to post up your efforts, go for it. Without any production budget we can't offer any money (we could send you a maccas dinner box but it's only good for this town so it doesn't help) but if we end up using any of your stuff, we'll email through a produced version for your own portfolio. With processing, music and stuff that sounds good. Which might get you hired for the voice of an autobot in Transformers 4 or something. Any questions, just shoot.


Tried the Technobabble script late last night but kept sliding into a Yosemite Sam voice for some reason?

I have a fun direction in mind for it so I'll give it another shot at some point.

Camo Guitar
Jul 15, 2009


Incredulous Dylan posted:

I had some fun with this one! Little did I know due to my headphones being on that the girl scouts were calling around the neighborhood and every dog decided to freak out on most of my little takes

Anyway, here's a dog-free take in my "giving away a car" voice not meant for big serious radio!



optional comedy option take after I totally lost my low end at the end



Nothing like a little puking DJ voice in the evening. Also are you supposed to do these in one go?! Put any energy into it and boy am I out of air

You actually sound like a newsreader, which really is not a bad thing at all

Couple of tricks to help out - breath. If you need to take a breath, do it. At the end of each sentence, breathe. We have so many people that walk into the booth thinking they have to go from start to finish in one take without drawing breath, it's amazing. Stop when you need to, catch your breath (it takes a while to get used to) and try to approach each sentence with the same energy you started the piece with. A bottle of water handy is a very good idea.

One thing I encourage clients voicing ads to do is imagine the emotion of being at their favourite sporting event with 2 seconds to spare before it ends and their favourite player has just scored the winning goal/point/whatever. With that feeling in mind, people brighten right up.

And whoever mentioned smiling through a piece is bang on. Grin. Grin like there's no tomorrow. Grin til your face hurts. It's hard holding a grin from start to finish so when you breath, reset that grin and kick on. Compare a non grin bit of work to one where you've held a confident grin the entire time and you'll see a very noticable and positive difference. With more of a grin you'll put more of you in each line and less newsreader.

However...I'm using your first bit as a newsreader anyway in our promo (because sometimes you hear something and think 'hey, that'd work much better!' so well done ) so I'll post it up shortly.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Camo Guitar posted:

Actually we're a commercial radio station in a provincial gold mining town

And your read was quite awesome - clear and concise with plenty of fun.

Thank you very much! Hahah I can't wait to see what you do with it.

Woah, just looked up your station. I'm grinning even bigger now imagining how jarring my voice is going to sound to your audience. Hahah, outstanding!

Camo Guitar
Jul 15, 2009


As promised, I present: Voiceover goons in action!



With huge thanks to the contributors:
Incredulous Dylan Smoothly kicks things off with a news report
Cuddlechunks explains how it works with plenty of flair and emotion in the middle.
And The Joe Man ends it with a great voice that wouldn't be out of place on Monster Garage.

3 different voices that were all clear, flowed well and had their own unique take on the script. Well done guys, awesome stuff and thanks for helping me make this promo!

Incredulous Dylan
Oct 22, 2004



Fun Shoe

Hah, thanks for posting that up! That flows awesomely well - you've got to be used to throwing a million of these together by now I take it? I am really loving all of the awesome advice in this thread. Glad to see it becoming our goon go-to for learning what's up

Incredulous Dylan fucked around with this message at Feb 8, 2012 around 01:49

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Ahahahahahaha it's even more wonderful than I could have hoped for. I hope your garage sale goes well! (on 91.9, Star FM)


For everyone that's done the Retroencabulator script, check out the gold standard for that horrendous bit of doggerel. This guy is *smooth* and he sells all that bullshit terminology in one glorious flow of technobabble.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIS5n9Oyzsc

CuddleChunks fucked around with this message at Feb 8, 2012 around 03:36

Stinkmeister
Sep 20, 2004



Lipstick Apathy

Thanks everyone for the feedback so far! Here's another take at Summerset Hills:



Here's the first one for comparison:



I think it's a vast improvement in technique, although I was experimenting with mic placement, and you can hear the room a lot more in it, which is probably not so good. Still struggling with the 's' sound (drat your safe and secluded streets), but I feel it's coming along. I welcome any critique.

