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SUPER HASSLER
Jan 31, 2005





Click on this if you'd like to try trading beer with goony goons
Goon Beer eXchange Thread

Click on this if you'd like to stalk them on Untappd too
GoonTappd

Looking for beer destinations by city? Check out the Goons with Brews wiki (edit it, even, if you like)

Hello



And welcome to the third Let's talk beer thread on GWS. We sit here and post all day about beer, breweries, beer reviews, beer travel, things to eat with beer, things to do while drinking beer, and how dreamy the beard on that one guy in the Sam Adams commercials is. Somehow this sort of thing has managed to become the biggest thread in GWS. Who knew. A new thread has been posted up at mod request and in order to shake things up a bit.

General GWS rules apply -- keep discussion decently purposeful, don't pick on other people's beer preferences (too much), and try to keep the thread from degenerating into idle chatting.

Don't be afraid to participate, however, especially if you're new and/or curious about beer. We love new people! Beer's at its best when it's shared among other folks, after all.

NOTE: Despite what you may see at bars, you are not actually required to grow an unkempt, scraggly neckbeard in order to be a beer fan. Don't throw out those razors!

A word about beer



Beer -- a drink made chiefly out of water, malted grain (usually barley or wheat), yeast, and hops -- is old. Very old. Arguably the oldest alcoholic beverage ever. As Garrett Oliver writes, the history of beer is "quite literally the history of human civilization." The best estimate we have is that the secret behind brewing beer was stumbled upon around 5000 years ago in Sumeria. It never really caught on in ancient Greece and Rome, but was a hit in western Europe -- by the year 1376, there were 475 breweries in the city of Hamburg alone, pushing out around 113,000 barrels per year. Thirsty serfs.

Beer was brought to America on the Mayflower and local breweries popped up immediately thereafter. The industry boomed worldwide in the 1800s, but two world wars and 13 years of Prohibition changed beer enormously in the Americas. After the war, the business was dominated by mass-market golden lager which, while a technical achievement to make, was low in flavor and generally designed to be cheap and easy for baby-boomers to drink by the case. What's worse, this crap was also being brewed by an increasingly shrinking group of enormous brewing conglomerates. In 1900, there were around 2000 breweries in the US; by 1978, when Jimmy Carter signed a law that legalized homebrewing, there were only 82.

But all wasn't lost. Smaller breweries began to pop up in the UK in the late 1970s, and the trend moved quickly over to the US. Places like New Albion (1976), Boulder Beer (1979) and Sierra Nevada (which pushed out their first batch of Pale Ale in November 1980) set the stage for a revolution in brewing, experimenting with older styles and exercising their creativity with things like IPAs, stouts, amber ales, and flavorings like chocolate and fruit.

Nowadays there are 1927 operating breweries in the US (as of last November), and the craft-beer revolution has taken hold on a massive, worldwide scale. It's an exciting time for beer fans, and if you're still a $2 PBR kind of person, now's the best time ever to start trying a few other things, all right?

Beer terms/background knowledge



IBUs (International Bitterness Units): A measure of bitterness in beer. The higher this is, the more hoppy/bitter-tasting the beer will generally be. The Bud Lights of the world have around 5-10 IBUs, while the extreme imperial IPAs can go up to 100 and higher. It's usually around 60 IBUs or so when you start remarking to yourself how hoppy the beer is.

ABV: Alcohol by volume. The amount of alcohol in the beer you're drinking. Generally speaking, a beer's alcohol level depends on the type of grain used, as well as how much is used in the recipe -- it's the sugars in these grains that get turned into alcohol by the yeast. Most beer is between 3-6% ABV, with stronger stouts and IPAs going up to 8-9% and higher. Depending on where you live in the US and Canada, supermarkets/convenience stores may not be allowed to sell beer higher than a certain value, often 3.2%.

Bomber/growler: A bomber is a 22-oz bottle often used by craft brewers for selling their less common/more alcoholic/nerdier beer varieties. The European version is 750ml, about 25oz. A growler is a half-gallon jar with twist-off cap; mainly used for "take-out beer" from breweries or bars, in states where that's legal.

Glassware: Some people really care about glassware. Serious beer bars will bust out different glasses for each style of beer (or even for individual beers, especially Belgians). Some glasses are mostly traditional in origin, such as the goofy one Pauwel Kwak comes in, but others are shaped to show off color, keep the foam head intact, and allow as much of the beer's aroma to come through to your nose. Here's a guide.

Bottles 'n cans: Most beer comes in bottles that are tinted brown in order to keep UV and visible light from coming in and spoiling the beer (making it "lightstruck") before its time. You will notice that some beer, mostly macro, is put out in green or clear bottles. These offer no protection against UV light, and some breweries take steps to get around this, but either way don't trust the beer inside.

