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Ritznit
Dec 19, 2012

I'm crackers for cheese.



Ultra Carp

The company my husband works at got wind of me being an artist, and has now asked me to design a mascot for them. They love the design ideas I showed them! Yay! Next, we'll meet to discuss specifics. My problem is that I've never done anything for an actual company and not just half-broke nerds, so I could use pricing advice. What should I roughly charge a mid-size IT company for a mascot design as well as the full rights to the character?

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gmc9987
Jul 25, 2007


Jazz Marimba posted:

Last year I got a large format printer for printing out 11x17 sheet music scores. A friend just asked me how much it would cost to print 300qty 7” record sleeves. He would be supplying the paper. I’m not sure how much to charge for that (or anything really), or where to look up standard rates or how to calculate them. Help?

Maybe I'm confused, but this sounds like a friend wants to borrow your printer to print something that he already designed and bought paper for? Just charge him the cost of however many ink cartridges he ends up using, or just tell him to purchase a few beforehand in addition to the paper since 300 copies is going to use up at least a few at high quality settings.

Unless he's asking you to do something that takes substantial amounts of time away from your own life, like designing the record label for him (or if he's more of a "friend" rather than an actual friend), I don't see any reason to charge him more than the cost of materials.

lofi
Apr 2, 2018






If it's inkjet you're going to chew through cartridges. I have no idea how you'd work it out, beyond "let's do 60 and see what that does to the ink" (charging them for replacements, natch). If you want commercial rates just look for a printshop near you and see what they'd charge.

Honestly, the whole thing sounds like a massive pain in the tits, I'd tell them you can't do 600.

Tubgoat
Jun 30, 2013



Ritznit posted:

The company my husband works at got wind of me being an artist, and has now asked me to design a mascot for them. They love the design ideas I showed them! Yay! Next, we'll meet to discuss specifics. My problem is that I've never done anything for an actual company and not just half-broke nerds, so I could use pricing advice. What should I roughly charge a mid-size IT company for a mascot design as well as the full rights to the character?

Full rights? Can you get a percentage of gross? Though admittedly, how revenue generated by any specific mascot is measured, I haven't the slightest idea.

Also for ink printers running low, remove the cartridge and slosh the ink back and forth slowly a few times, we always got a massively extended life from them that way.

Tubgoat fucked around with this message at 12:31 on Sep 30, 2019

Franchescanado
Feb 23, 2013


If it wasn't for disappointment,
I wouldn't have any appointment.





Grimey Drawer

What websites do any of you use for selling prints?

I've been using ArtStation to build up a portfolio. They have a marketplace where people can order prints/posters/canvases, but I haven't really dabbled in it.

Until I'm financially in a place where I can do limited runs of prints to sell or have my own website, are there better places to put up art and have people buy prints?

TheHan
Oct 29, 2011

Grind, you poor fool!
Grind straight for the stars!

Franchescanado posted:

What websites do any of you use for selling prints?

I've been using ArtStation to build up a portfolio. They have a marketplace where people can order prints/posters/canvases, but I haven't really dabbled in it.

Until I'm financially in a place where I can do limited runs of prints to sell or have my own website, are there better places to put up art and have people buy prints?

A lotta my friends use Threadless, which does let you do canvases and prints, since they handle the production end of things you only have to pay costs with money from your orders.

Ritznit
Dec 19, 2012

I'm crackers for cheese.



Ultra Carp

Tubgoat posted:

Full rights? Can you get a percentage of gross? Though admittedly, how revenue generated by any specific mascot is measured, I haven't the slightest idea.

Yeah I'm afraid that's not feasible. This isn't a mascot intended for one specific marketing campaign, it's meant for a product that will be sold to different companies. The mascot is basically meant to be the face of the product. So, I don't think I can ask for a percentage considering the product was going to be sold anyway, and it's hard to determine whether it was the mascot or the actual product features that clinched the deal.

The idea is more that I will give them full rights to the character, and that I will be the person to go to for any extra illustrations of the character. So, I want to be paid for the rights to the character as well as each following illustration, which they will also have full right to use.

gmc9987
Jul 25, 2007


Ritznit posted:

Yeah I'm afraid that's not feasible. This isn't a mascot intended for one specific marketing campaign, it's meant for a product that will be sold to different companies. The mascot is basically meant to be the face of the product. So, I don't think I can ask for a percentage considering the product was going to be sold anyway, and it's hard to determine whether it was the mascot or the actual product features that clinched the deal.

The idea is more that I will give them full rights to the character, and that I will be the person to go to for any extra illustrations of the character. So, I want to be paid for the rights to the character as well as each following illustration, which they will also have full right to use.