Maide
Aug 21, 2008

There's a Starman waiting in the sky...


It sounds much better than your first, but I believe you took a lot of breaks and continued a few setences which broke the flow. If it isn't you recording new tracks, and is just you editing out excesses noise during pauses, I would recommend fading out the pauses, and fading in slightly as well. While your actual voice is much better, your recording still doesn't sound very natural.

robodex
Jun 6, 2007

They're what's for dinner


One thing I find really helps when doing reads is printing off the script and marking it yourself. Mark things like emphasis, where you want your voice to rise/fall, even where you breathe. It's up to you how exactly to mark it up; whatever you're comfortable with is best. But I find when reading scripts/lines it's a lot easier to map everything out on the page rather than trying to remember how you wanted to read the script. (Especially on breaths--I've read copy before that has had some stupidly long sentences, and it has helped me immensely marking exactly where I thought the best places to breathe was.)

[edit] Also, it turns out my roommate has some pretty nice mics due to music stuff so I might try to steal some from him and contribute to the thread. It's been about six months since I've done voice stuff so I'm pretty rusty but this thread has sparked my interest to go again

Darwinspeaks
Oct 15, 2010

You have failed to impress the hippo. Good day.


Camo Guitar posted:

As promised, I present: Voiceover goons in action!



With huge thanks to the contributors:
Incredulous Dylan Smoothly kicks things off with a news report
Cuddlechunks explains how it works with plenty of flair and emotion in the middle.
And The Joe Man ends it with a great voice that wouldn't be out of place on Monster Garage.

3 different voices that were all clear, flowed well and had their own unique take on the script. Well done guys, awesome stuff and thanks for helping me make this promo!

Sweet, Nice work goons - lets get ready to SELL STUFF!

Meow Cadet
May 2, 2007


friendship is magic
in a pony paradise
don't you judge me

Well I auditioned on Saturday for that video game role. I was surprised that it wasn't in a recording studio, but in an annex of a local theatre. They were running a bit behind and I got to see 2-3 other girls and a guy audition before me. That was a little weird, but at the same time kinda nice to ease the nerves.

I read my sides, was a bit more 'theatrical' than the other people I saw auditioning, not sure if that was good or bad. They also gave me a short monologue to cold read (although I saw the other girls do it). I tripped over a word, my childhood speech impediment decided to show up while I was trying to say the word "dark" of all things. But I just powered through it and didn't stop (but went back to reread that sentence). One of the other girls messed up, and had to stop and restart the whole thing while giggling and laughing and apologizing. In my mind, time is money baby!

Anyway, long story short, I got 2 parts! Not the lead, but 1 small role of someone that gets killed, and one larger role that will be in all 4 episodes of this game, with a email confirmation that they will hire me for all 4 episodes.

$100 for 2 hours-max of work. Not bad. I record this week or next, not sure yet.

Anyway, thanks for the tips!

edit: $100 for 2 hours of work sounds great to me, but I'm wondering if that's a normal rate. What do you commercial guys get, typically? (I know it's not about the money, I'm just curious)

Meow Cadet fucked around with this message at Feb 13, 2012 around 09:29

Ishamael
Feb 18, 2004

You don't have to love me, but you will respect me.

Meow Cadet posted:


edit: $100 for 2 hours of work sounds great to me, but I'm wondering if that's a normal rate. What do you commercial guys get, typically? (I know it's not about the money, I'm just curious)

For videogames, it depends. For local and national TV spots, I have set rates based on the final length of the piece ($x for a 30 sec. spot, $y for a 60 sec., etc.)

For web videos, I charge by the minute. I don't have my rate sheet with me at the moment, but it is also dependent on the final length of the piece, or at least the final length of my section.

Videogames are the most fun things I do in the VO world, but they are also the most variable in terms of pay. I have done jobs where I do several hours of work for $100, and I have done jobs where I get $300 per half-hour of work. It really depends on the game, the size of the game studio, and the people you are working for. Also, when you are starting out, just take what you can get and add it to your reel!