Cans are growing increasingly popular with small breweries. They're lighter, cheaper, more easily recycled, offer the best light protection, and can be taken out to places where glass is prohibited. Don't look down on a craft beer just because it's canned. (Still a good idea to pour it out into another cup first, though.)

Goofy laws: After Prohibition was repealed, different state governments had different ideas about how to regulate alcohol. The result is a dizzying patchwork of laws that make any brewery distributing in multiple states want to kill themselves. Some states do not allow beer sales on Sundays; some require it only be sold in liquor stores; a couple (Alabama and Mississippi, of course) still ban homebrewing. Then there's Pennsylvania, which is its own realm of crazy.

Cask conditioned beer/"real" ale: Unfiltered beer that's stored in a cask for secondary fermentation instead of placed in a pressurized, carbonated keg. This leads to higher alcohol content, as well as aging (which results in different flavors over time). Served off a "beer engine" which the bartender has to manually pump. Big in Britain. The main reason American tourists think that British people like warm beer. Some beer is "bottle conditioned" for a similar effect.

Brettanomyces (Brett): A genus of wild yeast that's generally considered undesirable, but is used in certain beers (Belgian lambics/gueuzes, New Belgium's Lips of Faith series, etc) for a fruity, sour effect. The resulting flavor is often called "barnyard" or "horse blanket" by beeradvocate forum posters trying to look smart. (Do not use these terms in real life, unless you actually brew with Brett or you are actually a horse.)

Dogfish Head: A brewery/microdistillery established in Milton, DE in 1995 by the likable and telegenic Sam Calagione. Largely known in the industry for being intensely experimental, doing stuff like brewing beer with algae, chemically analyzing residue on ancient drinking vessels and making beer based off it, and so forth. The resulting beer is original, if not necessarily good all the time.

3 Floyds: A microbrewery in Munster, IN which beer geeks worldwide have the worst hard-on for. Known for intensely-flavored beers and for Dark Lord, a Russian imperial stout. Dark Lord is released once per year at the brewery, an event called Dark Lord Day that's turned into a massive party/bottle-share. The aftermarket prices on Dark Lord bombers, especially the rarer variations, are a bit nuts.

A few basic beer styles (lightest to darkest)



Pilsner Invented in Pilzen, in today's Czech Republic, in the mid-1840s. Golden in color and bearing a distinct hop aroma. By far the most popular style of beer, with something like 95% of all global beer volume done in pilsner style.
Examples: Pilsner Urquell ("the original"), Warsteiner, Victory Prima Pils, Sam Adams Noble Pils. Nearly every cheap macrobrew is a pilsner in style, although they're very different from the real thing, filled with adjuncts to lighten the color and flavor.

Wheat: Beer brewed with a large proportion of wheat. This is probably how the Sumerians did it 5000 years ago, although it's not so common nowadays. Can be further divided into witbier (popularized by Hoegaarden) and weissbier ("white beer" in German, available in lots of forms). Witbier has a certain haziness and often has a sour, spicy flavor; weissbier can have a range of wheat flavors, from light to dark.
Examples: Hoegaarden, Celis, Paulaner, Franziskaner, Boulevard Unfiltered Wheat, Troegs Dreamweaver

India Pale Ale (IPA): Beer characterized by lots of alcohol and hop bitterness. A lot of restaurant menus will say that this evolved as a beer capable of surviving the ship journey from England to outposts in India in the 18th century. This is actually a myth; the (very small) India market of the time just liked really hoppy ales, and the brewer that supplied most of the ships to India happened to produce really hoppy beer. The style all but died out in the 20th century before getting revived by craft brewers seeking intense flavors in the '80s; it helped that American hops tend to have more powerful flavor and aroma than European plants. Nowadays there are many variants, such as black IPAs, double IPAs or even imperial IPAs, that try to push the bitter flavor envelope ever further. Occasionally people criticize this as resulting in nerdy, expensive crap that no one but utter beer snobs would enjoy.
Examples: Sierra Nevada Celebration, Bell's Two Hearted Ale, Dogfish Head 60/75/90/120 Minute IPA, Russian River Pliny The Elder , Saint Arnold Endeavor (out today!), really every microbrewer ever has an example so check your local one out

Amber: Not a style so much as a term American breweries invented for "beer somewhere between pale and brown in flavor/color". Tends to feature decent bitter flavor mixed with medium-to-dark malt sweetness.
Examples: Bell's Amber Ale, Alaskan Autumn, Anderson Valley Boont Amber

Saison: French for season, originally a low-alcohol pale ale brewed in the French-speaking part of Belgium for farmhands to drink during harvests. A little hard to define, as it can come in all kinds of colors, bodies and sweetnesses, but generally they're very dry, carbonated, and often fruity/sour. Another formerly near-dead style that craft brewers have brought back in quantity.
Examples: Saison Dupont (the standard bearer), Boulevard Tank 7, The Bruery Saison Rue, Ommegang Hennepin. There's a brewery in Colorado that does nothing but saisons.

