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MrFurious
Dec 11, 2003
THINKS HE IS BEST AT DOGS (is actually worst at dogs!!!)





to the New and Improved Pet Island Puppy Thread. Please take 30 seconds to review the thread rules and the post outline below. The outline will help you quickly find answers to specific questions in many cases, or at least allow you to frame your question in an appropriate context. Instant Jellyfish and I have spent a number of weeks planning and writing this thread so I hope you will all find it informative and helpful. I’d also like to say thank you to the other individuals who contributed.



Please remember, no one (with few exceptions) posting in this thread is a vet, and the few that are will NOT be giving you formal veterinary advice on your pet online. This means that everything said should not be construed as professional or veterinary advice, but rather the words of some dog nerds on the internet. If you are in doubt or are concerned about your pet, please seek professional help from a licensed veterinarian or behaviorist.



There are only three very basic rules for the thread, and they are very easy to follow, so it should not be hard to keep them in mind as you post. Khelmar and Bamzilla have read and approved these rules and stated that violations will result in bans. You have been warned.

  1. This thread is for puppy problems and new owner problems
    This means that if your question revolves around a dog under the age of two, post away. Likewise, if you just adopted a shelter dog and are having issues with housetraining, you’re in the right place. If your 6 year old basset hound is having problems with his down-stays, that really belongs in the training thread.

  2. Take the ethical discussions elsewhere
    In Europe, crate training is illegal and frowned upon because of the association of crates and puppy mills. Some people believe that Cesar Milan is the Anti-Christ. The point is, we don’t care. Ethical debates are outside of the scope of this thread and if you are determined to have them, please do so in a separate thread.

  3. Refrain from bad posting
    Please don’t crap up this thread, we’ve worked very hard on it. Before you hit the reply button, ask yourself:
    1. "Have I given a cursory read through the original post to see if my question has already been answered?"
    2. “Am I answering a question that someone has asked in a manner that is well-thought out, coherent and complete?”
    3. “Does my post offer something more than a rehashing of what others have already said?”
    4. “Am I engaging in a trite and pointless argument with someone over things that are outside the scope of this thread?”

pre:
I.   Introduction
    a.  Welcome
    b.  Disclaimer
    c.  Thread Rules

II.  Are you ready for a puppy?
    a.  Lifestyle & Relationship Status
    b.  Household
    c.  Other Pets
    d.  Costs

III. Finding Your Puppy
    a.  Breeders vs. Adoption
    b.  Finding and vetting a good breeder
    c.  Finding and vetting a good shelter or rescue organization
    d.  Things to specifically avoid when finding your dog

IV.  Choosing Your Puppy					
    a.  Matching a breed to your lifestyle
    b.  Volhardt Aptitude Test

V.   Before You Get Your Puppy			
    a.  Picking out a crate
    b.  Appropriate Puppy Toys
    c.  Training Tools
    d.  Dog Food
       i.  Foods/Items to Avoid & Common Poisons
       ii. Choosing a Food
    e.  Home References & Books You’ll Want
    f.  Picking out a veterinarian and a trainer

VI.  First Weeks at Home					
    a.  Crate Training
    b.  Playtime
    c.  The Basic Tricks
       i.   Name Game
       ii.  Sit
       iii. Down

VII. First Two Months at Home
    a.  Socialization & Puppy Kindergarten
    b.  Vaccinations
    c.  Spaying & Neutering

VIII. Common Problems
    a.  Housetraining
    b.  Mouthing/Biting
    c.  Inappropriate Chewing
    d.  Diseases/Parasites
    e.  The Multi-dog Household
GoogleDocs Version of this Thread

MrFurious fucked around with this message at 02:34 on Mar 14, 2012

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MrFurious
Dec 11, 2003
THINKS HE IS BEST AT DOGS (is actually worst at dogs!!!)


Before you get a puppy, you should consider very carefully whether, firstly, a dog of any kind is appropriate for your situation, and secondly, if you are truly prepared to handle a puppy. As an owner, you have a responsibility to care for your animal and make sure that its needs are met. Each of us approaches this differently, but we have tried to assemble a basic checklist to establish if your situation can accommodate a puppy. If your situation doesn’t lend itself to a puppy, you should consider adopting an older dog from your local shelter.



Puppies require a great deal of supervision. This can be overwhelming for a single person to take on, unless they have a lifestyle that lends themselves to being available for the majority of every day.

If you work a standard 9 to 5 job, or anything that resembles it, this is very, very unlikely to be you. Lots of people think that they can come home on their lunch break to let the dog out to go to the bathroom. If this describes your situation, chances are high that you do not have the time to dedicate to a puppy. Unless you are willing to pay for doggy day-care or a daily dog-walker, you should reconsider getting a dog. Leaving the dog out in the back yard all day while you are gone is not a responsible solution.

If, instead, you are a college student, you may have gobs of time on your hands, but a puppy is still a poor choice for you at this point in your life. In a few short years, your life will be upended as you move on to a career. This can be a very stressful time for you as an individual so just imagine what it can do to your dog.

Couples with a long, stable relationship can be fine, but in the event that you are not married, it is imperative that one of you be the primary owner/caretaker and that the necessary registration records reflect this. I personally know breeders that will not sell to unmarried couples simply because of the obvious concern over long term stability for the dog.

Military personnel should also consider their lifestyle. If you work long or rotating shifts, that is additional stress on the dog when you are not away, in addition to more time he has to wait to be let outside or be fed. New orders come every few years, which can easily be a cross-country move, or worse. Travelling with the dog is often difficult for both of you, and can be extremely expensive. Worse, if you’re being stationed overseas, you’ll frequently have to complete quarantine procedures for the animal. The details of this vary from place to place, but it can range from staying at home with you and avoiding all other animals for 6 weeks to being placed at a shelter for up to 6 months.



You also need to consider your living arrangement. Obviously, the ideal situation would be with a married couple who own their own home, but it isn’t essential.
Here are some dangers to watch out for:

Roommates
If you live in a situation with roommates, a puppy is a poor choice for you. People have been known to make it work, but it tends to be difficult for everyone. Sit down and ask yourself if you really trust your roommates to be alone with your new family member. If these individuals are responsible adults, everything could be gravy. If your roommates are college students who are regularly taking bonghits and throwing parties, these are not good housemates for your puppy, and it’s just a matter of time until something unfortunate happens.

Apartments
Apartment living with dogs is possible -- I currently do it. But it is not ideal. Bear in mind that your new friend, especially if he or she is a puppy, will do damage to the property, whether that means tearing up the carpet, the walls, or the cabinetry. You will be held financially responsible for these damages.

Also, apartments frequently have breed restrictions, so make sure that you check into this with your landlord and understand the rules. Attempting to cheat the rules can get you evicted.

Lastly, bear in mind that apartment neighbors are closer to you than neighbors in a home, so you are more likely to have noise or other complaints about your dog, or neighbors that constantly disturb your dog while you aren’t home, leading to problems such as separation anxiety.



The other cohabitants of your home need to be taken into account as well. If you have 3 cats already that don’t get along well with dogs, a puppy is going to cause a great deal of strife at home and isn’t fair to your other pets. Likewise, keep in mind that young children can be rough on animals. A rambunctious toddler can terrorize a young puppy and cause a great deal of behavioral trauma that may become a lifelong problem.



Dog ownership is expensive. I have seen estimated yearly costs of ownership ranging from $200 to $500 and I personally believe these to be very low. These costs vary with the level of care you are going to provide as well as the source of your puppy. A shelter adoption can be as low as $50 for the animal, whereas a well-bred puppy can easily cost you $1500. That doesn’t even include the first year vet costs, toys and other necessary items you’ll have to purchase.

When my wife and I adopted our puppy two years ago, we put together a detailed budget to cover all the items we expected to buy in the first year and all of the yearly recurring costs. We ended up being very, very close to our budgeted numbers. Our budget predicted that first year costs would be roughly $4500 and yearly costs thereafter would be roughly $1500. Ask yourself very, very seriously if you can afford to take on a pet. Sacrifices can always be made, but that doesn’t mean it is the wise decision to make.

Lastly, if you are looking to save costs on ownership, an easy place to do so is on dog food -- that doesn’t make it right. You shouldn’t feed your dog the cheapest quality kibble for the same reason that you shouldn’t be eating every meal at Taco Bell.

Additional sources:
http://www.aspca.org/adoption/pet-care-costs.aspx
http://www.akc.org/pdfs/press_cente...g_ownership.pdf

MrFurious
Dec 11, 2003
THINKS HE IS BEST AT DOGS (is actually worst at dogs!!!)





If you have decided a puppy is going to be totally worth the lack of sleep and destruction of personal property, you now get to start the process of choosing your new addition. This dog is going to be a part of your family for the next 10+ years so it is in your own best interest to put a lot of thought into where you acquire your puppy. While the little cockashipoo in the pet store window looks tragically adorable there is a good chance it will bring you nothing but heartbreak and financial woes in the long run. The best places to find your future puppy are at an animal shelter, rescue, or responsible breeder depending on your needs and desires.