Roberto_Silencio
Mar 9, 2004

lets start advertising and make us some real money

Voicing is something I've been interested in for a while. I was inspired to finally record something, a poem from the D&D new Reddit thread about the recent child porn fiasco. OldTennisCourt wrote a poem based on Poe's The Raven and I decided to give it a shot.

I know there's a lot of things wrong with it, a crappy mic for starters and being that it's after midnight, I had to be a bit quieter than I'd have liked so I didn't wake the neighbors and slight pacing problem, but since there's this thread, here we go.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Roberto_Silencio posted:

I know there's a lot of things wrong with it, a crappy mic for starters and being that it's after midnight, I had to be a bit quieter than I'd have liked so I didn't wake the neighbors and slight pacing problem, but since there's this thread, here we go.



Hahah nice text to read from. You have a good beginning and the background music fits nicely. You already know your microphone doesn't sound very good and that hurts the quality of the piece. It also sounds like you're too close or the levels are too hot and so the pops are really prominent and the peak levels sound like they are clipping. A new mic would fix some of that, sitting back a bit when recording and having a pop guard would fix the rest.

The pacing of the piece made it harder to understand the emotion behind several of the lines. It's okay to take a little longer to say words. Something I've observed from listening to a *ton* of old time radio and audio books is that the reader is actually.....speaking.....each.....word....at...a...much.....slower....pace....than....you....think.

It takes your brain a little bit to decode the words and put a sentence together so slowing your delivery down gives people time to catch up with what you are saying.

Listen carefully to Vincent Price read The Raven http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27ZvwQd-wXw and you can hear each word and the space he gives them. The slower delivery also gives you a chance to wrap your mouth around the words and give some passages more emphasis or to really get dramatic with each syllable of the word.

Roberto_Silencio
Mar 9, 2004

lets start advertising and make us some real money

CuddleChunks posted:

Things!

Yeah, sadly the mic I have right now is a headphone mic, did a few test runs trying to put it in a place where it wouldn't catch breath from "hard" sounds, but a bunch still snuck through. I'll probably consider buying a better one soon though. Thanks for the tips! I'll probably end up reading The Raven itself a few times in the same style voice for practice and maybe go back and find some other dialog from this thread here for other styles.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Roberto_Silencio posted:

Yeah, sadly the mic I have right now is a headphone mic

I'm not sure if it's actually clipping or is just a headset mic but try turning the input volume down so that your record levels are a little lower. Set the input slider to half of its current position and re-record a chunk of text. Check it out after recording and see how it actually sounds. Fiddling with the gain may make it work a little better.

For an excellent story try "The Retired Colourman" http://www.archive.org/details/HQSherlockRathboneTCS Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce star as Sherlock Holmes and Watson. They are *pros* for vocal work. Rathbone has severe, clipped tones while Bruce is a mumbly, upper class Brit. Despite his blumph blumph blumph voice, he is usually quite clear for his narration sections.

One thing you can do is pause a section, type up the words they are saying, rewind and then play it through. It should help illustrate how they spend a *lot* more time on each word than you do when reading the text in your head. They demonstrate vocal dynamics (louder and softer sections), emotive reading and other techniques. If you can get anywhere near what they did then you are heading in the right direction. This is from the 40's at the height of radio's popularity. In my opinion, these guys are among the many great radio performers of that age. Rathbone in particular gets to flex his vocal muscles in other episodes when he plays different characters. It's all great stuff.

No matter what, practice practice practice! E/N is a great forum for finding seriously goofy passages to read. If you then use a mocking tone and throw in some effects you can be a real rear end in a top hat. If the OP completely freaks out then you can chalk it up to a job well done.

TheProdigalGoon
Feb 14, 2012

Are you prepared for the kind of death you've earned, little man?

Fallen Rib

Leofish posted:

Script

Looks fun! I'll take a whack at Slate when my next-door neighbors decide to stop their little domestic. Christ, I hate apartment complexes.

EDIT: Okay, the more I worked on this the more I was unsatisfied with it, but I went ahead and finished it up anyway. Apologies about the gating, cheap mic.

TheProdigalGoon fucked around with this message at Feb 20, 2012 around 23:57

The Joe Man
Apr 7, 2007

Flirting With Apathetic Waitresses Since 1984

Sorry I've been away from the thread for awhile but it doesn't really look like a problem! Great advice from folks so far. I'll be buying some banner ads in the next few in order to drum up some requests.