Brown Ale: Generally British beers with a sweet to bitter and malty flavor. Another very broad term -- included in this is everything from mild ales (a very low-alcohol but still malty and flavorful style) to darker caramel/chocolate-tinged varieties.
Examples: Newcastle Brown Ale (get it in cans, bottles in the US are lightstruck and taste crappier), Samuel Smith Nut Brown, Smuttynose Old Brown Dog Ale, Dogfish Head Indian Brown

Stout/Porter: Stouts are dark/black beers made with roasted malt. They come in a variety of flavors, from the toasty-ish Guinness all the way to the intensely alcoholic Russian imperial stouts. Porters are closely related to stouts and tend to be a little easier on the alcohol. Like IPAs, this style is often home to races between nerdier craft breweries to see how original they can be with it -- stouts have been brewed with coffee, chocolate, oatmal, peanut butter, cookie dough, you name it. Beer nerds love this style and nearly all of the beers on Ratebeer.com's top 50 are imperial stouts.
Examples: Guinness, Young's Double Chocolate Stout, Avery Out of Bounds, Bell's Kalamazoo Stout are all basics. On the extreme side there's Three Floyds Dark Lord, Jester King Black Metal, Goose Island Bourbon County Stout, Cigar City Hunahpu's, BrewDog Tokyo etc.

Sours/Belgians: An entire world of its own. Can be somewhat advanced beer-drinking, but it's totally worth it if you've got a curious palate. Look at the post below this for a full intro.

Further reading



Books:
Michael Jackson (no, not that one), who died in 2007, was an incredible writer/traveler and one of the pioneers of the craft beer renaissance. He wrote a ton of wonderful and approachable books about beer, including The Great Beers of Belgium and Michael Jackson's Great Beer Guide.

Garrett Oliver, owner/brewmaster at Brooklyn Brewery, wrote The Brewmaster's Table, a fantastic guide to how craft beer is made and how to pair it up with food for great results. More recently he edited The Oxford Companion to Beer, an encyclopedic yet very engaging volume containing everything you'd possibly want to know about the subject.

There are several US magazines/newspapers on the subject, including (in no order) Beer Advocate, DRAFT, All About Beer, Beer, Ale Street News, Celebrator Beer News, and the assorted Brewing News regional newspapers.

Websites:
The two largest beer-rating websites are beeradvocate.com and ratebeer.com. Beeradvocate is larger and a good resource for looking up basic facts/ratings on any beer you can think of, but the forums are full of enraged beer nerds and the user reviews can often go into nonsensical geeky bullshit. Ratebeer offers a much better interface and also makes it a lot easier to look up locations and reviews of breweries/bars.

Untappd is one of a number of beer-related social media sites. It's my favorite because it's fast, bare-bones and does exactly what I want it to do and no more. It has native iPhone and Android apps.

There are tons and tons of beer blogs nowadays, and instead of recommending any particular one I suggest just googling "beer blog [name of city]" and the best local one will probably be up top. In CO, at least, Fermentedly Challenged is by far the best.

Old beer thread (9/11 - 3/12?)
Older beer thread (4/07 - 9/11)

This post was brought to you by:
Backcountry Breakfast Stout
Pug Ryan's Funky Monk Belgian Ale
Elysian Avatar Jasmine IPA


One final note

Don't drink and drive.

I feel obliged to write about this a bit more because a friend got popped for DUI a bit ago after drinking a tremendous amount. He's lucky in that the worst he'll likely face is a fine, but DUI most often means probation, interlocking devices on your cars, suspended licenses, and so on -- and that's assuming you don't cause any damage/injury. Some states have mandatory prison terms if you blow over a certain amount. It's never worth it.

If you do drink and drive, don't hit me.

SUPER HASSLER fucked around with this message at Apr 28, 2013 around 02:32

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SUPER HASSLER
Jan 31, 2005



Lots of words about sour beers:

quadrophrenic posted:

Hey goons, Certified Cicerone and former brewing industry lackey quadrophrenic here, and I want to make an effortpost about my favorite family of beers, sour beers.

Without going too much into the (really really fascinating) chemistry behind it, I'll lay down a broad definition of sour beer as any beer that derives most of its character from microorganisms other than Saccharomyces, brewer's yeast.*

Some of these bugs are the same bugs that turn milk into yogurt or wine into vinegar. Some of the more nefariously infectious organisms in the "sour bugs" category (namely, the Brettanomyces genus of yeast, the crazy funky cousin of brewers yeast,) are considered unacceptable flaws in winemaking AND brewing.

