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GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



dino. posted:

IPA beer. gently caress that noise, it's way too bitter.

And you call yourself Indian.

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GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Lavender in desserts is awesome. You are all as broken as the former spicehate thread people

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



kiteless posted:

Do you like patchouli in your desserts, too? Because that's on the same level as appetizing, to me.

I've never had it, but I'm sure in the right hands and in the right prep it could work.

Edit: Maybe a cardamom and hemp custard, coffee caramel, and patchouli air.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



mindphlux posted:

has anyone ever tried to make the steam bun things that are popping up in restaurants here and there? I think momofuku was one of the first classy joints I heard of that had them - inevitably they are 2 bite size and filled with a slice of pork belly

Yeah, I made them for my ICSA: effort entry. They're not hard, but they're hella cheap and easy to get at chinese bakeries, so I never make them.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Yawgmoth posted:

This is the chili with/out beans argument but for vegans, isn't it.

yeah, vegans can't even agree with each other what they are. It's sad because everyone else in the world knows exactly what they are

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



pnumoman posted:

I'm with dino on this one; why would anyone even try to argue that honey is vegan? It's nectar processed by bees, and unless you want to claim that insects are somehow not animals, I don't understand how you can call yourself vegan and eat honey.

I don't think you can call yourself a vegan and eat anything. Any thing that has grown in the ground has either had insects killed in order for it to make it to market or has had animal by products such as manure and worm castings added to it to help it grow. If one was to be a true idealistic vegan all of these things are off limits.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



dino. posted:

I saw cheese in the store for like $2 for a pound! I don't think you'd need /that/ much cheese, right? Right? Bueller? Bueller? I'm guessing that it's the convenience of having it all right there.

There's something to be said about the texture of kraft mac. So much so that Modernist Cuisine tries to get the same effect but with better quality cheese and things like sodium citrate and iota carageenan. Making mac and cheese in the traditional manner: making a bechamel, turning into a mornay, cooking real noodles, are all very time consuming compared to parboiled noodles and instant sauce.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



PainBreak posted:

But, it takes two pans. TWO PANS.



difficulty scales with panuse

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



what? Never rinse a pasta.

Halalelujah posted:

Also big thanks to gravity for the chinese cleaver I got for secret santa. It owns owns owns, I like it better than my chef knife, I made the whole meal using only that cleaver!

Awesome, I'm glad you like it!

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



They'll carry Le Creuset at Marshalls/Ross every now and then, they're usually going for about 70-90 depending on size.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Why not just stainless steel pot for acidic sauces? I still don't get the enamelware appeal.

I only have an enameled terrine, I should use it more. I vote terrine for the next COOK OR DIE.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Halalelujah posted:

What is everyone making for Fat Tuesday? I was thinking shrimp etoufee.

I am going to do a tasting for the caterer for my weeding.

Mr. Wiggles posted:

I've never seen a stainless pot with the thermal heft of a cast iron dutch oven.

What's the point of thermal capacitance for acidic sauces in a dutch oven? Pretty much anything you could do in an enameled dutch oven you can do in a stainless steel stock pot, and the things you can't, you can do in a non enameled cast iron dutch oven.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



SubG posted:

Chili is the obvious one. It's a stew and so you'd prefer a dutch oven over a stock pot for it for the same reasons you would for any stew.

and what reasons would that be? Only ones I've heard were and not

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



SubG posted:

A cast iron dutch oven buffers heat better than an aluminium stock pot does, and is therefore better at maintaining an low, even temperature over a long period of time. The mechanics are something like the argument for a puddle machine over a conventional oven---the cast iron is good at conducting heat to the food being cooked, and its large thermal mass makes it inherently stable. In both cases this doesn't work unless you've got reasonably good control over the work cycle of your heat source (the electric heater in a puddle machine or the electric coil/gas element in a conventional oven or range), but no matter how well your heat source is instrumented, you're going to make it work less the more efficient you make the rest of the cooking system. This is the same reason a good crockpot will use a earthenware or cast iron pot, and for that matter why stews and braises work the way they do (that is, why you have a bunch of cooking liquid in those things you want to cook low and slow), and why so many other kinds of traditional slow cooking do things like burying the food (basically turning the ground into a giant earthenware radiator and heat reservoir). Same thing for the design of brick ovens, and things like autoclaves and kilns and modern forges and so on.

I can get into the fiddly thermodynamic horseshit involving heat capacity and conductivity if you really want, but I'm not sure how useful that would be here for building an intuitive feel for what's happening.

I'm gonna call shenanigans. A good quality clad pan (with a copper or aluminum core) will conduct heat across the entire cooking surface, cast iron is more likely to develop hot spots since its conductivity is less than half that of aluminum and almost 1/4 that of copper. Unless you're riding your burner knob, the heat output is going to be consistent. All this is pointless anyway for a classical braise so I stand by my original statement: anything you can do in an enamelware dutch you can do just as well in a stainless steel or in a non enamel cast iron. If you need super spergy braise temps, you're gonna puddle.