Despite common perceptions, PI loves it when people buy puppies from breeders as long as the breeder is responsible. If you have very specific requirements for a puppy, want to be certain of a puppy’s background, are dead set on a breed that is uncommon or may not have an appropriate temperament if from an uncertain source, can wait for a litter to be bred that suits your needs and are willing to spend more (think up to $2,000+ for some breeds), then a good breeder might be for you.

If you are more flexible in your requirements and mostly just want a good family dog then look into a rescue or shelter. It’s cheaper, often comes with some veterinary care, there are always puppies available somewhere, and you get the warm fuzzy feeling of saving a life. Shelters and rescues even occasionally have purebred puppies available if that is something that is important to you, especially for common breeds such as labs, hounds, chihuahuas etc depending on your area.



If you’ve decided that a puppy from a breeder is just what you need, you need to take the time to go find one. A good place to start is googling [breed] club of [country/region/state]. Many breed clubs have lists of breeders that ascribe to a certain code of ethics or have individuals who have volunteered to help potential puppy buyers find breeders in their area. Just remember that being AKC/CKC/UKC etc registered means nothing about the quality of the dog so you will need to look closely at any breeder recommended. Many people in PI love nitpicking breeder websites so feel free to post and ask us our opinions. Just be willing to listen to what we might have to say.

Another good way to find a breeder is to attend shows or working competitions that feature the breed of your choosing. This is especially true if you are looking for a puppy from working lines or you are hoping to become active in a particular sport with your future puppy. While you are there talk to the participants, get to know the lines that are common in that event, and ask for breeder recommendations when you have a good idea of what you want. Volunteering for events is a great way to begin to get involved in a breed community and be sure that that breed is going to fit in to your lifestyle.

Once you think you’ve found a good breeder you’re going to want to ask them a bunch of questions. Breeders are notoriously bad at the internet so don’t be surprised if they want you to call or meet in person instead of going through email. A good breeder is going to be judging you just as much as you are judging them so be prepared to do a lot of talking before a puppy even comes in to the picture. Also keep in mind that a breeder may suggest that a specific breed is not suited to your lifestyle. Understand that they have a lot of passion towards a breed and want the best for both you and their puppies.

Here are some questions you may want to bring up when you think you have found a good breeder:
  • What genetic testing has been done on the parents?
    • What are the results and can I look at them?
    • What about the grandparents and siblings of the parents?
    • Many breeders post results of genetic testing on OFFA.org or similar breed specific databases, making it really easy for you to verify them.
  • What activities do you participate in with your dogs?
    • What titles do they have?
  • What are the personalities of the parents?
  • How do you think the parents complement each other?
  • How many litters do you generally have a year?
  • What socialization and training do you do before the puppies go to their new homes?
  • Are you willing to be available for questions throughout the puppy’s life?
  • What happens if I can no longer care for the puppy?
  • What made you decide to do this breeding? What do you hope these puppies will bring to the breed?
  • What quirks does this breed have?
  • What do you feel more people should know about the breed?
  • Can you give me references from other people who have bought puppies from you?
If all of their answers sound good make sure you get a look at their puppy contract before putting down a deposit. Make sure that their health guarantee, spay/neuter requirements, and anything else they may ask you to agree with aligns with your personal values. Be wary of breeders that require that you feed a specific brand of food or specific vitamin that has to be purchased through them.

If a breeder will not allow you to meet the dogs in their possession or see their breeding environment, alarm bells should be clanging in your brain. Additionally, a good breeder will only send home a puppy between the ages of 8-16 weeks. If the breeder is focused on doing their own socialization for their puppies, this will change to 12-16 weeks, but this is both rare and, in general, the sign of a good breeder.



If you’ve decided to rescue a puppy, good for you! There are a number of different options for adoption to consider.
  • Animal Shelters/Dog wardens/Federally funded rescues
  • Private Rescues
  • Breed Specific rescues

Animal Shelters
When you adopt from a shelter you may not have any background on the puppy, especially if it is brought in without a mother. You may not know what its personality is going to be, or what size it is going to grow to, or what early experiences it might have had before it got to the shelter. It may need to be neutered/spayed and vaccinated before it is released to you no matter how young or you may just give someone your cash and get a puppy in return. It all depends on the facility. A puppy from the shelter may be more likely to have an undiagnosed illness than one that has been in a foster home so you should take it in for a vet check within 24-48 hours of adopting it (this is a good idea and often a requirement no matter where you may get a puppy). Those might all seem like big giant cons against adopting a pound puppy, but the pro is that you are honestly saving a life. Even puppies are at risk of getting put down at many shelters due to crowding or easily treatable illness.

Be aware that just because a shelter claims a “No-Kill” policy does not automatically make it a good shelter or resource for pets, care or information. In some cases, this policy prevents them from euthanizing terminal animals such as the cat that was run over by a car and has no chance to survive. Instead he will spend hours in pain before he slowly dies. Shelters who euthanize and are staffed by good volunteers and employees are that much more motivated to adopt healthy animals into good homes.

Private All-breed rescues
Private rescues are less likely to put down puppies in most circumstances and many use foster homes to get to know the personality of the pups before they adopt them out. They generally have received vet care and are less likely to have an undiagnosed communicable illness like kennel cough. A rescue may have more information about the puppy’s background but may have just picked them up from a shelter to give them a better chance. If you live somewhere with strict breed or size restrictions a puppy from a shelter or rescue may not be the best choice for you as there is no guarantee that the little puppy will grow up to fit those restrictions. There is a big difference between an Australian shepherd, a Catahoula leopard dog, and a Chihuahua as adults but they all might look like a little blue puppy potato at 8 weeks. If you have size or breed restrictions you may want to look for an older pup so you have a better idea of what they will look like as an adult. Puppy adoption fees from rescues may be higher than those of older dogs but those funds generally go directly to helping more dogs in need.

Breed Specific Rescues
Breed specific rescues are a good option if you have requirements or limitations in what breed or size of dog you can have but still want to rescue. They are a lot less likely to have very young puppies available, but may have young dogs that have hit the age of being a butthead or have worn out their cuteness. With a breed specific rescue you may have a higher adoption fee and a more rigorous application process but you are much more likely to get a dog that fits specific needs such as size, shedding, and temperament.

Red Flag Indicators
Some rescues are actually a front for backyard breeders or puppymills. Here are some red flags that may indicate that a rescue is not what it seems.
  • Has frequent litters of rare or desirable dogs available
  • Has no application
  • Is willing to adopt out a dog as a gift for someone else
  • Dogs have not received any vet care prior to adoption
  • Dogs are released without being neutered or having a signed neuter contract
  • Are not willing to take the dog back if things do not work out
  • Does not let you see the facilities where the dogs live
  • Has an exorbitant adoption fee
None of these things guarantee that a rescue is a scam but they should make you take a closer look before adopting a puppy from them.



Puppy mills and pet stores
Puppy Mills or Puppy Farms are prevalent throughout the world. Here dogs are housed and treated like livestock and puppies are sold to anyone who will produce the cash. They may sell puppies directly to consumers either on property or through websites or they may wholesale puppies to brokers who provide them to pet stores. Puppy mills may be advertised as USDA inspected, this merely means they have met minimum health standards such housing dogs in cages at least 6 inches larger than the dog itself, not keeping more than 12 dogs in one cage, and feeding the dogs at least once a day. This is only for breeding facilities and not for brokering facilities, direct to consumer facilities, or pet shops. Pet stores are generally unregulated or minimally regulated. Even when a facility is inspected it does not need to pass inspection in order to keep its kennel license and regulations have generally been found to be ineffective.

Pet stores will frequently advertise that they get their puppies from good, local breeders but the vast majority of pet store puppies come from mills either directly or through a broker or auction. No good breeder who does health testing and breeds to improve their chosen breed would choose to sell their beloved puppies to strangers in pet stores. Since the puppies in a pet store are not from good breeders they may have expensive genetic problems, poor temperaments, a lack of any sort of positive socialization, contagious diseases, and the potential for short, tragic lives.

While you may feel like you are saving a dog’s life by purchasing it from a pet store or puppy mill you are actually giving the industry more money to continue. While that particular puppy may now have a new home, he will be replaced by another and his mother will continue to be bred to death until there is no more market for pet store puppies. While it may be heartbreaking to leave a puppy to an uncertain future it is the only way to stop the industry as a whole.

PetSmart and PetCo
These two chains don’t fit into the above category. To my knowledge, they never sell puppies or dogs in the store, but they will frequently have “Adoption Days” in which a local rescue or shelter will bring in volunteers and animals in an effort to rehome them. Do some research on the organization the animals are coming from, but we consider this a Good Thing.

For more information look at:
http://www.pupquest.org
http://www.prisonersofgreed.org
http://www.petshoppuppies.org

To report a suspected puppy mill, contact: 1-877-MILL-TIP or go to http://www.humanesociety.org/forms/...puppy_mill.html

BackYard Breeders
BYBs are generally not the depressing hellholes that puppy mills are. They usually are just John Q Public down the street who had an unfixed bitch and decided she should have a litter to “settle her down”. They may be breeding Fluffums because she’s just so friendly and everyone wants one of her puppies. They may feel like those snobby show breeders are too expensive and just want to provide cheap family pets to honest, hardworking folks. The problem is when they do not do appropriate health testing and are not familiar with their dog’s lines and history. A checkup at the vet will not clear a lab for hip dysplasia or a boxer for thyroid disorder or a dalmatian from unilateral deafness. Even if they have had the forethought to get their bitch tested they may not know about their dog’s grandfather who died at 4 of cancer or that all of her siblings had to be put down for biting people. This means that you don’t know what genetic problems your new pup may end up with, either physical or behavioral. Purchasing a pup from a BYB may also encourage them to continue to breed because they made money the first time.

