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Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

old thread here,

1. Basic overview of Virtualization
2. Research and learning material
3. Terminology and Liscensing
4. Different Virtualization Companies, differences ect
5. Common Virtualization Techniques (Best practices, network set ups, Allocation of resources)
6. Misc

This will be primarily VMware/HyperV, I haven't worked with citrix enough to give a good rundown on everything citrix. If you feel confident and want it that badly please post about it


1. Basic overview of Virtualization
Keeping it pretty basic it will get more in depth later on, if you want check out the old threads OP at the top of the page.

Q: What is virtualization
A: Virtualization is the process of divvying up physical host resources for multiple operating systems to run on at once.

Q: How does that work
A: By use of a HyperVisor which we have two kinds.
Bare metal, Meaning you install the hypervisor directly onto the physical host and let it schedule resources and use it pass it up to the virtual machine. Common ones are Citrix and Vmware and Hyper-V SPECIAL THANKS TO Syano!!!
Host based, You install this hypervisor just like a program in windows/linux it manages VM's by going through the OS and software layers

Q: Which is better?
A: It depends really Vmware is best for performance and features, but has some tighter hardware requirements than something like Hyper-V. Using Bare metal you will get better performance and have access to more resources, EXSi is completely free too. So if your hardware checks out I would recommend ESXi as you can run hyper-V on top of ESXi.

Q: Who makes virtualization
A: The big players are Vmware, Citrix and Hyper-V

Q: Who uses it?
A: Amazon, apple, MS, Redhat, all the big named companies are on virtualization now.

Q: Other than the host what are good things to know for Vmware
A: Networking and storage

Q: Why would I choose to virtualize my company
A: Lots of reasons,
>No hardware dependencies
Let's say a host goes down in the middle of the night, with VMware it can restart the Server on a new host without ruining your SLA's or you even knowing until you come in
>Cost savings
You don't have to go 1:1 physical box to server, it is possible to have a hundreds of servers + data center + high uptime environment in a very small area that is easy to cool and doesn't cost as much to build
>Automation
VMware has a nice reporting feature that helps you monitor performance across your servers, so instead of having hundreds of reports print out from windows/linux/BSD you now can set rules so if a host is using 95% CPU it emails you which VM, where it is at and what the problem is, now you just give it more resources or look into what service is causing greif
>Snapshots
gently caress up an update that is causing your servers to be unresponsive? Snapshots can roll back to a running server prior to updating so you are back up and running.
>Over provisioning
I can assign a VM 1TB drive if I only have 500GB and it will be fine, ofcourse when it starts filling up you will need to watch it and vmotion it to something with more resources
---I'll add more when I see the need to---

2. Research and learning material
This will cover learning more about VMware and Hyper-V! Certs, learning VMware for the first time, or just to learn more look here!!!:fsiren:

New to Vmware/hyper-v, Want to go for the VCP, or just need to get more into it?
ORDER THE Vsphere 5 BOOK FROM SCOTT LOWE Seriously I can not even being to say how good this book is for learning, even if you are a noob or feel pretty confident with it this book will still teach you alot
Masting hyper-v Like the mastering server 2008 book but only about hyper-v

Want to learn how to script things, automate things, or do everything from vCLI?
Power CLI book is for you

I need to learn how to HA/DRS/Storage DRS work in detail!
vSpher 5 Clustering book is for you! this is just like the yellow book for 4.1

My company is going virtual, next year and they want me to plan it all![/b]
vSphere Design is the book you might want

I need to know storage AND networking?
EMC book and Cisco book will give you good working knowledge of the two areas

I want to learn this stuff hands on! How do I achieve this?
Your best way is to either get some cheap servers off ebay Save My Server generally has good deals Or better yet max your PC out with 32/GB ram and a 6/8core CPU and SSD to hos a whole cluster

That cost me around 500-550 for 32GB ram, mobo, x6, 256GB SSD, and is alot more quite than running 5 servers, I run quite a few machines at once no slowdown as the VM's are on an SSD. Sorry had to extend my
I am using Vmware workstation as I got it free from my school, it cost ~200, 100 if you are a student dollars but things like Virtual box or Vmware player or the trial of workstation 8 for 30 days Workstation 8. like I am doing you can run ESXi inside a VM, and run VM's on that hypervisor(32bit only in 7, 8 supports 64 inside 64), 3 hosts(can add more), Vcenter Enterprise plus, hosting about 10-15 VM's with ease.