You can go into thermodynamic "horseshit" if you want. I'm ABD on a Physics PhD so...

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



i shoot friendlies posted:

I think mass matters, though...

for what? Heat capacitance? Is it on the heat or not? Are you cooking outdoors in the Arctic? I mean, if you wanna drop a load on something that is only more useful for bragging rights than actual cooking, go right ahead.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



editing for emphasis because people are turning this from enamelware to all of castiron debate.

i shoot friendlies posted:

Well, an aluminum skillet weight, maybe a pound. A cast iron skillet weighs, maybe ten pounds. It takes a lot more energy to change the temp on ten pounds than on one pound, in either direction. Maybe you can write your dissertation on that...

I don't think you're understanding what I'm saying so I'll say it again but differently. Are you cooking on coals or something that is so variable over the course of the cooking time that you need that much heat capacitance? Are you cooking in a place whose ambient temperature can make the sides of a pot decrease in temperature so significantly (this is arguably more of a problem for cast iron than stainless clad copper, see conduction). What you don't seem to get is that that extra weight is actually just useless for a majority of tasks. Now you're kind of getting off topic, this was an enamelware dutch oven discussion not a skillet discussion, not a cast iron vs stainless discussion, a very specific enamelware dutch oven discussion. Maybe you should just go back to sous viding whole rib roasts and poisoning your family.

Edit again: I will return to my original request, what is something that you can do in an enamelware dutch oven that you can't do in a stainless pot or a standard non enamel cast iron dutch oven?

GrAviTy84 fucked around with this message at Feb 22, 2012 around 03:01

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



mindphlux posted:

dude what are you talking about? I know I'm interjecting myself into this debate and you aren't even really arguing with me, AND I don't even own any cast iron at the moment (need to fix) BUT

are you serious? 'heat capacitance' or whatever is incredibly useful! have you ever tried to crisp poultry skin in a pan whose temperature fluctuates wildly? (flaccid skin, sticks to bottom of the pan) what about deep fry in a thin stainless pot? (temperature of oil on bottom is way hotter than rest of pot, crumbs burn to poo poo ruining the entire thing of oil), or make a risotto or really rice of any sort where you need slow steady heat?


this can all be done in a normal cast iron skillet or dutch oven, it does not require an enameled surface.

As an aside, do people really have that big of a problem with stainless and aluminum pans? I've never had a problem with them, and I know they use them day in day out in restaurants around the world. Again, I'm not saying that cast iron is useless, I am saying enamelware is.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



SubG posted:



So, in summary: the abilities of aluminium and cast iron cookware to transfer heat to food are roughly identical, but cast iron has a significantly greater ability to function as a thermal reservoir.

If you're arguing that if you can keep dumping heat into the cooking vessel (and otherwise control the environment around it) that they'll probably perform effectively identically, you're probably right. If this is not the case---if you're cooking using a conventional oven (I usually throw my dutch oven in my conventional oven, just because it heats up the kitchen less) then this will be useful in evening out temperature variations due to the oven's duty cycling. Wiggles talking about using a wood-fired stove is more or less the same thing---throwing wood on a stove and then having it burn down is another kind of duty cycle. You notice the same sort of thing in using a smoker or grill. Or a campfire. All places where you might expect to see a dutch oven.

I have spoken.

So I read the first part hoping you were arguing against what I was saying and went downstairs to get Boas because iirc there's a thing on steady state temperature distributions as a PDE problem, but luckily I finished reading your post first. Yes, p much that's what I was saying. If you read my posts it was all re:enamelware. Like I said repeatedly, I was not arguing against using a cast iron dutch oven for cast iron dutch oven things (cobblering in a firepit, cornbreadding, ovening stews, etc) this was all whether or not an enamel castiron was necessary at all. AFAIK the only reason to use an enamelware pot is for acidy braises. All other applications can use a regular cast iron. If acidy braise, you can just use a stainless or aluminum or clad whatever. If you need to oven and are worried about thermal capacitance, you can bain marie. I just wanted a specific application for which you could not use either a standard cast iron dutch oven or a stainless clad pot.

This is all a dead horse now, so I say we just drop it because it seems like anytime you say "cast iron" in this subforum people react like you're attacking their firstborn, they just ignore anything you say and just jump straight to "OH NO YOU DIDN'T"

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



I like Asian desserts

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



mediaphage posted:

Does your fiancée know about Ms. Desserts?

well played

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Mr. Wiggles posted:

I have never had a lobster roll. I don't even really know what a lobster roll is. Is it like a taco?

Picture a tuna salad sandwich. Ok now replace the tuna with chunks of lobster and replace the bread with a soft but toasted heavily buttered roll. That's a lobster roll. Some lobster rolls have a warm lobster filling comprised of lobster in a shitton of butter.