Sour beers were of course the first beers ever produced - long before we had cultivated Saccharomyces as a baker's yeast, we relied on the divinity of the winds and the sanctity of old brewing relics (the magic family brewing spoon!) to ferment our bowls of leftover porridge, and the results were the first "spontaneously-fermented" or "wild" beers. Since then, the unique character of these beers has been developed through history, mostly in Belgian/French brewing traditions but some notable pre-lager German styles are tart as well. The style has seen a resurgence among craft brewers worldwide, with Italian and Dutch sours gaining recognition, and of course American craft breweries have put their own unique spin on them.

So what do they taste like? Pretty varied. I've had sours that tasted like Jolly Ranchers, I've had sours that tasted like gym socks, I've had sours that tasted like out-of-date Cherry Coke. In a good way. It's a pretty varied family, so let's look at the stylez:

The two most prominent traditions of sour brewing are Lambic and Flemish, both primarily Belgian.

LAMBIC

Lambic beers are EU-certified and can only be made in the Pajottenland near Brussels, with the only exception granted to the Cantillon brewery in the nearby Senne valley. They are unique in the yeast used to make them, Brettanomyces Lambicus, native to the region, but they are also unique in how they are made. All Lambics are made with at least 30% wheat, and they almost all used aged hops, which, in addition to having less antibacterial power than fresh hops, have a lovely "moldy cheese" aroma.

When the Lambic brewers just make a fresh sour ale at the brewery and serve it at the brewery, it's called an Unblended Lambic. I find the taste of most straight Lambics patently offensive; they're undercarbonated, bracingly tart, lacking any sort of body, and they have a raw minerally taste. If you're adventerous, though, I recommend Drie Fonteinen's Lambiek. 3 Font is really less a brewer and more a blender, but they know their stuff when it comes to unblended.

Usually how you'll find Lambics, though, is blended. A blend of 1 year old and 3 year old Lambic is called Gueuze, and it's probably the most "classic" recognized sour style. Gueuzes are spritzly and sour in a more pleasant and refreshing way than their unblended cousins, yet still retain the complexity of the multitudes of microorganisms involved in their brewing. My favorite beer in the entire world is called Girardin Gueuze Unfiltered and it's crisp and refreshing and tastes like bright tart lemongrass and hay and must. It sounds revolting to most people, but it's really wonderful on a hot day.

If you added some kind of fruit to your Lambic at any point (pre-ferm, post-ferm, during blending) then you'd have a fruit Lambic. The two most popular are Framboise (raspberry), and Kriek (Morello cherry), but also common are Peche (peach) and Cassis (blackcurrant), and occasionally Cantillon will throw out some weird grape or blackberry one every few years. Generally, these are offered in a line by the big Lambic breweries (Boon, Hanssens, Beersel, Girardin,) and can more or less be judged by the brewery, since breweries generally use the same methods for all their fruit Lambics.. The best fruit Lambics are made by Cantillon. They're also some of the most expensive. Boon is a lovely, more affordable alternative. I would avoid Lindemans unless you're very very new to sours; adventurous imbibers might be turned off by the cough syrup-like sweetness.

FLEMISH

This is a very different, less diverse, but still very popular small family of sours from Flanders in the north of Belgium. Many of them do use Brett to obtain their primary fermentation, but Flemish sours are more defined by the other bugs used: namely, Pediococcus and Lactobacillus (the friendly lactic acid bacteria that give us wonderful cheese) and Acetobacter, which eats alcohol and gives us acetic acid.

As such, Flemish sours are generally less goaty and more vinegary then Lambics, and often have a delicate, cola-like flavor and sweetness with a underlying tartness and funkiness that serves as a supporting player rather than the main act. Flemish sours have been called "the champagne of beers", and while at least 10 different other beers and styles have laid claim to that title, Flemish sours are certainly more deserving of it than Miller High Life.

Flemish sours can be divided into two very very fuzzy categories, Red and Brown. Red is made with special Belgian red malt, which does actually give the beer a rich red color and prominent caramel flavor. Brown is made with regular ol' caramel malt, and most browns tend to be less about the malt and more about the acrid bacteria farts. Yum! The two big Flemish Reds are Duchesse De Bourgogne and Rodenbach. I prefer the latter because it's more offensive, but it's hard not to feel like a special person when you're drinking the Duchesse.



And don't forget all those wonderful non-Belgian sours as well! American craft brewers, specifically, have been really willing especially in the last 10 years or so to dick around with the style and put their own crazy spin on things. Two notable lines of sours brewed by American brewers are New Belgium's Lips of Faith and Russian River's Belgian-Style Ales series, a.k.a. the -ations. Personally, I love them both. New Belgium's is less interesting to me but ultimately more consistent and appetizing than RR's lineup. But for my money, it doesn't get any better than every beer ever made by Jolly Pumpkin of Michigan. They're an extremely innovative brewery that makes exclusively spontaneously fermented wild ales, following more or less no format or tradition whatsoever. They make quality beers.