Mutant Headcrab
May 14, 2007


Name: Mutant Headcrab

Specialties: Narration, Sports Caster/News Announcer style readings, a sleight smattering of impersonations, things that might one day kill my throat

Tindeck: http://tindeck.com/users/Mutant+Headcrab

Contact: PMs or E-Mail (mutantheadcrab at gmail.com)

Payment: Pay-Pal
---------------------------

Now, I'll say this right off the bat, that I'm new to this whole phenomenon and thought I'd give it a try in this thread. People I know tell me I've got a good voice, but I have severe doubts. Who better to judge than my fellow goons? Especially since there are a good deal of people in this thread who know what they're talking about.

So I thought I'd give that Retro-encabulator bit a try.

ATwoSlotToaster
Nov 6, 2004

You're toast!

Just searched for a thread like this, it is exactly what I need exactly when I need it! I finally got a phone inbox for my drum company and my voice message just plain sucks balls. I'm looking for anyone with decent vocals to get me a professionally sounding outgoing message.

Length: n/a

Due: ASAP, my voice just does not do my company justice.

Notes: "B Meson" is pronounced "Bee Mess On". The web address can be said the same way. Can you read the lines a few times so I have enough to edit around with, thanks.

Script: "You have reached B Meson Custom Percussion. You've reached the inbox of B Meson Custom Percussion. Please leave your name and number first followed by a brief message. Custom drum quotes can be received online through our website at bmeson.com. https://www.bmeson.com. Thanks for your call. Thank you for your call. We'll return your call promptly. Be Inspired, Be Unique, B Meson. Have a nice day. Thank you. 315-451-7282."

Pay: I dont have paypal but I'd like to pay $10 to the one I finally use. I think you can send me an invoice or something. But I also don't want to get someones hopes up if I don't use it, it needs to be fairly good.

Camo Guitar
Jul 15, 2009


ATwoSlotToaster posted:

Just searched for a thread like this, it is exactly what I need exactly when I need it! I finally got a phone inbox for my drum company and my voice message just plain sucks balls. I'm looking for anyone with decent vocals to get me a professionally sounding outgoing message.

Length: n/a

Due: ASAP, my voice just does not do my company justice.

Notes: "B Meson" is pronounced "Bee Mess On". The web address can be said the same way. Can you read the lines a few times so I have enough to edit around with, thanks.

Script: "You have reached B Meson Custom Percussion. You've reached the inbox of B Meson Custom Percussion. Please leave your name and number first followed by a brief message. Custom drum quotes can be received online through our website at bmeson.com. https://www.bmeson.com. Thanks for your call. Thank you for your call. We'll return your call promptly. Be Inspired, Be Unique, B Meson. Have a nice day. Thank you. 315-451-7282."

Pay: I dont have paypal but I'd like to pay $10 to the one I finally use. I think you can send me an invoice or something. But I also don't want to get someones hopes up if I don't use it, it needs to be fairly good.

I'm game, try this one (Hopefully I've got the B-mess-on right..)

ATwoSlotToaster
Nov 6, 2004

You're toast!

That was awesome! I loved it. Is there any way you can just do the lines with the "B Meson" in it and try it with a little more of the "O" in meson. (Right now it sounds more like "Mesan" or "mesin" if that makes sense.) I already know i'm gonna use yours so this would make it perfect!

Send me an invoice to prfblakley@gmail.com for $15, you've done good sir!

Edit: any chance you can PM me your email? I might just get in touch later with some more work too.

ATwoSlotToaster fucked around with this message at Feb 22, 2012 around 01:10

Camo Guitar
Jul 15, 2009


ATwoSlotToaster posted:

That was awesome! I loved it. Is there any way you can just do the lines with the "B Meson" in it and try it with a little more of the "O" in meson. (Right now it sounds more like "Mesan" or "mesin" if that makes sense.) I already know i'm gonna use yours so this would make it perfect!

Send me an invoice to prfblakley@gmail.com for $15, you've done good sir!