Well, I can't give you specific pricing info but it sounds like you're on the right track. For full rights, I'd say that even 2x or 3x the price you'd normally charge for repro rights wouldn't be insane. Also make sure to specify in your contract that you have the right of first refusal (pretty sure that's the right term I'm looking for, someone else please correct me if it's wrong) when it comes to producing new artwork of the character or making alterations to the design - you want to have it in writing that the company has to give you the option to produce the new artwork and can only seek out another designer if you are unwilling or unable to take on the work for whatever reasons.

For anyone looking at the thread wondering why full rights transfer would cost more than just reproduction rights when it's the same amount of work on the designer's part (I know I used to wonder that when I was in school): Basically, every right you transfer to the company in full (the right to use it in any media they want, the right to make alterations to the design to suit new uses not present when the initial design was completed, the right to produce new artworks based on the original design, etc.) allows the company to make more money off your original work, without consulting you. The additional money isn't being greedy, it's you offsetting the fact that you're giving the company the ability to make more money off your artwork without your input.

Jazz Marimba
Jan 4, 2012



This might not be right spot, so direct me elsewhere if needed (there arenít any business threads in Musicianís Lounge, sigh)

I music directed a musical at a college in September/October. Payment was divided into two lump sum checks. Myself and the musicians received our first checks on time. The second was supposed to be mailed the Friday after closing night (two musicians opted to pick theirs up in person). Itís been two weeks and no oneís received their checks. What can I do?

readingatwork
Jan 8, 2009

Hello Fatty!




Fun Shoe

Itís a bit early to panic. Did you try calling them and asking whatís up?

Jazz Marimba
Jan 4, 2012



readingatwork posted:

Itís a bit early to panic. Did you try calling them and asking whatís up?

Ope, nvm, got mine in the mail yesterday, just hadnít checked the mail, and a couple others got theirs too

I was concerned because during the show the theatre manager said there were a couple factors often leading to late disbursements

Neon Noodle
Nov 11, 2016

there's nothing wrong here in montana

Let us celebrate an artist getting paid

gmc9987
Jul 25, 2007


Sk8ers4Christ
Mar 10, 2008

Lord, I ask you to watch over me as I pop an ollie off this 50-foot ramp. If I fail, I'll be seeing you.

I made an art that someone liked, and now they want to use the art on a set of cards they're creating and feature it in a Youtube video. They claim they are only going to share the video with friends and "the community who also play the game" (Magic the Gathering). They claim they do not plan to make money off of it, and it's just a hobby. They also claim that they will credit me.

This was just a piece I made last year that they happened to like, and I wasn't planning on making money off of it anyway. I'm thinking as long as they're not making a profit from it, and they fully credit me, it's fine. It isn't a project that they asked me to work on for free, so it costs me nothing, and to me it's not any worse than re-posting my artwork on another site and crediting me. But does anyone see an issue with this?

lofi
Apr 2, 2018






Get it in writing that they won't profit and that they'll take it down if you change your mind.

Doctor Zero
Sep 21, 2002

Would you like a jelly baby?
It's been in my pocket through 4 regenerations,
but it's still good.

Do you have any idea how many people still play MTG?

gmc9987
Jul 25, 2007


They basically told you, "I only intend to share it with [group of people so vaguely defined as to be useless in guessing how many people it is]."

I would say don't let this person post it online unless it's an image that you're willing to have publicly online, forever. If you're OK with that (and you can be, if you want) then go for it. But MtG isn't exactly an unknown game with a small community, and anyone who sees the image online could potentially save the image and share it further. Or crop your credit off of it. Or upload it to one of a million print-on-demand sites that don't bother checking for copyright when letting people sell prints on them. So there's nothing inherently wrong with having your artwork posted online, just be aware that there's potential for it to spread beyond the intended audience or usage, and if that's potentially a problem then you're better off not giving this person access to your art.

Also, what does this:

Sk8ers4Christ posted:

They claim they do not plan to make money off of it, and it's just a hobby.

mean? This person's hobby is to post other peoples artwork online? Or they play the game as a hobby?

Neon Noodle
Nov 11, 2016

there's nothing wrong here in montana

lofi posted:

Get it in writing that they won't profit and that they'll take it down if you change your mind.

Dr. Fishopolis
Aug 31, 2004

ROBOT

lofi posted:

Get it in writing that they won't profit and that they'll take it down if you change your mind.

Even easier: Attach a creative commons license to it! You want this one: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Also, send them an email explaining exactly what it is, and what it means.

Sk8ers4Christ
Mar 10, 2008

Lord, I ask you to watch over me as I pop an ollie off this 50-foot ramp. If I fail, I'll be seeing you.

