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PainBreak
Jun 9, 2001


kiteless posted:

Lavendar anything. Stop putting lavendar in desserts, it tastes like soap. loving gross.
Mussels. I keep trying them but I just don't really like them. Clams are awesome though.
Although I don't like raw clams on my sushi. Not a fan of that snappy rubberbandy texture. Nope.

I have to disagree with most of this...

Christopher Elbow makes some amazing chocolates filled with a lavender caramel. As far as mussels go, they're awesome...especially when served with fries. Low tide smells like...well, if I walk out my door. It smells like "the bay."

"The Bay" smells like poo poo.

I've only had clams in my linguine, in my chowdah, or in my Treasure Chest, and they're clearly awesome in all of those instances.

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PainBreak
Jun 9, 2001


This place is just depressing... The majority of the population (70%+) is Hispanic, but yet the Mexican food is terrible. The rest of the population consists of white trash racist homophobes who think that Whataburger is haute cuisine.

I'm a man of statistics, so I can't help but wonder about the suicide rate for new residents.

PainBreak
Jun 9, 2001


Plastic Jesus posted:

No it isn't. It takes less time to make the sauce than it takes to bring the water to a boil and cook the noodles.

But, it takes two pans. TWO PANS.

PainBreak
Jun 9, 2001


Just got caught up with RouxChat...

Does anyone making a mornay really cook their roux for 10+ minutes? I want the absolute lightest roux I can possibly have, while having cooked the 'floury' taste out of it. We're talking 2 minutes, tops...just when it goes from foamy to grainy. I couldn't imagine darkening it up more than that... Bleh...

PainBreak
Jun 9, 2001


pile of brown posted:

youre not comprehending RouxChat... the ten minutes is TOTAL cooking time after adding the flour. So if you cook your roux for two minutes you need to be sure to cook your roux-thickened sauce for at least eight more minutes to make sure it doesn't taste like flour. In home applications youre probably going to have the sauce on the stove for far longer that that and it would never come up

Yeah, it's not that I didn't comprehend so much that it doesn't make sense. The temperature at which you maintain a bechamel, which then becomes a mornay, isn't high enough to "cook" the flour taste out, in my opinion. I saw someone mention "simmering" their sauce. Personally, I'd never take mine to a simmer, but that's because I don't like broken sauces.

Anyway, maybe the real point that was being made is that induction burners boil water in 4 minutes, and that's not enough time to put together a proper mornay.

PainBreak
Jun 9, 2001


Had dinner at Uchiko yesterday... Bad cellphone pics, but pics nonetheless.

Brussels Sprouts (Crispy Brussels Sprouts, Lemon Chili)


Koviche (Diver Scallops, Tomatillo, Kalamata Olive Powder, Black Lime)


Boquerones (Spanish White Anchovy, Bottarga, Gremolata)


Bacon Sen (Grilled Kurobuta Pork Belly, Green Onion, Fish Caramel)


Uni (Sea Urchin, Basil, Sea Salt)


Shime Saba (Cured Norwegian Mackerel, Tomato, Truffle, Basil)


Gyutan (Grilled Beef Tongue, Yuzu Kosho)


Buttermilk Mousse, Cilantro Sorbet, Avocado Cream, Pepper Jelly


The food was amazing. The service was okay, but approaching awkward at times, but I think it was more an individual issue than an issue with the restaurant. I wouldn't hesitate to go back.

PainBreak
Jun 9, 2001


I was looking at an old Life magazine today and found this tasty recipe...

PainBreak
Jun 9, 2001


Happy Abobo posted:

I wonder how much they worried that throwing that 1/4tsp of oregano into the recipe would be too exotic for the home cook.

I wonder who went, "Golly, I know what this canned bean casserole is missing...oregano! Mmm mmm, now that tastes just swell!"

It caught my eye after hearing that my sister-in-law made "Mexican Lasagna" and brought it to my father's house. Look, I wasn't there, but I've been a party to her "cooking" before. By lasagna I'm pretty sure she means "casserole", and by Mexican I have my suspicions she means "cream of mushroom soup."

PainBreak
Jun 9, 2001


I'm curious as to what you consider white trash cooking, bartolimu.

To me, that means meatloaf with ketchup, hamburger helper, and spaghetti noodles with packets of brown gravy. All served with a side of boxed macaroni and cheese.

I guess I equate it with low effort, low budget meals.

PainBreak
Jun 9, 2001


I'm getting ready to wet cure some turkeys for smoking, and decided to see if Ruhlman had anything to say on the subject...

Brine, an extraordinary tool

Cool, a 5% brine sounds about right... Let's see what people are saying in the comments section!

luis posted:

March 23, 2008 at 12:23 pm
Well reading some more on Salt testing of foods seems to suggest that measuring the impedance of the meat (typical resistance measurement)might be usefull in determining the salt content of the meats.
Haven’t found anyone making such a meter but would not surprise me if they were already out.
I did find salinity meters that are used in fish farming and other techniques. If brining for flavor really takes off….$$$$$$$$cha ching!