Edit: any chance you can PM me your email? I might just get in touch later with some more work too.

Sure can - here you go!



I'll shoot through the invoice later today but in the meantime if you need anything just let me know via Al@almigoproductions.com (as I don't have PM's)

ATwoSlotToaster
Nov 6, 2004

You're toast!

Camo Guitar posted:

Sure can - here you go!



I'll shoot through the invoice later today but in the meantime if you need anything just let me know via Al@almigoproductions.com (as I don't have PM's)

Awesome, that is right on! Thanks so much, I'll be in touch I'm sure!

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Mutant Headcrab posted:

Name: Mutant Headcrab
So I thought I'd give that Retro-encabulator bit a try.


1. Turn your recording levels down. What I hear happening is as you get louder you are peaking out what the mic can record causing it to clip. This makes many parts of your speech sound fuzzier than they should. It sounds like you're using a cheap mic or a headset or something and that's fine for getting started but learning how to tune your record levels is a critical first step.

2. GRAMMETERS. There is a lot of emphasis put on that particular part, why?

3. Breathing and emphasis within the lines is tricky with this piece. It's a notorious wall of technobabble so this is a good script to take a pencil, read through a section a few times and figure out where you need to breathe. Then, see if you are the end of a line or in the middle of a statement. If you are, you need to figure out where to breathe earlier and *mark your script*. This will show you when to stop after particular passages so that you don't get halfway through a frambulated decrampazoid and <breathe> still need to tell them about the oscillator.

4. Vocal inflection choice. I'd consider this a comic style reading because it sounds like you're going for a 30's or 40's announcer. They often sounded all compressed and shouty because the recording technology just couldn't reproduce the sound for poo poo. Watch a Bugs Bunny cartoon where there is an announcer coming over the radio and you'll hear That Voice. You can simulate it pretty well with some very expensive electronics or by cupping your hands in front of your mouth. Give that a try and see what it sounds like.

The Newsreel Announcer Sound. This is a British newsreel from 1939 and gives you an idea of what those types of announcers sounded like.

The History Eraser Button from Ren and Stimpy. Listen especially to the diction of the announcer and how his overall levels don't change much in his performance. He sounds energetic without shouting.


If you don't mind re-recording that piece, try adjusting your levels and marking up the script so that you know exactly where you want to take a breath. The sentences are meaningless gibberish but they still have to sound like a real life product - that's the purpose of the piece.



Congrats Camo Guitar! Also you sneaky foreigner, comin' in and takin our jorbs!

Camo Guitar
Jul 15, 2009


CuddleChunks posted:


Congrats Camo Guitar! Also you sneaky foreigner, comin' in and takin our jorbs!

I'd take your women too but I'm getting married in April so there goes that idea..

Your American accent is way better than mine will be though so you can have all the American accent jobs over here if you like

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Camo Guitar posted:

I'd take your women too but I'm getting married in April so there goes that idea..

Your American accent is way better than mine will be though so you can have all the American accent jobs over here if you like

Hahah deal. Congrats on your forthcoming nuptials!

Everdraed
Sep 7, 2003

spankety, spankety, spankety


I have a humble request if anybody is interested in doing free work (where you can utilize whatever voice or style that suits your fancy) for an absolutely inane purpose.

Essentially, in the Sonic & Friends Get Trolled thread a comic of... unbelievable quality was posted. I took it upon myself to begin animating it, of which I've done the first page of the first chapter:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oGrprj9D1QI&amp;hd=1

Now, I voiced this first episode as I consider my voice perfect for a hateful troll, but there's a lot of Sonic characters (as well as Elmer Fudd, the Hulk, and others) with... uniquely written dialogue that need to be brought to life. I finished doing the image prep-work for page2, and have a good voice for Shadow (who is a bad hedgehog of some sort that hurts people), but Sonic desperately needs someone to fill his role. Here is page2, and the full comic can be found in the previously linked thread. The specific lines that I need to animate page2 are as follows (this is the correct punctuation):

Tails Gets Trolled - Sonic posted:

he has been getting trolled. you know how it is . there calling tails gay and poo poo he can't take it

the way to stop a troll.is to become his friend .as his friend you can show him the right path

how would you deal with a troll shadow?
While any style or type of voice is absolutely fine (including announcer voices, impersonations of actual Sonic Hedgehogs, or anything you think would be funny), I'd be super grateful if the script was not modified, as I'm animating the text for each panel as it's spoken and I wouldn't want to tread on the original author's creative vision. Sonic tries to be the voice of reason in this comic, but later events cause him to snap. For further motivation, imagine you are a hedgehog who can run very fast, and loves chilli-dogs.