Sorry this might have run a little long, but if you've never tried sour beers before, you should go to your nearest cool bottle shop (I bet you have one you don't know about) and try one out. You might be surprised!


*note that I said character and not alcohol. many of the bacteria associated with sour beers do not produce alcohol at all (pediococcus, lactobacillus) and many of them in fact consume alcohol produced by the actual fungus (acetobacter). Most sour beers get their alcohol from the Brettanomyces genus of yeast, but not all bretted beer are sours and not all sours are bretted.

SUPER HASSLER fucked around with this message at Mar 4, 2013 around 03:12

Julio Cesar Fatass
Jul 24, 2007

"...."


The talk about Hopslam and other super IPAs aging really quickly has me curious as to how long an IPA can sit before it legitimately loses its hop and citrus character. Is there a rule of thumb?

Angry Grimace
Jul 29, 2010

HEY YEAH BARK AT THE MOON


then discard two cards at random


Julio Cesar Fatass posted:

The talk about Hopslam and other super IPAs aging really quickly has me curious as to how long an IPA can sit before it legitimately loses its hop and citrus character. Is there a rule of thumb?
The aroma will fade very quickly, like a couple of weeks. However, the taste doesn't usually fall off for a month or two. I once saw a guy on some beer sperging forum, probably BeerAdvocate, claim that 10 day old Pliny the Elder was too old and just a crappy, stale beer (which is obviously bullshit).

Good job on the OP, although I wish we could not classify PBR, Budweiser etc. as pilsners. It's a nerdy distinction, but I prefer the term "American adjunct lagers," which frankly describes what they are quite accurately since they have large proportions of corn/rice to reduce the body and taste to somewhere around nothing.

Angry Grimace fucked around with this message at Mar 2, 2012 around 21:35

nah
Mar 16, 2009



Lots of awful awful people on Ratebeer actually believe that Hopslam is total dogshit after a month.

Owithey
Aug 16, 2009


I have a question about the price of locally brewed beers in the US. I live in the UK and I don't think I've ever paid more than 20 for a bottle of beer, a nice Belgian abbey beer would probably set me back this much.

However recently I've been reading about beer trading and selling beers in the U.S. for upwards of $60. How long has this been happening? and am I missing out on some great new level of beers from the US, or is this similar to the locally brewed beers I can get here in the UK, only with a massive price tag?

I've always been happy with the variety of beers and styles a can get here and around Europe. Just with the incredible prices of the beers in the US, I feel like I'm missing out on something, please set my mind at rest.

lazerwolf
Dec 22, 2009

Orange and Black


Owithey posted:

I have a question about the price of locally brewed beers in the US. I live in the UK and I don't think I've ever paid more than 20 for a bottle of beer, a nice Belgian abbey beer would probably set me back this much.

However recently I've been reading about beer trading and selling beers in the U.S. for upwards of $60. How long has this been happening? and am I missing out on some great new level of beers from the US, or is this similar to the locally brewed beers I can get here in the UK, only with a massive price tag?

I've always been happy with the variety of beers and styles a can get here and around Europe. Just with the incredible prices of the beers in the US, I feel like I'm missing out on something, please set my mind at rest.

The most I've actually paid for a beer at a store was $23 for CCB/Bruery collaboration Marron Acidifie.

What you're probably referring to is the secondary ebay market which can get out of hand pricewise pretty quickly if a beer is deemed a 'whale'

Long story made short: No you're not missing out on anything. There are plenty of fair priced great American beers.

BoredByThis
Jul 13, 2001

Watch out! I'll attract you too!

The ridiculously priced beers in the States are usually artificially inflated due to scarcity and would rarely set you back more and $25US in a retail situation. The fact is that yes, there are some incredible things coming out of American breweries, but you can get just as many innovative and experimental beers from Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Italy, and tons of other places.

A lot of the beers that are fetching enormous fees on eBay are massive Russian Imperial Stouts or similarly large high ABV beers, some that have spent significant portions of their life in oak barrels of various types, and sometimes the brewers feel that they warrant a release day celebration. It's all very silly, really (though the release day festivities can be very fun).

Owithey
Aug 16, 2009


Well, that's good to hear at least. There are plenty of inventive beers around here and it's pretty easy to get the European beers as well. I just hope that trend isn't going towards beers with the same kind of pricing as wines, with a artificially inflated premium level of beer.

LeeMajors
Jan 20, 2005

Join the NRA, and help support the next generation of Olympic Champions!

Owithey posted:

Well, that's good to hear at least. There are plenty of inventive beers around here and it's pretty easy to get the European beers as well. I just hope that trend isn't going towards beers with the same kind of pricing as wines, with a artificially inflated premium level of beer.