...and it goes on, and on.

PainBreak
Jun 9, 2001


I've eaten at a lot of very nice restaurants, and experienced some amazing meals. Tonight, however, my mind was blown at Story in Prairie Village, KS. It was the perfect storm of rich, punchy flavor combinations, coupled with excellent and unpretentious service. It was one of those meals where, as a pretty competent home cook, I take bite after bite and wonder, "how did they make this so delicious?"

I took some bad cell phone pics...


Manhattan Story (Made with Basil Hayden's, Sweet Vermouth and Rhubarb Bitters) and Aviatrix (Made with Hayman's Old Tom Gin, Lavender, Maraschino)


Lobster Linguine with Chanterelles, Swiss Chard and Burrata


Seafood Risotto with Spinach, Shrimp and Grouper


Seared Foie Gras with a Porcini Mushroom Crepe, House Made Sausage and Pickled Fennel


Bread Pudding with Blackberries, Vanilla Ice Cream, White Chocolate and Balsamic Vinegar

Oh, and it was happy hour, so my wife and I walked out completely stuffed, for $64 before tip. It's difficult to explain how ridiculous that is, so I had to share.

PainBreak
Jun 9, 2001


I'm sure I've said it before, but god loving drat, I hate reading reviews of recipes online. I often make the Artichoke and Mushroom Lasagna from Epicurous. It's pretty much perfect exactly as the recipe states. Maybe needs a little more bechamel to bring it all together, but overall, it's spot on. It's 1lb artichoke hearts, 1lb mushrooms, cooked up in some dry vermouth, layered, with bechamel. Nothing to it, and tastes exactly like you'd expect those flavors to taste.

Of course, nobody can be bothered to actually go shopping for ingredients when they make a recipe, though.

" I made this recently, along with a traditional red sauce lasagna, for a dinner party for 10 and it was a big hit. I followed the recipe exactly except that, for the artichoke hearts, I substituted a jar of Pastene artichoke pesto and it added a lovely rich flavor, plus I didn't have to chop the artichokes."

"Because of my husband's preferences, I used 16 oz broccoli instead of artichokes and left out the vermouth. I also added a layer made from 1 pd ricotta, 4 handfulls of fresh spinach (steamed and drained), and 1 egg, which I put on top of the pasta layer. I think I only got 3 layers of pasta in there total, because I didn't have enough veggies for more layers."

"Taste not worth the calories. Instead, I would recommend using a lemon Alfredo. Less calories and a much more flavorful dish. Also, it's great paired with a '97 Sterling Reserve Cabernet or an 86' french champagne."

"I made as directed except that I used wine instead of Pernod. I really just thought the lasagna lacked a key flavor component and was above all, heavy. I know that lasagna tends to be heavy anyway but this one didn't have enough contrast to balance it. It wasn't terrible, just not worthy of making again in my book."

God drat, I wish they'd have used AN ENTIRE CUP OF PERNOD.

I give this Artichoke and Mushroom Lasagna recipe 2 stars, not good and won't make again. I didn't have Artichokes, so I substituted canned sardines, and we don't eat mushrooms in our household, so I used Tic Tacs and raisins. Instead of making the labor-intensive bechamel, I subbed 1/2 Mt. Dew and 1/2 Sam's Choice Cola. It was terrible, and you should take it off of your site.

I didn't have enough vegetables, so I substituted four McDoubles from the McDonalds Dollar Menu, and for the bechamel, I used a Wendy's Frostee. They only had chocolate, which wouldn't have been my preference, but after topping the last layer with chili, nobody even noticed.

In other news, bacon's baconing and Canadian bacon's baconing eh, in the fridge.

PainBreak
Jun 9, 2001


A couple of nights ago, I had one of those "so detailed, it's almost reality" dreams.

I was running my own butcher shop, and making custom charcuterie for customers. People would bring in their deer, elk, duck, pheasant, etc, and I would come up with a way to cure/smoke/sausage/whatever.

Everything was going great, until I received a human leg that someone wanted made into a ham. Reluctantly, I created a beautiful, spiral sliced, hickory smoked human ham from the leg for my customer.

Then, they kept showing up. Two, three, six human hams hanging in the meat locker. What the gently caress?

That's when I woke up. I rolled over, checked the time, and checked Facebook. The first post was from a restaurant I like to eat at, and their special was misspelled.

"Wine Braised Short Rob with Creamy Polenta."

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PainBreak
Jun 9, 2001


therattle posted:

I love it! That is hilarious in a gruesome way



NOOOOOOOO!

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