I need Hyper-V!!
If you don't feel like reformatting you will need to look into one of the host based hypervisors posted above, like virtual box and install windows server 2008 R2 and go from there, not sure if virtualbox supports nesting so you may have to use 2008 and 32bit OS's in hyper v. You can download server 2008r2 here

Wait if I want to get VCP certified I have to go to a class?
Yes, to keep the cert value high and at least give people who did brain dumps some understanding of it you need to attend a VMware 5 day course or much cheaper option of looking into a local CC for it. You can tell if the school is qualified by asking them or looking on this list here or here Not all schools are fully qualified to teach to take the VCP and VCAP mine is qualified for both so make sure you check. Generally it is cheaper to go to a CC for it, most schools give you a voucher cutting the exam down to 75bucks and online academic resourses

IT SAYS MY HARDWARE ISN'T SUPPORTED!!!
Check to make sure intel-VT/amd-V are enabled in the bios and make sure they are on the HCL . NOTE that just because it isn't on the HCL doesn't mean it won't work, you can get 5 working stable on non HCL stuff but VMware/HP/Dell will not offer assistance performance isntability

3. Terminology/Licensing
There is alot of terminology that VMware gave itself, I'll try to give you the best overview on the most common terms

ESXi - The name of the hypervisor by VMware, also refereed to as ESX which while it is its own product the last build was ESX 4.1 there is no 5 planned
Vsphere Client - The program used to manage ESXi hosts remotely
vCenter - Links multiple hosts together in one easy to see manipulable resource

MOST OF THESE BELOW REQUIRE VCENTER
HA - High Availability allows virtual machines that go down to be automatically restarted without user interaction
DRS - Distributed Resource Management, This allows Vm's to be started up or moved onto different hosts allowing for load balancing across the cluster
DPM - Distributed Power Management, When hosts go to low load states DPM will shut down hosts/machines and migrate them to other hosts saving power (iLo must be supported on the host for this)
vMotion - Allows for live migration from one host to another host without downtime to the VM running
Storage vMotion - Allows the virtual disk and configuration files to move from one Datastore to another
FT - Fault tolerance, allows for a VM to run on 2 different hosts at the same time, if one host goes down the other one takes over, little to no downtime. This is different than HA as HA does a restart FT keeps the machine running
vSwitch - a internal switchin the esxi kernal allowing for virtual network traffic to pass from the vm to other VM's or to a NIC
SMP - Term for how many cpu's the VM can access
VDswitch - Virtual distributed switch, allows for layer 2 support on virtual networking and consolidation of networking across the cluster
Host Profiles - Think of these as unattend files in windows, basically you can have everything a new host needs, set network adapter IP's, storage, NTP settings, HA/DRS, you name it, in about 5 clicks
HBA - Host Bus Adapter, kinda self explanatory
Resource pool - a way to further divvy up resources among a ESXi host/cluster, generally used where resources are low and contention is obvious
Ballooning - A technique used to reclaim unuesed guest memory to keep the host from swapping pages to disk
___Storage/Netowrking___ reworked
NFS - Network File Share, VM's will be stored on these shares and accessed over the network. This method is easy to maintain, it really is as simple as making \\server\share and then adding it to the data stores. After that you are done! NFS is file level not block level meaning when it needs to access the file it puts a small lock on it momentarily this can hurt performance but on most setups you won't notice it much other than latency is a smig higher. More about file locking http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File_locking

ISCSI - Block Level, data stores are mounted and accessed via targets and initiators a bit more difficult to set up, but offers things like CHAP, no file locking, MPIO, Lun masking, and smig lower latency.

FCoE - uses the Fibre Channel WWN protocols over Ethernet instead of... Fiber! much faster than Iscsi since it does not have a TCP/IP overhead, speeds range from 4-10Gb/s latency is much lower, costs a bit more.
Fibre Channel(FC) - Runs over Fibre
Thin Provisioned - Disks are only the size the OS asks for, 1TB disk with 10Gb storage will only be 10GB
Thick Provisioned - Files are Zero'd out performance is faster than thin, SQL servers will need this
Raw Device Mapping - The raw LUN is presented to the Guest VM and offers the best performance for that VM


Which should I use?

[url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VO46FyxGf3M]An EMC guy gives a good overview worth the watch [/url] It fully depends on your environment, generally NFS will perform neck and neck with iscsi in terms of throughput/IO, and gets a nice gain with jumbo frames, and is really easy to administer and trouble shoot do to the simplistics of it. Iscsi while it is a bit more difficult to set up offers CHAP which helps increase security, offers a tad lower latency, and MPIO. I generally tend to go for iscsi just for the lower latency and chap support, spending an extra 5 minutes to set it up is worth it, but not all environments need 10ms latency vs 5ms latency and Chap support.
In short both offer about the same performance when configured properly, so it really comes down to if you need the small nitty gritty things that each have over the other.


OH NO WHICH ONE DO I GET!!!
http://www.vmware.com/products/data...mpare-kits.html

I thought there was a free one
There is just the standalone hypervisor ESXi 5, but you have to manage each host individually.