MrFurious
Dec 11, 2003
THINKS HE IS BEST AT DOGS (is actually worst at dogs!!!)





Let’s be honest, we all are drawn to certain breeds that we find aesthetically attractive. I’m not going to suggest that you shouldn’t be doing this, but I will strongly urge you to be realistic about your expectations. If your ideal buddy is a couch potato, do not even consider an Australian Shepherd or a Border Collie.

When you accept guardianship of a puppy, realize what sort of dog that puppy is going to become and do your research. Understand the breed and what sort of situation you are getting into for the next 10-15 years. It’s very important that you do not delude yourself about what you can handle, because if you get a puppy that is more than you can handle, there are a limited number of outcomes, and none of them are good. None of us want to contribute to shelter overcrowding, so do your homework first.

At a bare minimum, you need to understand the following requirements for any breed that you consider:
  • Health Problems (Hip dysplasia, epilepsy, cataracts)
  • Average lifespan
  • Energy/Exercise Requirements (daily)
  • Grooming requirements
  • Adult Size
  • Breed restrictions in your area
There are a variety of resources that can assist you in breed research, and I’ve provided a few below to get prospective owners started, but these are by no means comprehensive.

http://animal.discovery.com/breed-s...dog-breeds.html
http://www.akc.org/breeds/index.cfm?nav_area=breeds
http://www.fci.be/nomenclature.aspx
http://www.purina.com/dog/breed-selector/default.aspx
http://www.embracepetinsurance.com/...dog-breeds.aspx



One of the factors that’s going to play heavily into your puppy selection, whether from a breeder or a shelter/rescue, is temperament. You, as an owner, will have certain expectations of what sort of dog you’re looking for. One way to test and examine temperament at this age is called the Volhard Puppy Aptitude Test.

The Volhard Puppy Aptitude Test (PAT) puts the puppy in a variety of situations and gauges its response to certain stimuli. Based upon the scoring provided, you can get a rough idea of the temperament of this puppy. In the past it has been generally accepted that this temperament will roughly correlate to behavior as an adult, but that has been called into question more recently in a few studies, as well as by Jean Donaldson in her book “The Culture Clash.” Our non-expert advice is that the PAT can likely give you a good idea of what type of puppy you will get for the next 6-8 months, but should not be relied upon for long-term or adult temperament. Too many other factors play a role in that mix, especially training and environment.

You can read more about the PAT here:
http://www.volhard.com/pages/pat.php

MrFurious fucked around with this message at 22:06 on Mar 11, 2012

MrFurious
Dec 11, 2003
THINKS HE IS BEST AT DOGS (is actually worst at dogs!!!)



Before you bring home your dog, there are some basic preparatory steps you need to take to make your home safe and make the transition for the animal as smooth and comfortable as possible. This includes things like puppy toys, a crate, wall socket protectors, cord protectors, puppy food, collars, tags, leashes, a clicker and training books. It is assumed at this point that the prospective puppy owner has taken a good, hard look at his or her lifestyle and finances and decided that yes, he or she really can afford this.



The details of crate training will be covered later in this post, but we’ll discuss puppy crates themselves here. Crates come in all shapes and sizes, and you will likely end up with several over the course of your dog’s life, but for a puppy you want a wire crate with a divider and a flat bottom so that you can ration the appropriate amount of space for crate time during house training. Additionally, the wire crate allows the dog to see their environment if necessary, and you can always drape a blanket over it if you want them to quiet down and take a nap.

You can find an example of a crate like this here. They come from a variety of different manufacturers, so do some homework and find one that is both affordable and sturdy, but be prepared to pay between $50-$150 for a decent crate.

You may also wish to consider a bed liner if you’re concerned about the dog getting cold -- these can complicate early house training, however, so if you don’t need it, don’t get it.



You’ll also need a plethora of entertainment tools for the young puppy. You can spend as little or as much on this as you like, but below are some recommendations for the first six months. Be careful with going overboard though, because it can confuse your puppy about what is and is not a toy.

Puppy Nylabone
This is a good, durable chew and gnaw toy for them to work their jaws and gums and through the teething phase.

Puppy Kong
Another good, soft chew for puppies. Make sure you get the puppy variety until they have their adult teeth in, as the regular Kongs are not recommended for puppies.

Kong Wobbler
This is a great device to feed your puppy meals out of. They have to work at it and think, so it exercises their bodies and their minds while you chill out and enjoy your coffee. Highly recommended.

Rubber Balls (Ex1, Ex2)
Dogs love balls. They engage their prey drive and can be a blast for them to play with. Consider ones that will fit the Chuckit! launchers or ones with squeakers inside. Avoid tennis balls because they fall apart easily and the fiber thread can damage gums and become a choking hazard.



  • Basic Buckle Collar -- If possible, you want to get a buckle collar that will grow with the dog. Adjustable collars tend to slip and before you know it they are way too loose.

  • 6 foot lead -- Get a basic, 6 foot nylon leash from any pet store on the planet. Avoid any sort of retractable lead. These make it harder for the dog to learn to walk on a loose leash because the length of the leash is always changing, and it’s always taut. They are also prone to breaking at inopportune times.

  • Hands-free leash -- Look into a hands-free waist leash as these can make training and walks much more enjoyable for everyone.

  • Bait/Treat Bag -- A good bait bag that will clip onto your belt or the above hands-free leash is also incredibly useful as a training tool. Treats are accessed quickly and easily for shaping behaviors. I personally have a Premier bait bag and love it, but some folks have had issues with them. Mine has worked flawlessly for nearly two years now.
Misc. Tools & Toys
You’ll spend tons of money on good ideas that won’t work out, but here’s a link (NOTE: Requires subscription to Whole Dog Journal -- just get one already) that includes a list of things that you may not have thought of. Not all of these are truly required or needed, but many of them can be extremely convenient and are at least worth your consideration.



Foods/Items to Avoid & Common Poisons
There are a multitude of everyday items that surround us that are toxic to dogs, and their toxicity ranges from mild stomachache to complete renal failure within days or weeks. Everyday foods for you can literally kill your dog.These items may surprise you as well -- for example, some dogs have an unpredictable reaction to grapes or raisins that results in death. You should be cautious what items are around your household and in reach of your dog, just as if you had a toddler (with sharper teeth).

You can find more information about toxic items here:
http://www.aspca.org/Pet-care/poison-control/Plants/
http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/poiso...ople-foods.aspx

Choosing a Food
Choosing a puppy food for your growing little buddy can be intimidating as there are a ton of different brands, and within each brand there are another dozen varieties each with confusing names. Here are the basics that you need to know - puppies require additional protein as they grow during the early months. Additionally, the food labeling industry is absolutely rife with misinformation, smoke and mirrors. You have a few resources at your disposal to handle this, and here are two of my favorites:
The Pet Island Nutrition Thread
Dogfoodadvisor.com

Find a food that:
  • You can afford
  • Isn’t chock full of fluff or fillers
  • Is labelled as formulated to the AAFCO standard for growth for all life stages
There is currently a fad regarding homemade diets such as BARF. While we all want healthy animals and to provide the best care for them that we can, it is very important to remember that an unbalanced diet can result in horrible problems for your dog as it ages. It is strongly recommended that you consult a veterinary nutritionist if you are considering a homemade diet.



There’s more information than we could possibly put in this thread that is all useful and helpful, but even if we did, you wouldn’t remember it anyways. Books can help you here, and some of them are even free.

To start, I recommend a Home Veterinary Reference. This is fantastic for the 3am panic attacks that you have because your dog threw up a tennis ball, appears to be painting your walls with poop, or whatever other nightmare situation you can invent. A home vet reference can help you decide whether you need to call the Emergency Vet and pay the minimum fee just to be seen, which is usually not something to sneeze at.

I personally use this one and have been very happy with it, but you should shop around and take a look at other options and make a decision for yourself.

Ian Dunbar, founder of the Association of Pet Dog Trainers (APDT), has released two short books for new puppy owners totally free for download because he is an amazing individual. I highly recommend that you download them and check them out. He is my personal favorite among the huge cast of dog experts out there today.

Ian Dunbar’s Before You Get Your Puppy
Ian Dunbar’s After You Get Your Puppy



This can be one of the most nerve-wracking experiences for a new dog owner. All practicing veterinarians have gone to veterinary school and have degrees, but they are most certainly not all created equal. Having had to go through this all over again recently, I hope my experience can assist some of you out there and make your lives that much easier.

What to look for in a veterinarian
You’re actually searching for two things - both a veterinary clinic and an individual veterinarian. Keep in mind that your standard vet won’t always be available, so it may be wise to get comfortable with the idea of seeing someone else. There is a professional association for veterinary hospitals and clinics known as the American Animal Hospital Association or AAHA. Membership is not mandatory or regulated, and is not necessarily an indicator of quality of care at a facility. The clinic I am currently using is not an AAHA member and I still think they have some of the best vets I have ever met.

