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DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

And another benefit is that you will reduce your drag when moving through the water, meaning you exert less energy. Over a long dive trip, that can make a difference.

As for bungee cords and clips, they are a great resource. I would lose my mask if it wasn't attached to my head.

Ask me how I know

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DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

MrTheDevious posted:

This is something you guys might not know the answer to, but I have REALLY strange sinus problems. I've always wanted to dive, but I can't really go below 10 feet in a pool without feeling like my head's going to explode from the pressure I'm mostly unable to equalize. Is there a solution for this? I really want to dive but not at the cost of my ears blowing up
Do you have sinus problems besides the ones with equalizing? It might be that you're trying to equalize too great of a pressure difference, which is what's thwarting your attempts. If you can do the Discover Scuba class you can try equalizing ridiculously frequently and see if that helps.

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

I don't think you're actually burning it, it sounds like you're just building up a lot of soot

I haven't tried it yet but it sounds like a good idea. If I'm right about the soot part I'll probably smear a thin layer of dish soap on the lens and get that all sooty before rubbing it around and rinsing it off.

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

Yeah if your mask has a glass lens it's definitely soot, though that's a good point about abrasion. I wasn't as sure about plastic lenses though, since I hadn't tried the process before.

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

Can someone explain surface-supplied air for me? Someone I trust with a ton of diving experience told me they used a surface unit and therefore didn't need to worry about decompression limits. I may be way off, but my understanding of the mechanics involved tells me it shouldn't make a difference: you're still breathing air at the same ambient pressure, your body should absorb it the same.

Is there something I'm missing? I didn't get the impression he was talking about using a heliox or nitrox gas mix or anything like that, just a surface compressor.

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

Thanks, that's what I thought. I figured the reason they had essentially no limit was because their depth was under 1 ATM, not because of the source of the air. The guy was adamant about it, though, and it felt weird to contradict someone with literally thousands of dives.

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

Pufflekins posted:

Nah, it's not anything related to the department, thats just where I am getting my (limited)SCBA knowledge from. I'm hesitant about the mouth regulators because I gag when I get fluoride trays at the dentist.
For what it's worth, I gag on those trays every time and I haven't had a problem with regulators or snorkels. If you're really worried about it, buy a cheap snorkel and find a pool somewhere.

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

Chamfer is the correct word. Depending on how large they are they are also sometimes called countersinks (or countersunk holes) but that's usually just in the context of screws set flush to the surface.

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

The Sphere is pretty light on the subject. It's a structure at ambient pressure, and there's a few descriptions of jumping in and out of a moon pool that might explain how that works, but he doesn't mention gas mixes and handwaves away most diving apparatus. Decompression is only mentioned in the denoument as a mundane fact of surfacing.

Still a great book, but it didn't talk about diving all that much.

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

Under 30 feet is less than 1 atmosphere of pressure and you can generally dive indefinitely at that depth. For reference, I heard a rule of thumb that you can stay at 60 feet for 60 minutes, though obviously you shouldn't be trusting your life to that. An emergency ascent from 30 feet will generally be relatively safe if they're properly trained and don't panic, i.e. exhale the whole way up and watch for obstacles. It's so shallow though that unless they lose all air or accidentally drop weight they could probably make a leisurely ascent; otherwise, it's so shallow that it would be over pretty quick.

I haven't done any recovery stuff, but you can lift a surprising amount of weight using lift bags and spare air; the concern would be the bags floating away or else someone snatching them when they surface. 30 lbs would be a bit much if they're trying to carry it themselves to the surface and compensate with their buoyancy, but it might be possible if they carry extra weight down and leave it, using the gold as ballast on the way up.

EDIT: Thanks for the clarification, Crunkjuice. I've obviously never done any recovery stuff, I just look at pretty fish

DarkHorse fucked around with this message at 18:21 on Mar 18, 2013

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

In the same vein, I could use recommendations for Punta Cana if anyone has been there.

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

tl;dr: I dropped my brand new mask on my first dive after certification. Just *bloop* let it slip out of my grip while I was floating, didn't even realize until I tried to put my mask on.

The story: I first got into diving because my dad had been certified ages ago, and I thought it was a cool thing we could do together (and cool in general, of course). So my first dive after I was certified was with him off his ski boat in a local lake.

He was really out of practice, was using a lot of his old gear, and really really should have had a refresher course instead of just reading my manual, but he's old and stubborn and stupid like that sometimes. I was still a teenager and didn't feel comfortable calling him out on it, so after I got geared up he was still fiddling around on the boat dealing with his antique equipment. It got really hot so I jumped in the water and inflated my BCD, and out of fear of my mask falling off the back of my head I held onto the strap instead.

Ten minutes relaxing in the water later, my dad gives up and says his 30-year-old horseshoe BCD is leaking () and I realize my hands are empty.

EDIT: I should clarify this was a decade ago and I learned my lesson, I just wanted to join in on the embarrassing dive stories.

DarkHorse fucked around with this message at 00:46 on Jun 18, 2013

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

BotchedLobotomy posted:

I'm doing my first dive post-open water certification on my own (no buddies going with so I'll have to make a friend on the boat) in Catalina on Sunday.

I picked up some DAN insurance because I get paranoid about poo poo like that, I'm getting rental gear from the shop, same place I got certified at.
Got my gloves my boots my mask and snorkel. Got my card (cert and DAN card), my logbook. Anything I'm missing that the instructors usually handled that I'm forgetting?

Cru Jones posted:

Talk with your buddy beforehand, make sure they know your comfort level and that your plans for the dive align.

Make sure to work out hand signals ahead of time, too. They're usually consistent, but it's best to double-check if you haven't dived with them before.

DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

It's possible that water is being forced into your sinuses somehow, possible from mask flooding, and then leaking out later. Alternatively, the dry air from the tank may be drying out your sinuses, and they're overproducing mucus to compensate.

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DarkHorse
Dec 13, 2006

Vroom Vroom, BEEP BEEP!

Nap Ghost

Kaddish posted:

Anyone have first hand experience diving in the Dominican Republic? We went to Cozumel last year and we want to try a new place. Obviously we're not expecting Cozumel levels of enjoyment but I hope there is more than sand and the occasional wreck.

We're probably going to stay in Punta Cana.
I was in Punta Cana this year and took the lazy route of booking a trip through on-resort scuba shop since diving wasn't the focus of the trip.

They said there's not very great diving on that side of the island. Instead we took an hour-long bus ride across the island to the Caribbean side, then a half-hour or so boat ride to a wall reef. It went down at least 60 feet before leveling off, and probably went deeper, though we had lots of newbies in the group and they didn't want to push it. There was another feature a half-hour boat ride away called the pool that had shallower diving with fewer reef features, but a decent concentration of fish.

All in all it was definitely some decent diving. Nothing mindblowing by Caribbean standards, but that's still a great trip. The only downside is all the transit time, meaning you can only fit a few dives in a day before you have to pack up and get back.

I took some pictures with my parents' underwater camera, I'll see if I can get a hold of them.

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