WHAT? I can't use all my ram? What is that!
http://www.vmware.com/products/vsphere/pricing.html
The Stand alone hypervisor allows you to use all the hosts ram I believe, as long as it isn't clustered

Explained

Let's use the Essentials Plus kit, you have 3 hosts total, each with dual socket CPU's, each of those CPU's can address 32GB total, so if you have a VM with 32GB ram, the CPU can not run any more VM's. While this may be a turn off at first but as long as you provision things correctly you should have no trouble. Generally I have my Servers running at 60-65% idle 75-85% load. If say a Mail/web/other server uses 2.5GB ram when low load and 3.5GB during peak I would assign it only 4GB, as unused ram is wasted ram.

4. Different Virtualization Companies, differences ect
I know I will get a lot of here this is a general overview

VMWARE Vmware probably is usually regarded to as the leader of virtualization, has the best market share and most features(that works most of the time anyways). Vmware probably costs more and is a bit more picky on hardware support, but the stuff they sell is rock solid. Generally most of the modern servers are supported, I haven't seen any dells that have not been on the support list 2950 and up. I would generally pick VMware if a client of mine needs up time and stability. Vmware server is a dead host based hypervisor vmware offered up till Jan 2010

Hyper-V Microsofts take at virtualization, cluster-able and easy to use. Comes free with server 2008(ESXi is also free), feels like any other host based hypervisor, if you use windows 7 mode or vmplayer this will be vary familiar, Hyper-V 3.0 is coming out with windows 8 and promises to offer some decent features we'll just have to wait and see. This is a good cheap solution if your hardware is older and not on the HCL or first time virtualizing this is a good choice.

Citrix Bare metal, a lot like VMware only I hear lots of horror stories regarding the instability, I really don't use citrix due to bad past expirences with them, but they are much cheaper than VMware and offer features like vmware does HA/DRS/FT they just have different names and act slightly different. If anyone wants to give there .02 on this feel free, I do hear Citrix VDI solution is much better than Vmwares, but then again we have Windows Terminal Server for a reason.

Which is right for me
It depends on your environment really

First time virtualizing, no budget, or small infrastructure to virtualize??
Chances are you have a windows 2008/2008r2 server on site, hyper-v is simplistic, somewhat clusterable, and included in your server. The other option would be convert the physical host to a vm using Vmconverter, install ESXi 5 installed onto the server and import the VM's and you are done!

Too many servers need to consolidate, uptime is the game, or want to use the most of your hardware?
Citrix of Vmware would be the best, for small businesses I would recommend the Essentials Plus kit is a good place to start, anything more Enterprise or Enterprise plus

Large environment 99.99% up times, need to make sure each vm has a nice host?
Enterprise or enterprise plus, preferably plus but that all depends on your budget an needs, Storage DRS is amazing and only in +

if anyone wants to add citrix stuff here feel free

5. Common Virtualization Techniques (Best practices, network set ups, Allocation of resources)
Now that you have an overview of Virtualization let's look more into the setups, I will mostly be addressing Vmware/Citrix here, some of the things apply to hyper-v as well but not as much

In a virtual environment you want to keep out Single Points of Failure (SPoF) and make things as modular as possible, if set up correctly you can do a Virtual environment server upgrades and network upgrades without any downtime which is pretty cool.

Networking Storage
A common malpractice is keeping storage local to the host, this is a no no for most places. Keeping storage network based allows you to restart VM's on other hosts if said host with all the VMs on it fails, keeping uptime high; shared storage is key to a virtual environment. Without shared storage you will lose HA/DRS/FT and many other key features, planning for a centralized NAS/SAN is a good idea. generally your host will be fine with a small SSD, USB drive, or 2 HDD's in raid 1, you will want to keep it with something decently fast and a good of space for host swapping if it occurs, host swapping is bad, ballooning is okay if kept under control.

But I'll take a performance hit!
This is true you are limited to network throughput, but there are counters to this.

DO's
Put your storage area network on a Vlan, subnet, separate physical network than your client machines! Not only will this increase security but will also cut down on the total traffic on the network
Use jumbo frames when possible!
Teir your storage! If possible run stagnate data on a different server that would be cheaper IE archive data on a NFS share, keep commonly accessed no high performance Storage Processors
Use port aggregation! Binding ports together for better throughput is a smart idea
Invest in 10Gb/E! It is pretty cheap now, your storage will love you!
Thick Provision SQL servers and DB servers, thin provisioning will cause a sizable performance hit!
Use an appropriate RAID, a 20 Disk raid 0 array is fast but deadly
Monitor your logs, just because "it's up" doesn't mean your thin provisioned servers aren't gobbling up GB's you don't have!
Choose the appropriate storage protocol for the job, NFS and Iscsi will give different performance!