In short, my list of qualifications for a new vet are:
  • Is happy to answer questions I have about treatment options or my animal, time permitting, without hesitation
  • Participates in continuing education seminars to stay up to date in their field
  • Has a tolerably pleasant demeanor
  • Demonstrates that he/she cares about the health and comfort of my animal
  • Has a staff that is friendly and eager to assist -- from the vet technicians to the people who answer the phones and make appointments
  • Is an individual whose opinion I am confident I can trust, even when he or she is telling me things I do not want to hear
These may seem like no-brainers, but it is helpful to keep them all in mind when shopping around. Remember that you and your chosen vet are the only voices your dog has. Bear in mind, however, that “bedside manner” in a veterinarian does not necessarily correlate to quality care -- do your homework and decide whether this individual is qualified to give you professional medical advice about your pet. Look at past client history and experience, continuing education credentials and credits, the institution their degree came from and talk to other clients.

What to look for in a dog trainer
Picking out a good dog trainer can easily be as frustrating as the above, depending upon where you live. In an effort to keep this short and sweet, here are a list of Do’s and Don’ts for picking out a trainer.

Your trainer should NEVER:
  • Hit or strike a dog in the class, including his or her own animal
  • Yell, scream at or deride class participants or their dogs
  • Leash jerk or make any corrections via collar, regardless of the type of collar
  • Promote the use of choke chains, prong/e-collars or allow them to be used in class

Your perfect trainer should:
  • Start classes on time and arrive at class punctually
  • Have indoor classes in an area that is clean, safe, and free from distractions
  • Be a certified trainer from a well respected training program such as CPDT or KPA
  • Be able to demonstrate the behaviors in class with their own animals
  • Be a member of additional organizations such as the APDT and participate in continuing education courses and events
  • Be active in your local community as a Dog People.

You can search for KPA and CPDT trainers via their appropriate websites below:
CCPDT Trainer Search
KPA Trainer Search

If you do not find a suitable trainer at the links above, you can also search on the APDT website, however, bear in mind that APDT membership has two different levels -- Standard and Professional Members. Professional Members MUST have a certification such as CCPDT, ACAAB, KPA, etc, while Standard Members simply pay membership fees annually and have no certifications. The APDT Trainer Search can be found here:
APDT Trainer Search

Find a Behaviorist in your area below:
Vet Behaviorist: http://www.dacvb.org/resources/find/
IAABC: http://iaabc.org/consultants

MrFurious fucked around with this message at 03:56 on Nov 19, 2012

MrFurious
Dec 11, 2003
THINKS HE IS BEST AT DOGS (is actually worst at dogs!!!)





The crate is your puppy’s room. It’s his safe place, his bedroom, and, provided you structure the environment appropriately, a Good Place To Be. The articles and resources referenced previously can give you more details on why crate training works and how it relates to a dog’s environment, but we’re going to focus on when and how you should be crating during the first couple of weeks.

How Do I Crate Train?
The first hurdle is to make the crate a fun place and to classically condition a positive emotional response for the dog when he’s crated. Once the crate is set up and sized for the puppy, introduce him to the crate. Bring a bag of yummy treats with you. If the dog sniffs the crate, treat immediately. If and when he places a paw inside the crate, produce several rewards in quick succession. If the dog is hesitant to enter the crate, place a treat just inside the crate (start with less than an inch), and progressively increase the distance into the crate. The goal is to have the dog voluntarily entering the crate. Repeat this exercise multiple times a day throughout the first weeks you have your dog to build a strong conditioned response.

If you feel that you need an extra reinforcer, try feeding meals in the crate. You can also provide special treat times during the day in the crate -- a popular example is a Puppy Kong filled with kibble and peanut butter. Put it in the freezer first to minimize the mess and make it more difficult to devour.

When do I crate my puppy?
The question of when to crate is fairly straight forward. During the first weeks, your puppy will be spending a great deal of time playing, pooping and sleeping, and not always in that order. Play sessions, described below, should be short, and when it’s time for a nap afterwards, make it happen in the crate. If you are cooking and can’t pay attention to the dog -- crate. If you are running to the store for less than 5 minutes -- crate. If you are running out to the back yard to do some chores and aren’t taking the dog with you -- crate.

When crate training, remember to NEVER
  • Force the dog into the crate
  • Use the crate as a timeout or punishment
  • Let the dog out while it is whining (wait for 10-15 seconds of silence first)



Puppies love to play, and playing with puppies is fun. It’s a healthy and enjoyable way to build a strong bond with your puppy and, more importantly, to exhaust them so they don’t spend their idle moments chewing holes in everything around them. There are lots of fun games to play with puppies -- hide and seek, find the toy, and tug are all excellent examples that you can both pick up quickly.

Remember to keep play sessions short with young puppies. Although they have seemingly boundless reserves of energy, they need regular naps, and it’s your job to enforce them. After a 15-30 minute play session, make sure you take the dog out for a bathroom break and then put them down for a short nap.



Below are a few easy tricks to get you started on the right foot, training wise. Each of these tricks will require treats and a clicker. If these items and methodologies are new to you, please refer to the training thread. Make sure that you have “charged” the clicker before you begin. If you are interested in training more advanced tricks, it is strongly recommended that you spend some time reading the training thread and some of the books recommended within. The tricks described below are very basic and introductory in nature, but will also expose you to some of the techniques used for more advanced training.


The Name Game
The Name Game is an effective way of teaching your new family member his or her name. The desired behavior is to have the dog stop and look at you when you say his or her name, although some people also prefer to have an implied “come” command as well. This is up to the owner, but I recommend that you start simple.

Training this behavior works best if you have two people, each with a clicker and treats. When the dog is looking away from an individual, that individual should say the dog’s name. If the dog turns in your direction at all, even a tiny bit, click and treat. The dog will then likely be focused on that first individual like a laser. That’s when the other person repeats the exercise. Ping pong the dog between the two individuals, gradually requiring more and more focus for the click and treat.

If you can complete the training above, then congratulations, you have just shaped your first behavior. Shaping is one of the harder methods to train, but it generally results in more consistent results -- provided that you are consistent with the marking and rewards.


Sit
Sitting on command is a very easy and basic behavior that all dogs should know. In the previous example we using shaping to develop a behavior, but this time we’ll use luring -- shaping a sit can be very time consuming and tedious for a brand new puppy owner, especially if they are inexperienced.

Begin with your dog in front of you, presumably standing up, with you on your knees or sitting down. Place a treat in your hand, near the tips of your fingers, and hold it just above your dog’s nose. When he reaches for the treat, don’t let him have it. Slowly move your hand further towards his eyes and even above his head. As he tries to track the treat with his eyes, he should naturally adopt a sit position when it’s almost directly over his head. The instant that his butt actually touches the ground, click and treat.

Bear in mind that you haven’t said a word to him at this point. Do this a few more times until it’s clear that he’s catching on to what you want out of him. When he is sitting as soon as you get the treat above his nose, it’s time to cue the behavior verbally. Start saying “Sit” as soon as his butt hits the ground, then click and treat. Begin verbally cueing earlier and it won’t take long for him to catch the connection between the cue and the behavior.

Once you have the verbal cue established, and the dog is sitting every time you verbally cue, it’s time to fade the lure. Repeat the exercise as if you’re holding a treat, but without an actual treat. Gradually move towards nothing but the verbal cue -- when it becomes reliable, you’re done.

Keep in mind that dogs understand physical cues or gestures much better than verbal cues, so you may choose to use something similar to the luring motion as a gestured "sit" cue in addition to your verbal cue.


Down
The typical “sphinx” down is another trick taught easily via luring. Many people teach Down from a sitting position, but in this example it’s taught from a standing position. The reason for this is that in competitive AKC obedience, a formal down usually expects that the dog’s front elbows touch ground simultaneously with their back end.

Begin in the same position as before, sitting down or on your knees, dog in front of you, standing up. Holding a treat as before, move your hand to directly beneath your dog’s chest. Hopefully, the dog will lean backwards and down to investigate the treat. As soon as both elbows and butt are on the ground, click and treat. You can then repeat and eventually proceed to verbal cueing as described above.

If your dog refuses to lean back, you can try the “tunnel” approach. Sit down and face perpendicular to your dog. Place your feet in front of your chest with your knees bent and raised. This should create a “tunnel” underneath your legs. Adjust the height appropriately to your dog. Then lure the dog through your legs using the treat, making sure to click and treat only when his elbows and butt are fully on the ground.

MrFurious
Dec 11, 2003
THINKS HE IS BEST AT DOGS (is actually worst at dogs!!!)





Socialization with your new puppy is a critical part of his development. This cannot be stressed enough. Dr. Ian Dunbar believes that socialization should begin within the first two weeks of birth, and the puppy should meet over 100 new people and dogs within the first 8 weeks of life.

Obviously this is an intimidating and difficult task to achieve for a new puppy owner, so you shouldn’t feel guilty if this is beyond your reach, and most or all of this period is out of your control anyways.. By the same respect, socialization behaviors are learned very early in life and tend to “stick” from that point forward.

