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Schiavona
Oct 8, 2008



This is an exceptional OP and I can't wait to spend time at work tomorrow poring over it and figuring out how to decrease the lifespan of the computer you guys helped me build.

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Schiavona
Oct 8, 2008



Factory Factory posted:

The best thing to do is to Google up an AnandTech or other review of the card and see what the reviewers got. Reviewers work with reference cards, and reference cards are generally representative of the average, everyday, unbinned GPU so its very likely that their results can be applied to your card with zero effort. AnandTech especially tends to stick to non-insane voltages, and its reviewers will also tell you the best clocks you can expect at stock voltage, too. Using their numbers will give you a short-cut to finding your optimal settings, or you can just take them as-is for an easy overclock.

So, pulling up a Tom's Hardware review, they OC'd a Zotac 560ti-448 from:

Core Clock: 765 MHz
Memory Clock: 950 MHz

to

Core Clock: 860 MHz
Memory Clock: 1050 MHz

on stock voltage. So is it pretty safe to just go into Afterburner, bump the values from stock to the Tom's OC and give it a try to at least set a base level OC?

Schiavona
Oct 8, 2008



Factory Factory posted:

Yep, that's the idea. Cards vary, so do stability tests and be wary of artifacts, and be ready to dial things down a little bit just in case.

Awesome, thanks. I assume I need to make a different fan profile? The card's auto is about 40%, and I don't think it adjusts too often. Do I need to bump it up to 60%+, or will the auto setting keep it where it needs to be?

Schiavona
Oct 8, 2008



So just bumping the card to a 780MHz core clock and 1005MHz memory clock, it was fine in Unigine (High shaders, Normal tessellation, Anisotropy set to 4, no AA, fullscreen at 1920x1080 - overall an average of 43fps) but in OCCT, it overheated in about 2 minutes(auto-cancelling at 85C). But when I fired up BF3 and played for a while, no problems whatsoever.

At stock speeds, again Unigine was fine, but OCCT overheated at the same rate.

Is OCCT that nuts on hardware, or what?

Schiavona
Oct 8, 2008



Is FurMark still used/useful, or is it only OCCT and Unigine?

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Schiavona
Oct 8, 2008



Agreed posted:

Graphics card overclocking is a lot more trial-and-error than CPU overclocking, basically. A solid power supply and a quality motherboard are absolute requirements for heavy GPU overclocking, because you can approach the practical limits of what a PCIe slot and one or two PCIe power connectors can put out, and if you do, you need to be absolutely certain that your power supply won't have issues serving power, and that the motherboard's own power delivery to the slot is quality.

Can you go into this a little more? I was under the impression that the mobo limited CPU OC'ing, though it makes sense that it also has an effect on the GPU. What decides quality/power delivery?

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