I wish I could pay for the effort, but I'm literally animating this because it makes me laugh, which is the same reason I do most of the things I do. If my laughter could shoot coins into your pockets, believe me I would do so, or maybe I'd just find a way to game it and shoot funny-money into my own clothing, I dunno.

I'll be animating this specific page over the next few days, but if it takes longer for any brave souls who want to attempt this there's no real deadline. If anybody wants to do lines for any of the characters (wouldn't go any farther than the first chapter though), I would greatly appreciate it.

The Joe Man
Apr 7, 2007

Flirting With Apathetic Waitresses Since 1984

Everdraed posted:


If Dr. Robotnik is in this and the voice of "Watto" from that Star Wars movie is acceptable, I could chip in. Robotnik always seemed Russian to me.


Holy crap, it's been over a week! I'll buy advertising soon-ish.

In the meantime: MORE REQUESTS PLEASE!

Zratha
Nov 28, 2004

It's nice to see you

Another voice actor checking in! I have been doing corporate narration for about 3 years now and have recently started doing voice and sound effects for video games. I have a narration demo up but am not done my character one yet.

Name: Zratha

Specialties: Corporate narration, monsters & animals, little kids, old ladies, sci-fi fantasy voices etc.

Tindeck: http://tindeck.com/users/Zratha

Contact: PMs are fine, or post at me in this thread and we can figure it out from there.

Payment: Paypal, money order, Interac money transfer if through a Canadian bank

I currently only have a crappy headset mic so forgive the sound quality on the following

Here is my take on the retroencabulator script


And here is my trying my hand at the part of Jennifer Andrea

topenga
Jul 1, 2003
not Ticonderoga Pencils

It is amazing how my mood improves when I work from home.

So, in the "old stock in stores" thread, genesplicer mentioned finding a can of commodity (government) crushed peanuts. dinozombiesgoRARR made a pretty sweet reply and here is my audio rendition of it. If I sound a little stuffy it's because I am. loving central Texas weather.



The Joe Man
Apr 7, 2007

Flirting With Apathetic Waitresses Since 1984

topenga posted:


This is really stiff, monotone, and boring. You barely got more natural towards the end, but it wasn't enough.

For a reading like this, it's hard to imagine talking to someone directly because it's so scripted. I think the best "out" for this script would be a slightly over-exaggerated reading. Crazed. First thought when buying a can of expired peanuts is "how can I kill someone with this can of expired peanuts?!?"

Did a voice-over role of a haunted house for a student film recently, I'll post it when I see it. I wanted to go full-on Skeletor/Megatron/Murray but they told me to "tone down the evil" and go for a casual/hip/urban sounding house, yet "kinda mean at the same time BUT NOT TOO MEAN!!" Basically, they didn't know what the gently caress they wanted. I think my reading sucked because I constantly had to force myself to hold back on what I knew would actually sound good, purposefully over-the-top, and make the movie unique and funny. As it is now, the thing doesn't even make sense and I just lazily berate a Native American dude for 5 minutes.

Just....just let me go full-on Skeletor....

Sulphuric Sundae
Feb 10, 2006

You can't go in there.
Your father is dead.


Hi, I'm Sulphuric Sundae, and I'm an amateur voice actor.

At one point, a shy 18-year-old me got drafted into doing intercom announcements of specials at my job at a grocery store. So every 30 minutes, every Saturday for like 6 years, I would excitedly tell customers that they could get strawberries for 2 for $4 or Sauer's brand mayo for $1.98. And don't forget to pick up a fresh pecan pie in the bakery today, buy one, get one free! On top of that, I would always volunteer to read aloud in school. Years of that really helped me work on my natural speaking voice. In the days before internet distribution became mainstream, I worked with a local studio on a couple shows for a CD series of original Twilight Zone-ish stories. I don't think the $20 CDs sold well, I didn't get any royalties, the studio dissolved, and I never actually got to listen to the final product.