The important thing for new owners to focus on is to aggressively socialize their new family members with as many people and dogs as possible, but to also structure these situations to be positive. Use people and dogs that you know and trust whenever possible and attempt to enroll in puppy kindergarten as well. Use the guidelines for finding trainers above to locate a puppy kindergarten class and trainer that you trust.

When selecting a class, make sure that the class is off-leash. Many puppy classes are not off leash and this tends to lead to increased frustration for both owners and puppies as they attempt to deal with the restraint. Puppy kindergarten is about socialization more than training.

For more details on what is and is not advised in regards to socialization, please check out this article on Karen Pryor's website: http://www.clickertraining.com/node/3953


As soon as possible after obtaining your puppy, you need to arrange to see your veterinarian and take care of vaccinations. The recommended vaccinations for your puppy will vary based upon location and other risk factors, so talk to your veterinarian. A list of the diseases that are commonly vaccinated against is available in the Diseases and Parasites section.

Note:We frequently hear from people that their vet has recommended that their dog stay indoors and not mean anyone until they have finished all rounds of their vaccines. This is a statement made by the vet who has the best interests of the dog's medical health in mind, but is frequently phrased such that owners may be ignoring the behavioral consequences of this advice if taken at face value. Topoisermaese has an excellent post on the subject here: http://forums.somethingawful.com/sh...0#post414850980
In summary, socialization at a young age is key, and you must balance it with a safe environment that is not going to increase the risk of disease to your young puppy. This is best accomplished by finding a good puppy socialization or kindergarten class that will require all dogs to provide proof of vaccination before entering the classroom.

What is MDR1 and why does it matter?
MDR1, or Multi-Drug Resistance 1, is a genetic mutation affecting herding breeds. Specific breeds are more or less predisposed to the condition, and you can find a complete list here. In general, this should not be something of concern to you, even if you own one of these breeds, but feel free to discuss it with your vet.

MDR1 affects the performance of a variety of different drugs and you need to be aware of these issues for the safety of your dog. One of the most common problems is with Ivermectin, a de-wormer and antiparasitic often used on young dogs. Dogs with the MDR1 mutation that take Ivermectin can suffer permanent neurological damage as a result.

You can find a more comprehensive list of drugs that are affected by the MDR1 mutation here. If you have a herding breed, be sure that you talk to your vet and consider testing for the MDR1 mutation.

Khelmar(a vet) posted:

The current dosages of ivermectin in prescription heartworm preventatives aren't high enough to cause issues, even in dogs with an MDR-1 mutation. The only time it's an issue NOW is generally when people try to make their own HW preventative from injectible cattle Ivomec, which is a bad idea for a lot of reasons. Frankly, if it's a Sheltie or a Collie, we just assume it's an MDR-1 mutant and go from there.



If you obtained your new puppy from a rescue organization or shelter, it has likely already been spayed or neutered. If that’s the case, feel free to skip this section.

The question of when in your puppy’s life to spay and neuter is a matter of some debate. Ultimately the decision is between you and your vet, but here’s a brief rundown of some of the talking points.

Traditionally, spaying/neutering has been performed just before the first heat cycle, usually at 6 to 9 months of age, but newer studies are beginning to promote spaying at an earlier age. Earlier spaying appears to reduce the risk of breast cancer in females (dramatically if it’s before the first heat cycle). There is some evidence of behavioral benefits in male dogs neutered at a younger age as well, although there appear to be some trade-offs to these benefits -- dogs neutered at early ages are often described as longer limbed, suggesting that there are growth hormone effects as a result of the procedure.

An expansive starter article can be found here (Thanks to Ceridwen).

MrFurious fucked around with this message at 18:56 on Jun 11, 2013

MrFurious
Dec 11, 2003
THINKS HE IS BEST AT DOGS (is actually worst at dogs!!!)





Housetraining is very, very easy in terms of mechanics. The problems people have with housetraining are almost invariably due to a misunderstanding of canine behavior or a lack of consistency and dedication on their part. In 90% of all housetraining cases, the problem lies with the humans rather than the canine and it is an issue of communication. In the other instances, there is usually an underlying medical condition complicating the issue.

I’ve written an additional document that is freely available here. I have worked very hard in an attempt to make this as close to an all-encompassing guide as is feasible. If you have a specific question that you don’t feel has been answered, feel free to post for assistance.

MrFurious’ Housetraining Guide



Mouthing and biting with puppies is a very common issue. The good news is that it’s relatively easy to fix, the bad news is that the fix takes time. First and foremost, owners need to understand and bear in mind that, for very young puppies (3 months and less), biting and mouthing is a critical part of their development. This is the only time that you can train a soft mouth with your dog, so take advantage of that.

To teach bite inhibition and soft mouthing to your dog, you need to react the same way as another puppy would during play. If your dog is mouthing on you gently, it’s okay to tolerate this (though not necessarily encourage it).

When, instead, your dog greets you with a firm chomp on your fingers, let out a loud yelp. Most people recommend that you make a high-pitched yelp much like a puppy in pain would. The intent is that this should generate a startle response and immediately stop the mouthing. It has been my experience that this rarely works, and that’s backed up by the experience of Pat Miller. Your response to inappropriate mouthing and biting should be to immediately stand up and calmly remove yourself from the room. Running will invoke a chase game, so it’s very important that you do this slowly but confidently. Completely ignore the dog on your way out of the room and stay out for a minimum of 60 seconds.

Crating your dog in situations like this is a mistake. It doesn’t tie the consequence to the behaviour in the brain of the dog very well, and it’s also an excellent way to “poison” the crate, impeding or eroding progress you’ve already made with crate training.

The rule of thumb with mouthing, biting, and any other inappropriate behavior is that when it occurs, the game ends. In this case, this means that the “toy” (this is you) disappears.



Chewing on things like power cords, furniture, walls and everything else in your home is another common issue for puppies. This is usually due to puppies teething and trying to relieve the pain in their gums that results, but sometimes it’s just fun. You treat these issues by redirecting on to appropriate objects and removing the opportunity to chew on the things they shouldn’t be.

When you catch your little buddy chewing on the extension cord, start by getting the dog’s attention and handing him a chew toy. If he takes it, immediately praise heavily. Rinse and repeat as often as possible. At the same time, make sure that you adjust the environment to prevent chewing on the object in the future. If it’s a cord, cover it with a cord protector or re-route it. If it’s your shoes, make the effort to put them in the closet and close the door.

In some cases, you can’t remove the object, such as the kitchen table leg. If you’re not getting the results you need, you can up the ante with a mild positive punishment as well. Start with an aversive spray such as Grannick’s Bitter Apple. You can also use chili powder, white vinegar or hot sauce -- all dogs are different (mine loves hot sauce for example). Coat the chewed item in the spray (don’t spray the animal -- your timing will never be appropriate) and hope for the best.


Puppies, like babies, have a tendency to get sick. If you are socializing them right they will be exposed to all manner of people and dogs and even with all the precautions you can take there is a good chance they will pick something up. If your puppy seems sick you need to call your veterinarian. This is merely a list of common ailments.

Diseases commonly vaccinated against:
  • Parvovirus
    Parvo is a highly contagious virus that is spread through feces. An infected dog sheds massive amounts of the virus even before becoming symptomatic and the virus can remain in an environment for up to 7 months without proper disinfection. This makes it easy to track the virus into your home even if you are vigilant about not taking your puppy anywhere that may be infected. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea (often with blood), lethargy, fever, and dehydration. Parvo is a very serious disease that is frequently fatal so if your puppy starts to show any signs it is vital that you get them to the vet as soon as possible for treatment. The vaccine for parvo is highly effective and generally given at 9, 12, and 14 weeks but your vet should be able to advise you on the proper schedule for your specific dog and your area.

  • Distemper
    Canine distemper is spread through the inhalation or ingestion of infected body fluids. Skunks, raccoons, and foxes can transmit the virus even if you prevent your puppy from interacting with strange dogs. The disease causes a high fever, discharge from the eyes and nose, pneumonia, vomiting, and diarrhea. Distemper often causes swelling in the brain that can leave permanent disability such as neurological damage or blindness even if treatment is successful. The distemper vaccine is given in combination with the parvo vaccine in most cases. Distemper is fatal in more than half of all cases so vaccination and early diagnosis in case of exposure is critical.

  • Adenovirus
    Canine adenovirus has two types. Type 2 is a respiratory illness similar to kennel cough while type 1 is a more serious liver infection. Both are spread through inhaled body fluids and can be transmitted by wildlife as well as dogs. There is a vaccine for type 2 that also protects against type 1 and is generally given as a combination vaccine with parvo and distemper.

  • Parainfluenza and Bordatella
    Canine parainfluenza is a highly contagious respiratory disease often associated with kennel cough, bordatella. These pathogens can cause nasal discharge, labored breathing, a severe unproductive cough, and can lead to pneumonia in some cases. They are frequently spread in boarding, grooming or day care facilities so it is important that your puppy is vaccinated against the virus and that any facilities you frequent require all dogs to be up to date on vaccination.