Don't
Cheap out on your NAS! This hosts all your data spend the bucks and make sure it is working
Confuse Snapshots as backups for everything! Some servers like DC's will have a hissy fit with other DC's
Skimp on Network adapters! Remember Network is the only way these things will talk to the ESXi hosts and VM's
Not use consumer grade switches
Do the opposite of Do's

Some players in storage solutions are Netapp, emc, Equallogic/Dell, HP.

for more on networking and serious discussions look HERE

Now lets dig more into networking

Making things modular and redundant are key to this environment, to tie all this together you'll need a good solid network, as a refresh

NFS - Network file share, one of the slower storage techniques but very cheap and easy to maintain, can be greatly improved by use of jumbo frames. TCP/IP based Speeds Vary on Network Speed, latency is a bit higher than others
iScsi - Block level access to data over the network, better performance than NFS by a long shot, gets a bump from jumbo frames but isn't as noticeable as NFS gains, TCP/IP based, Speeds from 10Mb/s-10Gb/s, latency is comparable to that of a normal disk if set up on a vlan, network, or subetnet made for storage. Cheap and easy to maintain, good if you have an existing ethernet network
FCoE - uses the Fibre Channel WWN protocols over Ethernet instead of... Fiber! much faster than Iscsi since it does not have a TCP/IP overhead, speeds range from 4-10Gb/s latency is much lower, costs a bit more.
Fibre Channel(FC) - FCoE but runs over Fibre

The more net interfaces you have the better, generally you'll need 6 for a HA/vMotion environment, 1 Management 1backup mgmt, 1 Vm traffic, one for vMotion, 2 for Storage, You can piggy back VM network traffic to the vm management nic, and not see any real network hit, best would be to have one NIC for VM traffic and one for failover. Gig should be standard practice, for your storage and vmotion interfaces 10GB should heavily considered.

for more about vlans, subnets and general networking click here


Resource an allocation!

Resource Pools!
Resource pools help you divvy up resources in an environment where resources are scarce, combined with reservations help make sure resources are always available for vm's running in the pool.
Provisioning!
Just because you can over provision doesn't mean you should giving a host more ram than it needs and having it idle at 25% and expand to no more than 50% is wasting resources, running machines at 50-80% ram usage at all time is fine, unused ram is wasted ram. You also should take out anything not needed, virtual floppy drives, extra CPU cores, CD drives, USB support, ect... This will reduce the amount of overhead the VM needs in order to run, it will use up ram and for CPUs the scheduler does not need to check as often for cores idle and can get to VM's needing higher accesses(not really noticable except in stressed environments).

I'll add more as wanted and address points or clarify things as needed just give me a heads up on what you want me to address.

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Oct 22, 2012 around 19:45

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Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

evil_bunnY posted:

nolicense ESXi 5 is limited to 32GB vRAM.

Heh. Have you looked at the prices of decent 10GBE switches? I mean 10GBE is a good idea anyway, but it's not exactly commodity-priced yet.

Also, I'd be wary to generalize this. All the entry level applicances do iSCSI, but NFS is less of a management pain for vSphere. One of the problems of NFS is vmware not wanting to update their supported version.

Hmm I will check on that I am sure it can use more, maybe I was using 4

Yeah but, >10 cable runs + extra switches to make up for port loss + >10 nics costs would probably be the same if not more overall than a dual/single 10Gb/E cable run and switch to a few boxes

Yeah but most server equipment has iscsi support be hardware or software, and for an ESX data store it is safe to say iscsi is generally supported.

Thanks for the constructive critisim I will go back over some things after work or on lunch


VVVV- Ah okay I guess I was using 4 then, 32 is a good number 8 is just wow really low, 32 is just right. If you need more than 32Gb per host you really need to look into essentials+ anyway

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Feb 20, 2012 around 16:03

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

markus876 posted:

I'm not sure that you should be generalizing these two options like this.

For NFS, I wouldn't necessarily say it is "cheaper" (or more expensive for that matter) than iSCSI - they both generally use similar switching and cabling architectures. In fact, iSCSI may involve additional costs with specialized HBAs, although many deployments are no longer bothering with HBAs, especially with ESXi-bootable SD/USB sticks that mean you can run without any local disks on your ESXi servers and the performance of software initiators improving.

You could say that for the most part NFS (and iSCSI) both tend to have lower hardware costs than traditional FC deployments since you don't have to purchase FC switches and HBAs.

I would definitely not say that iSCSI has "better performance than NFS by a long shot".

See this TR from (admittedly-possibly-biased) Netapp: http://media.netapp.com/documents/tr-3697.pdf Yes, it's from 2008, but as far as I know things are pretty similar today still.

See also http://media.netapp.com/documents/tr-3749.pdf that goes into describing NFS best practices, etc.

To summarize - I would say that NFS is typically not noticeably faster or slower (in most cases) than iSCSI for most workloads.

I believe that using NFS is far simpler from the VMware side (adding datastores, having the possibility to move or copy around files by just mounting the NFS share on another host (this is especially great for the shared "media" datastore that you can mount NFS read-only on your ESX hosts, and mount rw on a unix workstation and copy ISOs to it for booting VMs), not worrying about block sizes, and VMFS extents, being able to resize an NFS share and instantly see the new size/capacity in VMware).

The biggest factor in choosing if you want to use NFS or iSCSI should probably just be what kind of support your storage has for NFS. If you are running on a platform that provides good NFS support, I highly recommend exploring and trying it out.