The important thing to remember is that even though these expensive beers can be rare and special, there are unbelievable beers being brewed everywhere that are not being marketed into ridiculous scarcity and are nearly as good.

deadwing
Mar 5, 2007

My obligation to collecting is my only thirst

bananasinpajamas posted:

Lots of awful awful people on Ratebeer actually believe that Hopslam is total dogshit after a month.

I actually prefer Hopslam after a month, a bit of the upfront burn it has relaxes just a bit by then.

dumptruckzzz
Sep 13, 2010


Stella Artois is doing another free chalice giveaway thing, this was also posted in Coupons but there's enough glass talk in here that I figure someone would be interested. Bonus, this time they are CUSTOM ENGRAVED!! so you can actually have your gaudy Stella glass say "Stella Sucks" and feel less terrible about yourself.

Here's a link to the details. Basically just mail them a card with name, address, and age and I guess get a code in the mail from them to enter on the website.


For real beer talk, the Wegmans near me is still working through leftover Celebration Ale and told me they wouldn't get Bigfoot until that was all gone I think more than half their IPAs are at last 3 months old, and a ton of them are beyond the drink-by dates (if they have them). I might have to write in a complaint... again.

Mahoning
Feb 3, 2007


Cross posting this from the old thread since it is pretty stupid to keep discussions going over there:

Kudosx posted:

Yep! That's the latest release, let us know how you like it. I've heard good things...

Ya you guys have officially pre-hyped it (Maharajah) for me so I hope it lives up!

You know, I actually almost didn't find it (it wasn't amongst the other Avery beers, but thats because they actually keep it cold while the rest are warm) and was about to pick up another sixer of the Brew Kettle's White Rajah. I can't thank you enough for that recommendation, I REALLY enjoyed it and it is easily one of my top 3 beers now.

ShaneB
Oct 21, 2002



cool poo poo post tag

SUPER HASSLER
Jan 31, 2005



Totally just heard a dude at the bar say "horse blanket" when explaining Belgian sours to his girlfriend. I'd shake his hand, but it'd be embarrassing for both of us.

ShaneB posted:

cool poo poo post tag

This is the sort of thing that happens when the last post you made on SA was four years ago over on PI.

ShaneB
Oct 21, 2002



SUPER HASSLER posted:

Totally just heard a dude at the bar say "horse blanket" when explaining Belgian sours to his girlfriend. I'd shake his hand, but it'd be embarrassing for both of us.


This is the sort of thing that happens when the last post you made on SA was four years ago over on PI.

I'm just hatin'

lazerwolf
Dec 22, 2009

Orange and Black


SUPER HASSLER posted:

Totally just heard a dude at the bar say "horse blanket" when explaining Belgian sours to his girlfriend. I'd shake his hand, but it'd be embarrassing for both of us.


This is the sort of thing that happens when the last post you made on SA was four years ago over on PI.

Did you at least ask how the lacing was?

LeeMajors
Jan 20, 2005

Join the NRA, and help support the next generation of Olympic Champions!

lazerwolf posted:

Did you at least ask how the lacing was?

Is it quite as douchey to call it a sweaty taste? Because I do that and want to make sure its ok.

It's almost Collette season!

Docjowles
Apr 9, 2009



SUPER HASSLER posted:

Totally just heard a dude at the bar say "horse blanket" when explaining Belgian sours to his girlfriend. I'd shake his hand, but it'd be embarrassing for both of us.

True story: right before I ran into you at Funkwerks the assistant brewer was talking about Crooked Stave's stuff and described brett as contributing "barnyard" and "horse blanket" character

wattershed
Dec 27, 2002

Radio got his free iPod, did you get yours???

Docjowles posted:

True story: right before I ran into you at Funkwerks the assistant brewer was talking about Crooked Stave's stuff and described brett as contributing "barnyard" and "horse blanket" character

I, finally, will bite, and ask what I know a number of people want to ask but won't.

I didn't grow up on a farm or around a barn or stable or Mr. Hands. What the gently caress does a horse blanket smell like? And please don't say Band-Aids or something obtuse like that, give me something an ol' fashioned city boy would know.

RiggenBlaque
Jan 13, 2006

I think he's ready for a chair

wattershed posted:

I, finally, will bite, and ask what I know a number of people want to ask but won't.

I didn't grow up on a farm or around a barn or stable or Mr. Hands. What the gently caress does a horse blanket smell like? And please don't say Band-Aids or something obtuse like that, give me something an ol' fashioned city boy would know.

"Horse blanket" is a stupid loving term people made up. I can't really describe the actual smell since I'm very bad at these things, but go drink an Orval and then whenever you smell things that remind you of that beer, you'll be able to claim you detect horse blanket.

Arnold of Soissons
Mar 4, 2011

by XyloJW


RiggenBlaque posted:

"Horse blanket" is a stupid loving term people made up. I can't really describe the actual smell since I'm very bad at these things, but go drink an Orval and then whenever you smell things that remind you of that beer, you'll be able to claim you detect horse blanket.

