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Eletriarnation
Apr 6, 2005

People don't appreciate the substance of things...
objects in space.


Pillbug

Whoops, didn't realize that's what it was - my mistake. Yeah, 2x8GB DDR3-1600 is not a bad place to be even if you leave it at stock - a lot of systems from that generation would use 1333.

You may realize, but to be clear the 0.5V is a maximum so you definitely don't need to keep it that far away - e.g. if your Vtt is up to 1.4V, please don't set the RAM from the stock 1.5 up to 1.9. This warning is mostly for older DDR3 which used 1.65 - you shouldn't use this stuff with the newer generations of DDR3 processors because if your Vtt is way down around 1.0 the large voltage gap can damage the memory controller.

With boards I have worked with, RAM frequency is a product of BCLK and a separate, shown multiplier which you can also set - usually it starts at 6x or 8x and goes up in 2x (because it's DDR) steps. I don't think there's a way to set the RAM frequency in a more granular way due to the need for synchronization with BCLK. Your 1600MHz sticks would be 133x12 at stock, so if you set them down to 8x then you can go all the way up to a BCLK of 200 before you have to overclock the RAM just to keep going. Keep in mind that you may have to change latency too, depending on what your motherboard set as defaults once you set RAM timing to manual mode. It's been easiest for me to just take a picture with my phone of the SPD values in hwinfo or CPU-Z or whatever when the system is booted, and then I have a handy reference for what values are in spec while I'm looking at BIOS.

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ufarn
May 30, 2009


Eletriarnation posted:

Whoops, didn't realize that's what it was - my mistake. Yeah, 2x8GB DDR3-1600 is not a bad place to be even if you leave it at stock - a lot of systems from that generation would use 1333.

You may realize, but to be clear the 0.5V is a maximum so you definitely don't need to keep it that far away - e.g. if your Vtt is up to 1.4V, please don't set the RAM from the stock 1.5 up to 1.9. This warning is mostly for older DDR3 which used 1.65 - you shouldn't use this stuff with the newer generations of DDR3 processors because if your Vtt is way down around 1.0 the large voltage gap can damage the memory controller.

With boards I have worked with, RAM frequency is a product of BCLK and a separate, shown multiplier which you can also set - usually it starts at 6x or 8x and goes up in 2x (because it's DDR) steps. I don't think there's a way to set the RAM frequency in a more granular way due to the need for synchronization with BCLK. Your 1600MHz sticks would be 133x12 at stock, so if you set them down to 8x then you can go all the way up to a BCLK of 200 before you have to overclock the RAM just to keep going. Keep in mind that you may have to change latency too, depending on what your motherboard set as defaults once you set RAM timing to manual mode. It's been easiest for me to just take a picture with my phone of the SPD values in hwinfo or CPU-Z or whatever when the system is booted, and then I have a handy reference for what values are in spec while I'm looking at BIOS.
Yeah, managed to remember correctly, 1600.

My DRAM frequency is changed directly in BIOS (same with QPI) AFAICT:



I don't know how exactly these figures are produced, and I wonder if they change when I mess with BCLK. But looking at that, it doesn't include 1600, so I'm actually not sure what is implied with "Auto". Looks like it's specifically for downclocking the RAM, but no idea if "Auto" will stick with the same frequency or the original multiplier and mess things up when I increase BCLK.

e: Looks like another DRAM setting may open up once you enable overclock mode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QFw_BPvaa5o.

e: But the point being that the DRAM and QPI settings have an Auto option and some other frequencies that seem to be lower than the default clock (ie no 1600 option for DRAM), so I wonder what choosing "Auto" after I'm done overclocking would "revert" them back to. At least this looks like the only thing I have to figure out before proceeding.

e: Looks like I can use the advanced settings to at least double-check on my RAM speed when I have to reset things by the end. I assume the AI Tweaker is just a simplified interface for this stuff. Now I just have to make sure I'll do right by QPI.

ufarn fucked around with this message at Jun 24, 2017 around 17:35

Eletriarnation
Apr 6, 2005

People don't appreciate the substance of things...
objects in space.


Pillbug

My bet is that Auto for the RAM frequency setting is picking the highest SPD bin the motherboard supports, which I assume for your RAM is 1600MHz. Apparently they didn't feel like they needed to include a way to hard-set a bin higher than 1333MHz, at least in that UI mode.

Often they'll hide more detailed settings like the multiplier unless you change some stuff from 'Auto' to 'Manual' like maybe CPU Level Up or Ai Overclock Tuner in what I see there - whatever gives you access to BCLK. I would bet that with that change, the RAM speed setting will also change to a multiplier instead of a frequency. If the interface is poorly designed it might continue to say '1333MHz' etc. but really mean "...at base BCLK", so x10. If there is still an "Auto" option at that point it will probably just scale up that highest SPD bin's clocks until it doesn't work anymore, if I had to guess. Hopefully it'll give you a multiplier since that will be simplest.

I don't think that it's possible for the motherboard to hold the RAM at a given frequency while the BCLK moves around in any case, RAM and CPU frequency both have to be an integer multiple of that speed.

Eletriarnation fucked around with this message at Jun 24, 2017 around 20:00

MaxxBot
Oct 6, 2003

I'm the tortoise in the race, but I'm a joyful tortoise.


Deuce posted:

I upgraded from the 6600k to the 7700k, and decided to sacrifice the 6600k and practice delidding for the very first time.

Put the 6600k in an old motherboard, let it run at stock settings. Both Intel Burn Test and Prime95 would almost immediately shove the poor bastard up to ~90C. (92 highest reported) This was using an old Hyper 212 Evo with two fans on it running at 100%, open-air test bench.

I was going with the razor blade method, and this was pretty tough. Even added some blood to my sacrifice on the altar of science when I nicked myself with the razor. With all the grunting, scraping, blade slipping, and scratching sounds, I was already pretty much 100% certain the thing would be dead as disco when I pushed the start button.

My concerns were more or less confirmed when the startup gave me the message "New CPU detected! Press F1 to enter bios" or whatever. It's the same CPU, computer! Must be screwed.

Load the bios, everything at default, reset. Monitor does a weird flicker, like a boot loop. Yep. Killed it.

Suddenly I'm looking at the windows login screen. Holy gently caress is this thing working!?

15 minutes into IBT and the highest temp reported across all cores is 66. Now, this is just at stock settings, but it is an IBT load that was ~25C higher before the delid.

Jesus christ is this normal!? I can't wait to see what this thing will do on water.

I own both a 6600k and a 7700k and I think I'm gonna bite the bullet and delid, thanks for the write-up.

Deuce
Jun 18, 2004
Mile High Club

MaxxBot posted:

I own both a 6600k and a 7700k and I think I'm gonna bite the bullet and delid, thanks for the write-up.

I'd suggest a delid kit and nonconductive paste. Lots of people use liquid metal for a couple extra degrees but that seems like a terrible idea.

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