  • Leptospirosis
    Leptospirosis is a disease caused by a tiny organism called a spirochete that is found most often in standing water such as puddles and ponds that have been contaminated by urine, generally after heavy rains. Dogs can become infected by wading in, drinking, or even sniffing infested water sources or urine puddles. The spirochete spreads throughout the dog’s body and tends to primarily settle in the kidneys and liver, sometimes causing permanent damage.
    Symptoms of a leptospira infection are fever, stiffness, depression, loss of appetite, and may progress quickly to jaundice, bloody urine, and eye inflammation. If your dog develops leptospirosis you also risk contracting it yourself through contact with its urine. If leptospirosis is a common problem in your area your vet may suggest vaccinating your dog yearly. The vaccine is not 100% effective so it is important to not let your pup play in or drink from puddles in areas with a lot of wildlife that may spread the spirochete.

Potential Vaccine Reactions to be Aware of
Currently there are a lot of unwarranted feelings of distrust towards vaccinations of both people and pets. Vaccines will not cause your pet to become autistic and “vaccinosis” has no clinical research supporting it. If you are concerned about the number or frequency of vaccinations your puppy is getting please discuss it with your vet. A mild fever, mild lethargy, and a decreased appetite for 1-2 days aren't a reaction to the vaccine - that shows the vaccine worked. Vaccines work by stimulating a response from the immune system, which causes fever and a mild malaise. If you notice vomiting, hives, facial swelling, itching, increased noise while breathing, or difficulty breathing, you need to call your vet right away. Those are signs that the immune system is over-reacting, and can develop into a life-threatening problem within a few hours.

Puppy Warts
Puppy warts, or canine oral papilloma virus, are common in puppies that are well socialized and spend a lot of time visiting places with other dogs. The warts generally appear on the mouth and lips and are more common on dogs under 2 than in adult dogs. They are not dangerous, although they can be painful, and usually subside within 6 weeks. If the warts impede your puppy’s eating a vet may recommend removing them. Puppy warts are not transmissible to people but you may not be able to bring your dog to daycare or socialization classes until they clear up depending on facility guidelines.

UTIs (Urinary Tract Infections)
UTIs are common in dogs, especially females. The infections are painful and can cause frequent urination in inappropriate locations. If your puppy is difficult to housetrain or has regressed suddenly it is important to bring in a urine sample to your vet to rule out a UTI. Other symptoms are increased thirst, incontinence, whimpering during urination, and bloody or strong smelling urine. Untreated UTIs can lead to kidney infections or worse, resulting in a much more expensive trip to the vet (and subsequent recovery) than the $30 worth of antibiotics.

Parasites

  • Heartworm
    Heartworms are a parasite that inhabits the heart, lungs and blood vessels of a dog. Females can grow up to a foot long and cause abnormal heart and lung function, enlarged liver, and kidney problems. The earliest symptoms are a cough and exercise intolerance and heartworm infection can be detected by a simple blood test in many cases. The heartworm larvae are spread through infected mosquitoes so your vet may not recommend heartworm preventative if you live in an area where heartworm carrying mosquitoes are not endemic.



    If you live in an area where heartworm is an issue it is very important that your dog remains on preventative. They are available in chewable pill or spot on forms but are generally prescription only so you will need to talk to your vet about the medications available to you.

    There is currently a shortage of the immiticide used to treat heartworm infections in dogs. If your dog becomes infected the treatment may be unavailable or prohibitively expensive. Most treatment protocols require a dog to be crated continuously for long periods of time, to prevent dying worms from breaking off and blocking blood vessels in the lung. There's also a risk that a dog may die from treatment. Therefore, it is significantly cheaper and easier to just give the preventative once a month!

  • Intestinal Worms
    All puppies have had intestinal worms at some point. They are passed from the mother through her milk and the pups can also pick them up easily from their environment or from infected fleas. Before you pick up your puppy they should have been wormed by your breeder or the rescue and this should not be a concern to you in most circumstances.

    Symptoms of intestinal worm infections are bloating, vomiting, diarrhea, change in appetite, anemia, weightloss, lethargy, or scooting around on their butt. Some types of worms can be seen in the feces. Tapeworms look like small grains of rice, roundworms look like spaghetti and may also be vomited up instead of coming out the other end. If you think your puppy has worms bring a stool sample (or a sample of any worm pieces that have been vomited up) to your vet. Tapeworms are often transmitted by fleas so you may need to treat a flea infestation before you can eliminate the tapeworms completely.

  • Ringworm
    Ringworm is not actually a worm but a fungus that is highly contagious and can be spread between pets and people through contact with fungal spores. It generally affects the face, ears, feet, and tail but can occur anywhere on the body. It is characterized by a round, scaly rash and associated hair loss and can easily become infected due to scratching. There are several other conditions that can cause similar hair loss so it is important that you take your pup to a vet for proper diagnosis. If your puppy has ringworm there is a good chance you and/or your children also have it so you want to get it diagnosed as soon as possible.

  • Giardia
    Giardia is a intestinal protozoan picked up from water that has been contaminated with infected feces. Giardia infections cause frothy, mucus-y, strong smelling diarrhea. If your puppy suddenly starts pooping indoors when you think they have been potty trained you may want to bring a stool sample to your vet to look for giardia. If your dog is infected be sure to clean up any feces thoroughly to prevent re-infection and watch your puppy for signs of dehydration.

  • Fleas
    Fleas are a common problem in many areas and are easier to prevent than to try to treat once an infestation has started. Fleas can also transmit tapeworms and many dogs are allergic to their bites so it is important to keep your dog on preventatives during flea season. There are many flea prevention options, both topical and oral, see the Flea thread for a summary of your options. Some preventatives have become ineffective in some areas so discuss your options with your vet. See PI Flea Prevention and Treatment Thread (GoogleDocs link)for a more extensive overview of fleas and flea treatments.

  • Ticks
    There are many types of ticks that parasitize dogs and they can transmit many different diseases. Lyme disease is the most common and can cause lameness, swollen joints, pain, fatigue, and personality changes. Your vet may suggest a Lyme test yearly because the disease causes many vague symptoms and is easily treated when caught early. Ticks can also spread ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and tick paralysis in some regions so talk to your vet about what to watch for in your area. To prevent these problems you should use a tick preventative and frequently search your dog for ticks when in areas with high tick populations such as areas with thick brush or tall grass. Some flea preventatives also repel or kill ticks or you can purchase a separate tick repellent collar. If you find a tick on your dog grip the tick as close to the skin as possible with a pair of tweezers and pull straight out or use a tick key or tick spoon. Do not burn, squeeze, or apply anything to the tick as this may cause it to regurgitate blood back in to your dog and increases the risk of infection. If you search your dog twice daily for ticks when he’s at risk, you should be able to easily prevent Lyme disease.



Introducing a new dog (puppy or otherwise) into your home when you already have at least one canine companion can be tricky. If you are concerned about this, here are some steps to follow from fellow poster alifeless:

  • Bring a clean towel to the breeder's and play with the pup on it, then bring it home and have your existing dog investigate it. Feed him treats on there so it's a good positive association.
  • Have the puppy come home with her own bedding to help the transition.
  • Send a worn t-shirt or article of clothing along to the breeder's to put in the crate with your pup.
  • Have the dogs meet on neutral territory like a neighbour's lawn. Walk a little while first.
  • When you get home put your old dog away (or have him out for a walk) so you can settle the new pup without your older dog there.
  • Bring home the pup and put her in a ex-pen in the den or family room with a second barrier like a baby gate in front of it about 6 feet away. You can toss some treats & toys in there, but keep them low to medium value.
  • Leave the secondary barrier up for a few days so your dog can't make contact with the new puppy.
  • Interrupt social pressure buildups like freezing, or hard staring from your dog.
  • After a few days once your dog is showing polite interest in the puppy you can take down the baby gate and let them say hi through the ex-pen.
  • After a few days of this you can put them in the back yard together and allow first contact encounter. This assumes that all ex-pen and gate greetings have been happy and social. If not, do not move onto this until you have the two dogs comfortable with each other.
  • If the dogs like each other, put the more forward dog on a leash attached to a harness and stand on the end. This allows the more unsure one to control the play. It's important to never allow the more rambunctious one to chase down, corner or repeatedly go after the shyer one.
  • If things go well in the yard, maintain the ex-pen indoors except when you have two adults supervising the dogs. This shouldn't be done any sooner than 1-3 weeks after the pup arrives home.

If you see any of the following behavior between the two dogs, be sure to interrupt them both and separate them:
  • Hard stares
  • Growling
  • Aggressive or “tense” postures (flat eyes, still or quivering tail, body tensed)

MrFurious fucked around with this message at 18:34 on Mar 17, 2012

MrFurious
Dec 11, 2003
THINKS HE IS BEST AT DOGS (is actually worst at dogs!!!)

reserved

Captain Foxy
Jun 13, 2007

I love Hitler and Hitler loves me! He's not all bad, Hitler just needs someone to believe in him! Can't you just give Hitler a chance?


Quality Pugamutes now available, APR/APRI/NKC approved breeder. PM for details.

Beautifully done, Furious! This is leagues better and more informative than the old OP, which was getting really outdated.

Yaaay new owners education!