When I first had an Orval (after reading Brewmaster's Table) I smelled it and immediately thought "ah, that's the horseblanket then, I can see that"

LeeMajors
Jan 20, 2005

Join the NRA, and help support the next generation of Olympic Champions!

Arnold of Soissons posted:

When I first had an Orval (after reading Brewmaster's Table) I smelled it and immediately thought "ah, that's the horseblanket then, I can see that"

Orval so delicious.

funkybottoms
Oct 28, 2010

Funky Bottoms is a land man

LeeMajors posted:

It's almost Collette season!

Great Divide pulled out of central VA last spring, but this is the first time it's really gonna bother me.

had some Soft Dookie on tap this afternoon, i think that's my favorite Evil Twin beer (although i'd love to try the Taji Stout on tap). maybe not the most complex stout, but so rich, creamy, and chocolaty that it's hard not to love.

Huge_Midget
Jun 6, 2002

I don't like the look of it...

Midwest beer goons, how many of you are planning on going to Dark Lord Day this year? So long as I get tickets, my wife, brother in law, father in law, and several friends and local homebrew club members are making the trek from Fort Wayne to Munster. Last year was awesome, and I hope the weather cooperates again this year. Anyone want to meet up and drink ridiculously awesome beer? I'd be down with trading, but if I am going to meetup with some other beer goons I say we break into our cellars and drink some ridiculous poo poo and make other people jealous. Here is my current cellar list I plan on bringing some bottle of Cantillon, Jolly Pumpkin, New Glarus, and some others that I need to open soon. I promise not to be a dick or spergelord, and drinking with goons is generally fun from past experience.

bartolimu
Nov 25, 2002



RiggenBlaque posted:

"Horse blanket" is a stupid loving term people made up.
It's an import from wine tasting, and a descriptive term that refers to a definite, unique aroma. Just because you're too citified to have ever smelled a horse doesn't mean it's dumb.

To me, horse blanket reminds me of new leather and fresh hay and maybe a bit of sweat. Unfortunately that's not going to help you city slickers much, sorry. It's a lot of things that shouldn't be pleasant to taste, but somehow beers with that aroma end up ambrosia-like. A lot of times I hear descriptors like "gym sock" used for probably the same smells. I've been lobbying my local tasting group in an attempt to bring "jock strap" into general parlance; thus far I've met with limited success.

Mr. Glass
May 1, 2009


Had DFH My Antonia last night. It was good, but not $16 good. Who prices these things?

Really I just wanted to say the poo poo post tag is a blight on my control panel

edit: oh it's fixed now

Sirotan
Oct 17, 2006

Sirotan is a seal.


College Slice

Huge_Midget posted:

Midwest beer goons, how many of you are planning on going to Dark Lord Day this year? So long as I get tickets, my wife, brother in law, father in law, and several friends and local homebrew club members are making the trek from Fort Wayne to Munster. Last year was awesome, and I hope the weather cooperates again this year. Anyone want to meet up and drink ridiculously awesome beer? I'd be down with trading, but if I am going to meetup with some other beer goons I say we break into our cellars and drink some ridiculous poo poo and make other people jealous. Here is my current cellar list I plan on bringing some bottle of Cantillon, Jolly Pumpkin, New Glarus, and some others that I need to open soon. I promise not to be a dick or spergelord, and drinking with goons is generally fun from past experience.

After a few years of contemplating, and plans falling through, I think this year I'm going to try to make the trek for DLD. On my one visit to 3 Floyds, I wasn't particularly impressed, but the beer trading/tasting aspect of the event has me really interested. Guess I should start planning on booking a hotel room and such....

deadwing
Mar 5, 2007

My obligation to collecting is my only thirst

Mr. Glass posted:

Had DFH My Antonia last night. It was good, but not $16 good. Who prices these things?

Really I just wanted to say the poo poo post tag is a blight on my control panel

edit: oh it's fixed now

16 sounds really expensive, did you have the Birra del Borgo version imported from Italy, or the DFH brewed version from the USA? The DFH version should retail at about 9 bucks a bottle, but the Birra del Borgo version isn't all that overpriced at 16.

zedprime
Jun 9, 2007


Horse blanket is more descriptively a spectrum of musk and leather. And really delicious. I prefer the term horse butt, really.

SUPER HASSLER posted:

It's an exciting time for beer fans, and if you're still a $2 PBR kind of person, now's the best time ever to start trying a few other things.
Just wanted to add if you're starting off as a PBR drinker you are already on the right track and obviously have good taste.

Mr. Glass
May 1, 2009


deadwing posted:

16 sounds really expensive, did you have the Birra del Borgo version imported from Italy, or the DFH brewed version from the USA? The DFH version should retail at about 9 bucks a bottle, but the Birra del Borgo version isn't all that overpriced at 16.