I've done a few shows with a group that performs old radio shows here in Richmond. They're called the On The Air Radio Players. Like much community theatre, it does not pay. BUT (like other community theatre), it's definitely been good for networking. We have a few people who work on the shows in some capacity or another who also do commercials and some other voice over work in the area. If you have a radio players type dealie in your general vicinity, check 'em out. You should have a blast, get to show off some character voices, and (hopefully) be working with a few knowledgeable people.

I have a little bit more free time and spare dough than I used to, so I'm gonna start shopping for one of the wonderful mics mentioned in this thread. If I manage to make a passable demo in the near future, I will post it here.

The Joe Man
Apr 7, 2007

Flirting With Apathetic Waitresses Since 1984

Here's something: http://tinyurl.com/7v3zhhl

I'm not going to enter because I absolutely loathe their system, but it might spark someone else to go for it.

CuddleChunks
Sep 18, 2004



Sulphuric Sundae posted:

I've done a few shows with a group that performs old radio shows here in Richmond. They're called the On The Air Radio Players.

Woah! A friend of mine sent me the link to your group earlier this year. Unfortunately life stuff got in the way but I am working up some scripts to submit. Hahah, your group sounds like a ton of fun, congrats on being a part of that! I love old time radio stuff. I hope you get some fun scripts this year.

The Joe Man - thank you for that link! I just moved so I'm busy trying to find my recording gear in a sea of boxes. It looks like a fun contest.

Sulphuric Sundae
Feb 10, 2006

You can't go in there.
Your father is dead.


CuddleChunks posted:

Woah! A friend of mine sent me the link to your group earlier this year. Unfortunately life stuff got in the way but I am working up some scripts to submit. Hahah, your group sounds like a ton of fun, congrats on being a part of that! I love old time radio stuff. I hope you get some fun scripts this year.

Our script contest last year had like 5 submissions or something, and I think they were all from the Richmond area. But I was talking with the board last week, and they told me they got something close to 40 this time. Maybe it's just because the criteria isn't as narrow as it was last year, where the scripts had to be confined to a specific genre.

Next paycheck, I'll buy a mic. But, as I sit in my house in the suburbs, I realize that there's a lot of noise around. People mowing their lawns, birds chirping from the tree near my window, children playing, young fellows trying to impress ladies with their loud, souped up pickup trucks and motorcycles. Should I be using an SM58 or some other dynamic mic like that to help mitigate the outside noise?

Health Services
Feb 27, 2009


Hi. I'm helping to create a short narrative historical documentary about the early days of Canada's National Film Board for a university history class. Unfortunately, a voice actor bailed at the very last minute, and we really need to find someone that can do these lines with a scottish accent.

Due: Before Wednesday night, March 28th.

Notes: John Grierson was a scottish filmmaker. You can find a sample of his voice here, around 23:49 and 26:10. If it would be possible to have the lines read a couple different ways, that would be very much appreciated.

Script:

My hope has been that film will secure the future and serve the still wider needs of the people of Canada. John Grierson.

Those who had studied the development of propaganda were constantly warning that a highly organized Information Service, national and international, was as necessary as any other line of defence.

The National Film Board will be the eyes of Canada. It will, through a national use of cinema, see Canada and see it whole--its people and its purposes.

So there you have it. There are two sides to propaganda, and two sides to the film at war. In that way I have thought to rescue from these barren days of trouble something we can hand on to the future.

Pay: We don't really have a budget, but we would be able to offer $20 as a token of our appreciation and gratitude.

ChaosTheory
Oct 1, 2003



Pillbug

I will give this a shot, do you have Skype?

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The Joe Man
Apr 7, 2007

Flirting With Apathetic Waitresses Since 1984

Just checking in with everyone to see if anyone's done some voicework in the meanwhile and if you've been successful in finding local acting lists to sign up for and buffed up your resumes.

Also offering any free coaching advice for a bit (at least until I get busy again).

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