Skizzles
Feb 21, 2009

Live, Laugh, Love,
Poop in a box.


Yeah this is nice and cleaned up, well done. As for people deciding on which breed may work for them, what do you guys think of suggesting they check out the Dogs 101 show on Animal Planet (episodes are also available online)? Of the episodes I've seen they've been pretty good at giving a decent idea of what a certain breed is like and its care requirements. Except the fact they have episodes on "designer dogs." Ugh.

Captain Foxy
Jun 13, 2007

I love Hitler and Hitler loves me! He's not all bad, Hitler just needs someone to believe in him! Can't you just give Hitler a chance?


Quality Pugamutes now available, APR/APRI/NKC approved breeder. PM for details.

Uh, no that show pretty much tells people it's okay to get whatever breed they want, and perpetuates the myth of 'theyre all dogs so just get a dog hurf'. I have never seen any good, practical breed selection from that show and I watch it all the time just to look at dogs.

Also did you see the Pit episode? 'locking jaws' was literally mentioned as a fact. I would go anywhere else for dog advice.

For picking a breed of dog, people should always look at their own energy level and personal requirements before looking at aesthetics. Fostering is a fantastic way to really quickly find out what works for your situation and what doesn't.

Skizzles
Feb 21, 2009

Live, Laugh, Love,
Poop in a box.


What the gently caress, I did not see the pit episode, ugh. Nevermind then, clearly I didn't see enough episodes. I do agree about the "tells people it's okay to get whatever breed they want" thing a bit too, they really didn't drive it home how much work some dogs are.

paisleyfox
Feb 23, 2009

My dog thinks he's a pretty lady.




Great new thread, Furious! It's so sparkling and informative!

a life less
Jul 12, 2009

We are healthy only to the extent that our ideas are humane.



I'm not sure if this will be helpful: http://www.embracepetinsurance.com/...dog-breeds.aspx

It was a link I originally found posted in Terrierman - he said he liked the description of the Jack Russell, and looking through more, they're pretty accurate. It might be helpful to point to when people are looking at a few different breeds. (Points off for there being links to things like "Aussiedoodles" but you get the idea.)

Good work on the thread!

MrFurious
Dec 11, 2003
THINKS HE IS BEST AT DOGS (is actually worst at dogs!!!)

a life less posted:

I'm not sure if this will be helpful: http://www.embracepetinsurance.com/...dog-breeds.aspx

It was a link I originally found posted in Terrierman - he said he liked the description of the Jack Russell, and looking through more, they're pretty accurate. It might be helpful to point to when people are looking at a few different breeds. (Points off for there being links to things like "Aussiedoodles" but you get the idea.)

Good work on the thread!

Added. I was also thinking about doing some quick youtube videos for the basic tricks because I'm not that satisfied with the written descriptions. Plus they're just so difficult to follow anyways.

mombot
Sep 28, 2010

mmmmmwah - Trophy kisses!


MrFurious posted:

Added. I was also thinking about doing some quick youtube videos for the basic tricks because I'm not that satisfied with the written descriptions. Plus they're just so difficult to follow anyways.

Those videos would be awesome! Thanks!

What is PI's stance on rescuing dogs from auctions? We got Coco from a rescue group that rescued a number of dogs from a puppy mill auction of some sort. Not sure on all the details. I understand rescues reasoning for doing this - they think they are helping. However, since then I've started to rethink my stance on this. I had thought about helping to rescue in the future until I read more about it, and see it as just more opportunity for puppy mills to make a profit. Although apparently, most of the dogs involved in this rescue were dogs that were already breeders or were being sold to be breeders, so in that regard I do see it as a positive that they were rescued and will be fixed and not kept in a lifetime of breeding in horrible conditions. I feel all sorts of twisted grief over this.

mombot fucked around with this message at 23:58 on Mar 11, 2012

Shifty Pony
Dec 28, 2004

Up ta somethin'




College Slice

What are the best ways to prevent the development of separation anxiety? I plan on adopting an adult dog sometime this summer, after I move. I work full time from home so I'm a bit concerned that the dog may become so used to my presence all day that days where I take off for any amount of time may trigger some sort of freak-out.

Dog walkers and even doggie day care are options I could swing without much trouble.

Skizzles
Feb 21, 2009

Live, Laugh, Love,
Poop in a box.


Some tips are not to make a big fuss of your coming and going, and reserve a super delicious amazing treat (like a Kong stuffed with peanut butter and frozen) for when and ONLY when you leave the house. Someone else can probably go into better detail.

Kiri koli
Jun 20, 2005
Also, I can kill you with my brain.



CaptBubba posted:

What are the best ways to prevent the development of separation anxiety? I plan on adopting an adult dog sometime this summer, after I move. I work full time from home so I'm a bit concerned that the dog may become so used to my presence all day that days where I take off for any amount of time may trigger some sort of freak-out.

Dog walkers and even doggie day care are options I could swing without much trouble.

The best thing you can probably do to stave off separation anxiety is practice leaving. Since you work at home, you'll be able to start off nice and slow. If you plan on crating, take a good amount of time when you first get the dog to make him/her LOVE the crate. Play crate games several times a day for just a few minutes at a time until your dog is a pro at going and chilling in the crate. Leave your dog in the crate for increasing amounts of time while you work. Some people use it as a nap time place for their dog after a play session or hike, for example.

If you don't plan to crate or once the dog looves the crate, then practice leaving. As Skizzles said, don't make a big deal out of it, have a great treat to associate with you leaving and go through the motion of putting the dog in the crate, getting your stuff, etc. If the dog is showing signs of SA, you can take it real slow by not actually leaving at first, then leaving for a few minutes, etc. If your dog seems to be cool with you leaving (or is just getting used to it like normal with a little barking to see if that will get attention), then just vary the time so that it's unpredictable. Sometimes go hang out outside for five minutes. Sometimes take a trip to the store. When you come back, don't make a big deal out of it. Ignore your dog while you take off your shoes, etc. and then let the dog out of the crate or, if he/she is loose, make them sit or act calmly before you give attention.

If your dog is super clingy or insecure, then there are additional exercises you can do to teach your dog independence and how to handle it when you can't provide attention or your presence 24/7. It will totally depend on the dog though, so you'll have to play it by ear when you get your new dog. Good luck!

Shifty Pony
Dec 28, 2004

Up ta somethin'




College Slice

Thanks! I'm thinking crating is going to happen because many of the rescues pretty much require it (or make you write out a nice long essay about why you won't do it). I'm concerned because one of the breeds I'm considering getting is a Boxer (as there seem to be a bunch of them in need of adoption) and I know they can get separation anxiety pretty easily.

As you said though it will depend on personality and I suppose I should be able to work with the rescues to find a dog which doesn't seem to be predisposed to it. I'm aiming for an adult dog at 3 years old or so, so personality should be well established by then.

edit: Also I can work anywhere I have internet access, so a trip to the local coffee shop, library, or even just sitting on the back porch are all options for quick outings. I also will likely be meeting friends for lunch fairly regularly. Maybe that will help cut down on the risk?

Shifty Pony fucked around with this message at 01:49 on Mar 12, 2012

Bacteriophage
May 2, 2005
CELLUAR LYSIS!

Here's a tip we learned the hard way - make sure all your trash cans either have lids that your pup can't open or hide them under the sink or something. Our puppy got into the bathroom trash and ate a disposable razor head. That was a fun $800 lesson right there. The best part about the whole ordeal is they couldn't find it in his stomach during surgery (when they did his xray they weren't sure if it was still in his stomach or had moved to his intestines) and he ended up safely pooping it out post-op. Horray for puppies...

Actual question, the aforementioned pup (1 year old now) is still having some problems with mouthing. We end whatever we're doing and ignore him if he starts mouthing us but we've been doing this for like 6 months and it doesn't seem like he's getting it. Any tips?

Kiri koli
Jun 20, 2005
Also, I can kill you with my brain.



^^^When the 'end the game' technique fails because the puppy is entertained somehow anyway, I highly recommend playing games where you reward for any behavior that is NOT mouthing. This, in conjunction with encouraging licking, was how we taught our dog to stop mouthing entirely when not invited to during play. The 'end the game' method didn't work on her either.

Here is a video that shows how to teach your dog not to mouth! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c77--cCHPyU

CaptBubba posted:

Thanks! I'm thinking crating is going to happen because many of the rescues pretty much require it (or make you write out a nice long essay about why you won't do it). I'm concerned because one of the breeds I'm considering getting is a Boxer (as there seem to be a bunch of them in need of adoption) and I know they can get separation anxiety pretty easily.

As you said though it will depend on personality and I suppose I should be able to work with the rescues to find a dog which doesn't seem to be predisposed to it. I'm aiming for an adult dog at 3 years old or so, so personality should be well established by then.

edit: Also I can work anywhere I have internet access, so a trip to the local coffee shop, library, or even just sitting on the back porch are all options for quick outings. I also will likely be meeting friends for lunch fairly regularly. Maybe that will help cut down on the risk?

I think it will help a lot. Dogs learn through repetition, so anytime your dog gets to practice the crate being awesome and you leaving and coming back without it being a Big Deal will help and then he won't even notice the difference when you have to travel for real one day rather than just go hang out at the coffee shop for an hour.