Going off this http://www.vmware.com/files/pdf/sto...otocol_perf.pdf (they only used GIG and some of the charts all cap at 125MB/s)
Talking Vanilla iscsi vs NFS (no jumbo frames, ToE, ect) iscsi will give you a better performance, it isn't much(Thought it was better than that to be honest) but it is there, and latency is generally lower. Since both are really easy to install configure I would still say iscsi would be a better option over NFS due to lower latency, and higher throughput. Of course it totally depends on the budget and resources you have to work with as well.

I see what you are say about NFS vs. iscsi, NFS is very simplistic I just work with iscsi much more than NFS now so iscsi seems rather easy to manage. FreeBSD and OpenFiler are the two main NAS OS's I use I can say Freenas 7 offered great iscsi performance but always had troubles with NFS, might have been something I was doing. Openfiler seems neck and neck, but I notice lower latency with iscsi which is one reason I generally tend to use it over NFS.

But yeah I'll give the part in the OP a rework tonight.

Karthe posted:

We recently got into virtualization, but unfortunately neither I nor my cohort had any prior experience with it, aside from whatever personal dabbling we'd done in the past. As such, I feel like our VM environment is almost too simple - we've not dabbled in resource pools, I had no idea about not thin-provisioning SQL environments, we only have 10/100 switches and no NAS/SAN...Things have been Running Alright(tm), but there are just so many red flags in our setup that I hope to god we never have to deal with a serious virtual host catastrophe.

Aside from rolling back the clock and not implementing virtualization until we had the proper infrastructure in place, what are good resources for starters? I think I'll pick up the book recommended in the OP if it's good for beginners, but are there other "must read" sites/books/etc...?
Resource pools are usually implemented in places where resources are scarce and you need fine tweaking of the enviroment, generally I don't set them up unless it is clear that I can't get another box and am pushing my Host usage up into the upper 80% for ram/cpu. Small deployments for SQL(SQL express) in a thin provisioned environment can be done I know a few sharepoint servers running on thin provisions just fine but they have slower Writes when uploading documents or changing files. You don't have to have shared storage in a virtual environment, but it makes life a lot simpler for you in the event of a host hardware failure or the like.

this thread is good to ask questions in, no one here knows it all so ask anything regardless you trivial it may seem. The Scott lowe book is good for esxi 5 there is also a 4.1 too

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Feb 20, 2012 around 19:23

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

FISHMANPET posted:

We've got a couple of HyperV hosts, and I'd like to install some software on them to see how much horsepower is actually being used, with the idea of probably using fewer machines in the future, and also moving to VMWare anyway.

So, recommendations for a HyperV performance/utilization monitoring tool?

http://vtcommander.com/Products/vtCommander

that seems to be buzzing around the technet forums

Syano posted:

One change that probably needs to be made to the OP: While Hyper-v surely isnt in the same vein as vmware or xen as far as bare metal hypervisors go, it does not pass through the OS layer

You sure about that I was pretty sure hyper-v was a type 2 hypervisor has to go through the OS to get the hardware

http://www.maximumpc.com/files/u176...per_vm_full.jpg

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Feb 20, 2012 around 21:42

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

snip

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

Pantology posted:

It's type 1. Here's a good description of how it works:

http://www.virtuatopia.com/index.ph..._Virtualization

After installing the Hyper-V role, that instance of Windows is somewhat comparable to the ESX Service Console.

Ah, it works differently than I though, I was under the impression it did a different type of install good to know this thanks! Really doesn't feel that way when I install hyper-V from the add roles, didn't realize it went that deep

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Feb 20, 2012 around 22:52

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

Wait they removed VMware teams in 8?

The gently caress?

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

Fistfull of Jizz posted:

Oh

It is also fault tolerant! As we progressed we saw a ton of guests each with specs all over the place. A Windows XP(32bit) guest with 10GB of RAM reserved and 4 cpus with nothing at all installed just sitting there powered on and eating available resources. We haven't hired a replacement yet, and the letters "VMWARE" weren't anywhere in the PD they put out for him so it looks like I have to brush up on esxi and all the vWords.


My boss does that with our DC and some other VM's
14GB ram
4cores
250GB Zero thicked disk

For a Domain controller... other than windows chacing I haven't seen it use above 10GB from the logs

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

Alctel posted:

Ok, so this old chestnut, virtual, physical or appliance for VCenter?

Moving to Vcenter 5 from 4.1 and we had it on a physical box (since it makes things easier for upgrades etc) but 'best practice' is having it virtualised apparently.