They really should call them butter rolls with lobster.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Mr. Wiggles posted:

That sounds......unimpressive.

they're tasty but not really anything that special. If you're ever in LA, Son of a Gun has really good lobster rolls.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



+1 for Dungeness Crab superiority. King crab is all about yield and not as much about flavor, dungeness delivers on both fronts.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



I don't know. I will reuse ziplocs that held dry things like pasta or beans or that held frozen things that I just restocked with the same of whatever. Paper towels I usually toss into the compost pile.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



It's like Fox News on a deserted island. You can probably figure out what's going on in the rest of the world once you figure out how to ignore all the awfulness and after all you have no other options.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Darval posted:

I've heard a lot about Sriracha sauce, but never actually tried it before today. Holy poo poo. It burns. Burns so good

what? huh? How is there someone who has never had Sriracha?

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Steve Yun posted:

Trader Joe's chicken sausages are kinda bleh.

fixed it for you

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



My cheap beer of choice is Full Sail Session Black or a growler fill from local brewery: Hangar 24.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



bunnielab posted:

Also Full Sail Session Black is not cheap beer. It is cheap for decent beer but anything over $1 a bottle anit cheap. I have most of a 12 pack kicking around here, I like it but I think I like Shriner Black better.

It's the least I spend per bottle by far and compared to the rest of my beer cache, it's cheap.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



I've not used it, but I know you can get manageable beginner sizes from Modernist Pantry. I've ordered other things from them and they seem pretty good.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



dino. posted:

I'm not going to google Blumpkin. Ever.

Out here, even Modelo is like $9 for a 6 pack of the cans. And a 6 pack of bottles of Presidente is like $9 standard anywhere you go. I haven't bothered looking at the other beers, because I don't see the point in spending over $1/bottle for Budweiser. I have not seen any beer less than $9 for a 6-pack. Ever.

In Illinois, however, it's not so bad at all.

I remember keystone light being the beer of choice when I was in a fraternity in college. You could get a 30 pack for $11.99 from Rite Aid.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



bartolimu posted:

Well, this is certainly something.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sO-msplukrw

Holy lol. I laughed too hard at this.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



I like turtles posted:

I am so loving excited right now because this place apparently just opened a little ways away from where I work. It is supposed to be fantastic. http://chinapastahouse.com/China_Pasta_House/menu.html

There is a decent chance I will bring home like $80 worth of buns, dumplings and noodles and not be able to eat it all in one sitting and slip into a good-Chinese-food induced coma surrounded by cooling steamed buns.

holy cheapness. that's awesome, hope that it's actually good. I could live off of preserved egg and pork gruel for an embarrassingly long time.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



I like turtles posted:

Pork steamed buns (Pork har gao. Tasty, the sauce was really good too. Don't know my chinese sauce flavors well enough to even begin deconstructing it.)

har gao is not a bun. I think you mean char siu bao.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



you left out play doh

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



Sjurygg posted:

Cut an inch into my hand. Nothing much.

Dropped a knife and instinctively tried to catch it. It shaved two tendons on my right pinky right off the bone. Had to have surgery and I still have very limited range of motion on that pinky.

Good news is, I caught it. Bad news is, I caught it, then it hurt, so I dropped it....


...on my toe. Needed 3 stitches on that too.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



logical fallacy posted:

Before I could finish the thought, "I'm glad I missed that vein," the wound started bleeding like crazy.

Yeah, I can understand that sentiment... With mine I remember looking at it and thinking "oh that's not too ba....why can't I wiggle my finger?" That feeling of knowing you used to be able to do something mere seconds before is one that I would not wish on anyone.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



I've eaten a dino food at the dino haus. Good stuff. He will try to fill you up on various veggies but then bring out the deep fried stuff later. Protip, hold out for the deep fried stuff.

not that the veggies and stuff were bad, they were very good.

GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



dino. posted:

You're going to /be/ the party, Charmmi. Since I don't have PMs, maybe you can set it up with VM for when you're in town with Mr. Charmmi. :3

Aren't you two friends on g+ anyway, I remember hangingout with both of you at once in the past.

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GrAviTy84
Nov 24, 2004



KozmoNaut posted:

I think my cutlery collection is missing something, the whole thing fits on a single badly-photographed magnet


Victorinox, Burgvogel, Fiskars, Fiskars, Raadvad, Raadvad, Zwilling J.A. Henckels, Raadvad, Zone, Fiskars

Which completely unnecessary sharp-edged item do I need to complete the set?

Also, show off your compensating-iest knives (12 inches, woo!).

EDIT: vvv Which one would you call a carver? Fourth from the left is a bread knife. But a slicer is a good suggestion, it could do double duty as a salmon knife

All those knives and not a good one in the set.

Sell em all and buy a 270mm Aogami Super Moritaka, a CCK cleaver, and a dojo paring knife, and maybe a Kanemasa petty in the 150 mm range.

If you feel like you need more knives still, well you don't, but you can probably get a yanagiba of some sort and a tojiro honesuki

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