It was definitely the DFH version. I was driving back from DC with the wife and we stopped at a beer store in Maryland; I probably was a little bit at the selection even though the prices weren't all that great.

gently caress Pennsylvania

Gay Retard
Jun 7, 2003



SUPER HASSLER posted:

Totally just heard a dude at the bar say "horse blanket" when explaining Belgian sours to his girlfriend. I'd shake his hand, but it'd be embarrassing for both of us.


Does anybody else get a "cat urine" smell when drinking certain sours? I'm being 100% serious.


Huge_Midget posted:

Midwest beer goons, how many of you are planning on going to Dark Lord Day this year? So long as I get tickets, my wife, brother in law, father in law, and several friends and local homebrew club members are making the trek from Fort Wayne to Munster. Last year was awesome, and I hope the weather cooperates again this year. Anyone want to meet up and drink ridiculously awesome beer? I'd be down with trading, but if I am going to meetup with some other beer goons I say we break into our cellars and drink some ridiculous poo poo and make other people jealous. Here is my current cellar list I plan on bringing some bottle of Cantillon, Jolly Pumpkin, New Glarus, and some others that I need to open soon. I promise not to be a dick or spergelord, and drinking with goons is generally fun from past experience.

Assuming I can get tickets, I'm definitely going and I'd be more than happy to drink all your Cantillon and New Glarus.

Gay Retard fucked around with this message at Mar 3, 2012 around 03:49

withak
Jan 15, 2003
Probation
Can't post for 3 days!


Fun Shoe

Corbet posted:

Does anybody else get a "cat urine" smell when drinking certain sours? I'm being 100% serious.

Not impossible. Biochemistry can be pretty weird.

funkybottoms
Oct 28, 2010

Funky Bottoms is a land man

Corbet posted:

Does anybody else get a "cat urine" smell when drinking certain sours? I'm being 100% serious.

something my girlfriend was drinking the other day smelled remarkably like cat piss, but i didn't say anything because she was enjoying it. can't remember what it was; i wasn't interested in drinking it, myself.

dumptruckzzz
Sep 13, 2010


Corbet posted:

Does anybody else get a "cat urine" smell when drinking certain sours? I'm being 100% serious.

I definitely get cat urine whenever I drink something that's got Simcoe hops in it, I think that might be common though cause one of my friends who doesn't drink much beer but has had cats all his life picked it out pretty instantly.

consensual poster
Sep 1, 2009



dumptruckzzz posted:

I definitely get cat urine whenever I drink something that's got Simcoe hops in it, I think that might be common though cause one of my friends who doesn't drink much beer but has had cats all his life picked it out pretty instantly.

Yeah, I definitely get the cat piss aroma from beers heavy on the Simcoe hops. I think it's one of those things that only some people are sensitive to, like Summit hops smelling like green onions, or amarillo hops tasting like aspirin.

I haven't gotten cat piss from a sour beer before, though. Lots of other nasty stuff, but not that.

Darth Goku Jr
Oct 19, 2004

yes yes i see, i understand


I was way too happy to finally get my hands on a six pack of Sam Adam's Noble Pils. For all the talk RIS, and IIPA/DIPA/whateverIPA, and Sours get (rightfully so I guess), there is beauty in a well made Pilsner. Now, I just need to get to Plzen.

Kudosx
Jun 6, 2006

it's raining zerglings!


Perfectly Cromulent posted:

Yeah, I definitely get the cat piss aroma from beers heavy on the Simcoe hops. I think it's one of those things that only some people are sensitive to, like Summit hops smelling like green onions, or amarillo hops tasting like aspirin.

Citra hops can also give off a cat urine smell. I tried an experimental IPA from Thirsty Dog that wasn't ready for the public because they're still fussing with the recipe, and it smelled 100% like cat piss.

It tasted pretty good, but the smell was rather off-putting.

Kraven Moorhed
Jan 5, 2006

So wrong, yet so right.

Soiled Meat

funkybottoms posted:

something my girlfriend was drinking the other day smelled remarkably like cat piss, but i didn't say anything because she was enjoying it. can't remember what it was; i wasn't interested in drinking it, myself.

I had a beer once that smelled like dog biscuits, so that's certainly not out of the question. Also, never buy this poo poo. Please.

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Quiet Feet
Dec 14, 2009

THE HELL IS WITH THIS ASS!?


Darth Goku Jr posted:

I was way too happy to finally get my hands on a six pack of Sam Adam's Noble Pils. For all the talk RIS, and IIPA/DIPA/whateverIPA, and Sours get (rightfully so I guess), there is beauty in a well made Pilsner. Now, I just need to get to Plzen.

Is that out again? I thought they discontinued it for Alpine Spring, which is actually really good but pissed me off because I had Noble Pils all of once and kept missing it since spring is apparently late January through mid-march now.

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