What do y'all do? Our enviroment has 2 ESXi servers with around 20 VMs on

I have it virtualized, I gain HA and lose hardware dependancies, no problems to report

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

nvm

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Mar 2, 2012 around 02:17

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

Are you running iscsi by chance? I see those hiccups sometimes with iscsi, software iscsi has to offload on CPU so seeing spikes is somewhat normal. As long as your VM's seem to me functioning fine I wouldn't lose too much sleep over it

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

adorai posted:

anyone running a VMware cluster on AMD? we are going to eval a few HP DL165C 1U servers to possibly use in our next refresh this spring. We figure 16 "core"/128GB/4x 1Gbe is about right density wise. Just curious if I should expect disappointment from our eval.

Just use anandtech for reviews
http://www.anandtech.com/tag/IT
they give fair reviews of stuff.

I use some Opterons, they perform just as I would expect, amd is more price performance, intel does offer nicer power but at a price

http://www.anandtech.com/show/5058/...interlagos-6200
http://www.anandtech.com/show/5279/...a-closer-look/7

are reviews of the 16 core cpus

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Mar 9, 2012 around 02:42

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

http://www.vmware.com/partners/programs/

Anyone here a VMware partner? There are only 2 shops in our sister town(one is a reseller only), none in our City. I am pushing for us to become one, anyone have any stories tips to share I am all ears.

E: Or if you have any stories of working with a VMware partner on the job please share any experiences you can

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Mar 9, 2012 around 20:03

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

quicksand posted:

I work for one and hold the VSP5 and VTSP5 that let us stay a partner. Protip: Sales Certs are garbage. Let someone else do those.

But what specifically are you wondering?

Basically trying to get my IT firm as a VMware certified professional partner, since no other IT firm in our city is one, might as well become the first and only. Would go well with my vm cert anyway.

Basically the processes about going for them, the difficulty, any BS I should expect to encounter.

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

quicksand posted:

Not too sure on the red tape side of things, but I'll talk to the guy who went through that at work.

But to be a Professional partner in a solutions provider path (I assume, this is what we did as we are a VAR). You need to be a Registered partner first, which was pretty straight forward as far as I know. 0 cost for it, no requirements for certs or VMware Revenue requirements.

Once you are a Registered Partner, you need to have 1 VTSP and 1 VSP, these can both be the same person; or ideally, 2 people. One being a sales guy, because the VSP sucks unless you want to spend 20 hours watching videos on how to make elevator presentations to the CIO's assistant, and how to shift paradigms with VMware's Product Branding and blah blah blah blah.

Once you have a VSP and a VTSP, and I think > $1000 in yearly VMware sales, you just send them a check for $250 and Bob's your uncle.

Cool thanks sorta what I thought by looking at the vmware site. I won't mind the videos, I am sure my VCAP/VCP classes have covered the videos 10 times over.


One last question just because I know the person(s) above me will ask, I kinda know the answer but still
Would you say it created business, customers, or revenue for you? Was it noticeable or subtle(i know this depends on area) ?

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Mar 12, 2012 around 13:10

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

evil_bunnY posted:

The only thing that convinced customers to actually give us jobs were reference implementations we'd done before. Not being a partner might cost you a project, but in my experience having the box checked won't generate business, just enable it.

We got pretty good at upgrading Hypah-hypah installs with Essentials kits or implementing/expanding/upgrading small scale virtualization project before we started putting our fingers in bigger pies. I think the trick for us was expand scale and technical depth in consecutive steps.
We do a bit of virtualization at our current moment for smaller companies. Seeing out our city doesn't have any and our sister city only has 2(one is reseller only), comes very surprising for our area. Hopefully slapping VMware Professional Partner on our cards probably will turn some heads. Everyone seems to want a "private cloud infrastructure" getting the VMware name with us might help us address larger clients.

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

Sometimes Vmware is nice, my class gives me full access codes for all VM products with a 1 year life

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

madsushi posted:

Most people running home labs are using the free version of ESXi, so there's no 60-day limit. The timer only applies for the paid features (vCenter and everything it enables, etc).

I think he is using/wanting the features

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

It might not be your cup of tea but

If you want to learn scripting/PowerCLI, you can script a datacenter rebuild whit shared storage adapters and what not. Once you set the script all you need to to is run it again to pick up where you left off.

I might do a script like that and post it if anyone is interested, 3 hosts, 2 NAS, windows DC AD/NTP/DNS/gateway.

Might save some people time who are learning but run into the 60 day limit

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

Oh wow this VSP/VTSP,
"Did you know virtualization can run two machines on one physical host?"
"True or false virtualization can run Windows and Linux on the same host?"
"True or false Virtualization can help improve up time and lower TCO?"

Can't you all just take my VM certs and use those so I can skip this boredom, ~12 hrs of these videos and stuff I have to complete prior to getting Professional level partnership.

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

evil_bunnY posted:

Bring a book?

It's web base, and sadly a lot of the advice is incorrect or probably not good advice for anyone experienced in VMware. In one video it says cloud is great because "you don't have to have long meetings with the IT to spec out servers you just give exactly what you want!" that was almost word for word. I wouldn't say it is flat out wrong but any competent in Virtual infrastructure would argue some of these points. They also push a separate program, rather than talk about writing PowerCLI scripts and Vspheres logging to do reporting. Oh well guess that is why it is a sales cert

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

quicksand posted:

I told you the VSP is a bunch of worthless used car salesman bullshit.