Thanks everyone! I got it in writing that they would not profit from it. They're also willing to send me the video once it's done, so I can make sure I got credit.

gmc9987 posted:

They basically told you, "I only intend to share it with [group of people so vaguely defined as to be useless in guessing how many people it is]."

I would say don't let this person post it online unless it's an image that you're willing to have publicly online, forever. If you're OK with that (and you can be, if you want) then go for it. But MtG isn't exactly an unknown game with a small community, and anyone who sees the image online could potentially save the image and share it further. Or crop your credit off of it. Or upload it to one of a million print-on-demand sites that don't bother checking for copyright when letting people sell prints on them. So there's nothing inherently wrong with having your artwork posted online, just be aware that there's potential for it to spread beyond the intended audience or usage, and if that's potentially a problem then you're better off not giving this person access to your art.

Also, what does this:


mean? This person's hobby is to post other peoples artwork online? Or they play the game as a hobby?

I should have clarified. They saw the artwork on my social media, so it's already online. That's the main reason why I didn't think it was a big deal, since I knew that type of stuff was bound to happen. I'm just glad someone asked permission.

They meant they do not make cards as a profession. Creating custom cards is their hobby.

Doctor Zero posted:

Do you have any idea how many people still play MTG?

That part was very vague. I had no idea if they meant the entire MTG community or the community where they play. I don't think it matters though, since, as I wrote above, I already have the image online. As long as they credit me, I'm cool with more people seeing it.

gmc9987
Jul 25, 2007


Ahh cool. Glad that worked out for you, the way you wrote the initial post I didn't know the image was already viewable online.

HenryJLittlefinger
Jan 31, 2010

stomp clap


Gonna crosspost this in the little questions thread, but I figured here would be a good spot to ask as well.

I'm commissioning my niece to convert an ink drawing I did to a vector file (is this the right term?) so I can have some shirts or stickers printed. I'm not going to sell the stuff, got no plans to license the design, profit from it in any way, or any of that. I just like the drawing and some other people do too, enough to want a sticker or shirt maybe. Anyhow, I'm sending her a scan of the drawing, and she says she should be able to do it in Illustrator pretty easily. She's a junior in an art program at a big university, very good at what she does, extremely hard working, all that. So I want to pay her the appropriate rate, but I'm not entirely sure she'll give me the fair market price since we're family.

So if some rando from the internet emailed you a drawing, said "convert to an image file that could be used with screen printing or vinyl stickers, go hog wild cleaning up whatever you think needs it," what would you charge?

lofi
Apr 2, 2018






Depends how clean the initial scan is, and how detailed the pic is - the job could be anywhere from 'mash autoconvert' to 'trace everything by hand'

HenryJLittlefinger
Jan 31, 2010

stomp clap


lofi posted:

Depends how clean the initial scan is, and how detailed the pic is - the job could be anywhere from 'mash autoconvert' to 'trace everything by hand'

It's a fairly clean scan, but I'm assuming she'll be tracing everything by hand. It's a moderately detailed, but not especially complex line drawing. I don't call myself an artist, but I've put 3-4 hours into it, most of which was tracing new drafts from the first one.

gmc9987
Jul 25, 2007


HenryJLittlefinger posted:

It's a fairly clean scan, but I'm assuming she'll be tracing everything by hand. It's a moderately detailed, but not especially complex line drawing. I don't call myself an artist, but I've put 3-4 hours into it, most of which was tracing new drafts from the first one.

If the scan is clean and high-res enough for printing, Illustrator can do a pretty good job of auto-tracing in two colors with a press of a button. I would say to offer an hourly rate of ~$30USD/hr. with a minimum payment of 1 hour. Even if she only has to hit a button to trace it, she's doing you a solid and you sound like someone who values artistic work and not taking advantage of family members soÖ

And if she has to trace it all by hand for some reason, she won't get shorted out of some money. If you think she won't accept a price that high (which isn't actually that high but students/beginner artists often critically undervalue their work) then maybe don't mention the price to her and just ask how long it took and then shove the money in her hand (or bank account) and run away before she can refuse.

Also nice av, I love that music video so much.

HenryJLittlefinger
Jan 31, 2010

stomp clap


Awesome, thank you. Between this thread and the question thread, yall have given me a good idea. I'll see what she gets back to me with and make sure she gets a little extra on top if what she quotes me seems too low.

Peeches
May 24, 2018



Hi, new here. Just a little intro, I am a graphic artist/designer. I have been finding some work on facebook and reddit. I have had no problem getting paid... yet. so far everything is pretty simple and I love doing supplemental work to pay for that adobe cloud subscription. though I would love to do more traditional stuff like murals.

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kedo
Nov 27, 2007



Oh my sweet summer child...

If you want to keep getting paid, make sure you have a contract for all your gigs, no matter how small (unless you do already, in which case please ignore me!)

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