The VTSP isn't as terrible. The best part about both of them is that you can start the course, refresh the partner university page, and click "Take Exam" or whatever, then just search through the slides using their handy dandy search feature, and write the test with them open!

It's how I did the VSP because seriously, gently caress sales.

Yeah but someone has to get them to be a professional partner might as well be me... Oh well 2 NFS vCenter enterprise licenses for 250 is worth it. Do the practice tests even count for anything on the VSP they seem to have no grading scale and constantly gently caress up in chrome

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

quicksand posted:

You have to pass them all 10 with an 80 to qualify as a VSP.

I'm trying to get our CEO to hook us up with the NFR licensing to test and play with, and he apparently has them according to the portal. But he has no idea what I am talking about.

The Internal Use Only licensing is also sweet, but I can't get them to fork out for the Enterprise Plus stuff (All that they seem to offer us), even at only ~1200/socket, which is practically stealing them.

Maybe I am not seeing them until after I fully complete it, all it has are practice quizzes(in the videos, with no identification of your score.

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Mar 14, 2012 around 19:05

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

hmm let's check my Open filer DRBD active/passive test build

WHAT DID I DO!?!?

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

FISHMANPET posted:

Uh, you have 64 Zettabytes?

I wish, I would open up a data hosting business ASAP, no this is a 4 (10GB) disk array, and for some reason this happened when I was waiting for stuff to sync.

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Mar 15, 2012 around 05:28

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

Anyone else getting crashes with installing vmware tools on Windows Server 8 beta? I totally lost the GUI and it locks up shortly after boot.

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug


Oh sweet thanks

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

Bitch Stewie posted:

So with just a pair of vSphere Standard hosts running 4.1 SP2, if/when we want to go to 5.0, is it worth upgrading or it just as simple to start over since other than the network and storage config there isn't that much to configure on each box?


If you don't have the stuff on box and everything via shared storage, you might just want to wipe them and load 5 fresh. Ofcourse it depends if you have scripts inplace to reset everything and how many you have. We did 4.1 ESX migrate to 5 and it worked fine other than a flaky HW controller but that was HW not a issue with 5

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

stubblyhead posted:

Has anyone gotten USB passthrough to work in VirtualBox? I've been struggling with it all weekend and just can't get it to connect, and it sounds like it's a pretty common problem. Can VMware Player do this with less hassle?

Works fine for me, VMware player does it with ease and will sometimes automatically connect the USB even if you don't want it to.

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

luminalflux posted:

Really? It doesn't swap to local disk at all?

I may be wrong but I believe you can choose where the swapping happens

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

Erwin posted:

This is a dumb question but I don't think the VMware Update Manager documentation explains how to upgrade the VM hardware from 7 to 8 on your Update Manager VM. I feel like if I try to remediate it, it'll just explode halfway through

Also, what about the vCenter VM? I feel like vCenter has to be running for Update Manager to do its thing.

power down the VM=>rightclick=>upgrade virtual hardware, I believe the binarys for the virtual hardware are kept on the ESXi host not vCenter or VUM.

Not sure the way via VUM

Orchastrator might do it but I am not sure
http://pubs.vmware.com/vsphere-50/i...A577244DE0.html

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Mar 27, 2012 around 20:34

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

adorai posted:

only partially related to virtualization, but can anyone recommend an FM1 motherboard that supports IOMMU? I want to build a new combo VMware / NAS box, passing my disk controller into the NAS VM via IOMMU.

Don't know of any F1's but this AM3 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...N82E16813131767 supports IOMMU. It's the board I use, it also supports 32GB ram which is an awesome +

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

evil_bunnY posted:

The only downside to learning the VMWare side of things is that it'll make Hyper-V intolerable.

This x100 this
I started out doing VMware, now my shop runs hyper-v, I hate hyper-v so much it is so much lackluster than ESXi, but head and shoulders over citrix(atleast for what I do) in terms of stability/performance

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

My templates are Core/Ram
1:2 per windows instance
1:1 per linux instance
but usually it turns into custom ratios depending on what the VM is doing

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

FISHMANPET posted:

So as I read through Masterping vSphere 5 and VMware vSphere Design, I'm mentally planning my departments virtualization build out (and my boss is listening to me on this, so I can't gently caress it up) and I decided to look for 10 Gb Switches.

http://www.dell.com/us/enterprise/p...hernet-switches

Looks like Cisco doesn't even have an equivalent, so I'm guessing nobody does yet. And we can get it for only $10k!

How much data are you moving again?

Not saying that 24Port 10Gb isn't awesome but how many can you get at that price? It might be more feasable to order some <12 port 10Gib as a backbone for Iscsi/NFS and vMotion, and run everything else on Gig or aggregated gig.

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Apr 6, 2012 around 03:37

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

FISHMANPET posted:

University pricing, so pretty much as many as I want. And right now we're probably a year out from anything (that's when the richest department's infrastructure goes out of contract) though when I actually think about it that's not a lot of time.

What are some other 10Gb switches? I'm not really sure which is better, fiber or copper, but for short ranges (100 m) CAT 6a can do 10Gb, so it seems like an easier proposition. Looking at everything Cisco has, most everything just has a couple SFP ports.

As for actual data, I have no idea yet, but I'm guessing we'll get 10Gb more because we can than anything. It's a fancy buzzword we can throw at decision makers, and it means we don't need a ton of ports and cabling to make everything fully redundant.

And if we didn't get those, we'd probably get 3750s because we're pretty dumb, so it's not like we save a ton of money doing something else.

Well depending on your environment and what throughput you need you may want to look at Fibre Channel, it may provide better performance for things that need high I/O and low latency like DB servers, front end web servers(that get constantly hit), and the like. It is a bit of a hit 8Gb/s but you latency is non exsistant if done right. 10Gb would be great for things like Vmotion, FT, or backup lines to the Data stores; and use Gig => 10Gig for web/other traffic.

10Gb is a great investment, and will give you a lot of growing room that you might want, but you might waste money on buying what you may not ever utilize fully.

If you set VM affinities right such as things like Spam filter servers for email on the Machine running the Email server you will cut a lot of traffic out, same with other servers that have to access each other, like servers that access a DB server or what not.

just my 2c but,

Depending on your environment I would do like this
High I/O servers/DB servers => Fiber Channel
High usage Mission Critical servers => 10Gb/E
Other servers and web(access) => 1Gb/E
Run Affinities to keep servers that have relations to run on the same host

Cause to utilize those 10Gb switches ya going to need 10Gb network cards


E: You might also want to look into SSD caching for some of the servers it can really prove useful

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Apr 6, 2012 around 04:07

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

FISHMANPET posted:

We'll most likely be getting a Compellent SAN with an SSD tier, so that's taken care of (I assume that's what you mean by SSD caching?).

I did some messing around with pricing, and I don't think the value is there for Fiber Channel. An 8 Gb FC card is $700, a dual port 10Gb is $600. Add in the cost of FC switches and it starts to not look very great. Though FCoE could be useful, assuming it uses the same physical connections on the SAN as regular 10Gb.

I also think that politically, anything FC would be a tough sell to the rest of staff. We just recently started using iSCSI for some storage, we've got a simple array that's a couple years old, and that's pretty much it. Even then we're basically using it as direct attached SCSI. So change is tough.

We're working on that overall, but it's nice in a case like this I think to point out a few areas that won't change (or at least we're not buying hardware that forces a change). If everything is loaded up with 10Gb it's a lot easier to switch to FCoE when we've fudged it saying we'll start with iSCSI.

It looks like the Intel X520 and X540 (the cards I'd be using) support FCoE, though not sure about switching FCoE. Guess I need to dig into that awful EMC storage book again.

E: Looks like the 8024 does... something with FCoE:

E2: I guess so, this sounds useful, right?


Our network admin is still scared of link aggregation, so no chance of any help in that department. Just another thing I gotta figure out myself.
Yeah it isn't something you buy lots of, you would by maybe 1-2 8 port switches, and hook them to 4ish hosts(assuming you want a full mesh) The real gain in using FC is the lack of latency, 10GbE w/ FCoE would be a good choice if you don't want to spend the cash on full blown FC, the main thing you are trying to eliminate is the TCP encapsulation and the wait for a reply before sending the next packet, drastically cutting latency.
more here http://www.unifiedcomputingblog.com/?p=108

As far as your net admin goes re assure him that you can have a stand-by/failover nic for port aggregation

Of course I don't know how many servers you have or want to consolidate so only take what I say as something to consider.

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

Serfer posted:


Go vmware!

Are you trying to do this with the VM's on or off? If you need to keep it on I believe you can do it with a vmotion

Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

Sylink posted:

How good are the save my server 1750s and whatnot?

I really need a home server for practicing new and exciting stuff but most servers I come across are expensive?

Great for ESXi 4.1

get an SSD, 32GB ram and a x6 and you can run just as and don't have to worry about X many serversand run VMware in virtualbox or the vmware 2012 beta

Dilbert As FUCK fucked around with this message at Apr 10, 2012 around 03:21

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Dilbert As FUCK
Sep 8, 2007

by Cowcaster


Pillbug

FISHMANPET posted:

So I'm reading through Scott Lowe's "Mastering VMware vSphere 5" and I have to ask, does it get any better? I just started the networking chapter, but after 4 chapters of "Launch the vSphere Client if it is not already running, and connect to a vCenter Server instance." I'm getting pretty exhausted of being taught how to bush buttans.

You can always do everything via powerCLI to make it a bit more challenging, but if you did the 4 then 5 will seem dry

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