Two things to remember: one, exercise is helpful for almost every problem. Making your pup tuckered out will help his crate training (like if you crate at night) or when you aren't home or are busy and you need him to take a nap or be quiet. Two, keep in mind that even an adult dog can suddenly reveal some previously unseen personality traits based on environment. If you select a dog who has an unknown history or hasn't been at a shelter long, then you may not be seeing the same behavior as you will when you bring the dog home and he's suddenly not in a shelter and omg, your shoes look tasty! Most dogs don't do a 180, but it's always good to be prepared and, if you can, see the dog several times or take him home on a trial basis if you really 100% need a particular personality (and even then, most dogs have a settle in period).

Kiri koli fucked around with this message at 02:10 on Mar 12, 2012

a life less
Jul 12, 2009

We are healthy only to the extent that our ideas are humane.



Bacteriophage posted:


Actual question, the aforementioned pup (1 year old now) is still having some problems with mouthing. We end whatever we're doing and ignore him if he starts mouthing us but we've been doing this for like 6 months and it doesn't seem like he's getting it. Any tips?

How are you ignoring him?

You need to look at where the reinforcement is coming from. The act of chewing (on skin, toys, or table legs) is innately reinforcing for a lot of dogs. It can be soothing, fun, or it can be a fabulous attention getting device. So clearly the dog is being reinforced somehow, or else the behaviour would have extinguished on its own. He's getting more reinforcement than you are applying punishment. Behaviour math!

How well are you ignoring him? What do you do? Do you give him a time out? Do you leave the room? Do you tether him? How quickly do you offer a consequence for teeth on skin? (And in this instance, the consequence is the removal of good things, not yelling or intimidation.) For some dogs, time outs in the bathroom can work wonders. For other dogs, what really does the trick is YOU leaving the room. So if you've been trying one thing, consider trying another. And you really need to be 100% consistent in addressing these self-reinforcing behaviours or else they'll continue indefinitely.

Other options are to teach him to grab and hold a toy during play, or before walks, or whenever he tends to get a little excited. A dog with a toy in its mouth can't bite. And if you work hard at making this preferred behaviour more reinforcing than the boring, ignore-inducing teeth on skin, you should see toy-grabbing replace mouthing. You do this via lots of fun play and attention for showing interest in the toy. Or you can simply try to catch the behaviour before it happens (identify triggers, then control them). A dog who never gets too riled up indoors probably won't mouth you too much.

Malalol
Apr 4, 2007

I spent $1,000 on my computer but I'm too "poor" to take my dog or any of my animals to the vet for vet care. My neglect caused 1 of my birds to die prematurely! My dog pisses everywhere! I don't care! I'm a piece of shit! Don't believe me? Check my post history in Pet Island!


His is a bizarre request but couldnthis possibly be hosted on a separate website (instead of being related to SA forums and goons) so i can throw the link at people? Ive been trying to throw links together for new puppy wners at work but this would be perfect. Heres a slip of paper with the link, its got almost everything info you need. That kinda thing.

MrFurious
Dec 11, 2003
THINKS HE IS BEST AT DOGS (is actually worst at dogs!!!)

Malalol posted:

His is a bizarre request but couldnthis possibly be hosted on a separate website (instead of being related to SA forums and goons) so i can throw the link at people? Ive been trying to throw links together for new puppy wners at work but this would be perfect. Heres a slip of paper with the link, its got almost everything info you need. That kinda thing.

I actually explored that idea previously a little bit for very similar reasoning, but decided it wasn't worth the effort because it would take a huge effort up front (more than this thread, which took me several months juggling between new job and other volunteering), and it would require a lot of time to keep up to date.

Also, having spoken to a lot of new puppy owning coworkers, I can tell you that it doesn't matter what you say to them, they will ignore you 90% of the time. They aren't talking to you about their new dog because they want to solve problems, they want to either brag or commiserate.

Skizzles
Feb 21, 2009

Live, Laugh, Love,
Poop in a box.


Well... could one of us put it on our blog? That was partially why I made my blog, to write down helpful stuff to be able to link people to.

Bacteriophage
May 2, 2005
CELLUAR LYSIS!

a life less posted:

How are you ignoring him?


Our last trainer suggested to just end any interaction with him and just turn away and ignore him for like 30 seconds. We never really left the room but just walked a few steps away from him. I'm taking your advice on upping the ante and try to leave the room until he calms himself down. He's a mess about that though because he's gangly and will paw at our backs or try to tug at our arms if we turn away from him when he's getting all bitey excited. Should we just keep walking away and ignoring him?

a life less
Jul 12, 2009

We are healthy only to the extent that our ideas are humane.



Bacteriophage posted:

Our last trainer suggested to just end any interaction with him and just turn away and ignore him for like 30 seconds. We never really left the room but just walked a few steps away from him. I'm taking your advice on upping the ante and try to leave the room until he calms himself down. He's a mess about that though because he's gangly and will paw at our backs or try to tug at our arms if we turn away from him when he's getting all bitey excited. Should we just keep walking away and ignoring him?

The pawing and tugging at your arms is still highly reinforcing for him. I would either leave the room, or tie a leash to your coffee table and use that as a tether station -- it's easily accessible and does a better job of disallowing your dog to continue to interact with you after the inappropriate behaviour.

I also hope you try the toy-getting to replace the inappropriate behaviour. It's very difficult to tell a dog "don't do that" - we may think it's simple, but it's too abstract a concept for them. The better approach is, "instead of doing that, do this instead". Replacing bad behaviour with acceptable behaviour is key.

And remember, the mouthing, pawing and tugging has worked for almost a year, so it's going to take some time before you extinguish it.

Bacteriophage
May 2, 2005
CELLUAR LYSIS!

a life less posted:

The pawing and tugging at your arms is still highly reinforcing for him. I would either leave the room, or tie a leash to your coffee table and use that as a tether station -- it's easily accessible and does a better job of disallowing your dog to continue to interact with you after the inappropriate behaviour.

I also hope you try the toy-getting to replace the inappropriate behaviour. It's very difficult to tell a dog "don't do that" - we may think it's simple, but it's too abstract a concept for them. The better approach is, "instead of doing that, do this instead". Replacing bad behaviour with acceptable behaviour is key.

And remember, the mouthing, pawing and tugging has worked for almost a year, so it's going to take some time before you extinguish it.

Thanks for the tips! As far as the toy tip goes, should we always have a toy nearby to shove in his mouth when he starts mouthing or is it just as effective to shove a toy in his mouth a few extra seconds it takes me to find a toy and shove it in his mouth? I know with training timing is the key, but how much of a grace period do I have?

a life less
Jul 12, 2009

We are healthy only to the extent that our ideas are humane.



Bacteriophage posted:

Thanks for the tips! As far as the toy tip goes, should we always have a toy nearby to shove in his mouth when he starts mouthing or is it just as effective to shove a toy in his mouth a few extra seconds it takes me to find a toy and shove it in his mouth? I know with training timing is the key, but how much of a grace period do I have?

The less time you allow lapse the better.

Also, if he's uninterested in having a toy shoved in his mouth, you can try to elicit a game of chase. When we teach people how to play with their pups, I see a lot of people just holding the toy in front of their dogs face and pushing it towards their month - not too many pups react to that. Tapping into their prey/chase drive is normally much more successful. Eventually with enough repetitions your pup should go find a toy on his own, but in the early stages the more immediate, fun and engaging you make the replacement behaviour the better.

Instant Jellyfish
Jul 3, 2007

Actually not a fish.



Yay, it's finally done! Great job, Furious.

It would be easy enough to cram all the info into a pdf with all the SA links taken out and host it somewhere if people wanted to share it. That way no one has to build or maintain a whole website or anything. Or just link them to a google doc.

MrFurious
Dec 11, 2003
THINKS HE IS BEST AT DOGS (is actually worst at dogs!!!)

Instant Jellyfish posted:

Yay, it's finally done! Great job, Furious.

It would be easy enough to cram all the info into a pdf with all the SA links taken out and host it somewhere if people wanted to share it. That way no one has to build or maintain a whole website or anything. Or just link them to a google doc.

I was thinking about that this morning. The base document you and I were working on is largely intact. It needs a wipe of formatting -- removing bbcode tags and making sure the other formatting is consistent.

I guess I can take a stab at that, but I'm not going to promise any kind of date on it. Might be a couple months unless someone wants to step up -- I just don't have the time.

Bacteriophage
May 2, 2005
CELLUAR LYSIS!

a life less posted:

The less time you allow lapse the better.

Also, if he's uninterested in having a toy shoved in his mouth, you can try to elicit a game of chase. When we teach people how to play with their pups, I see a lot of people just holding the toy in front of their dogs face and pushing it towards their month - not too many pups react to that. Tapping into their prey/chase drive is normally much more successful. Eventually with enough repetitions your pup should go find a toy on his own, but in the early stages the more immediate, fun and engaging you make the replacement behaviour the better.

Sorry for all the questions but you're so helpful!

Well Garp does love his toys but I think he loves a game of chase more. We have tried to pivot from being mouthy to a game of chase but he always starts out the game by hopping around and trying to nip at us before he will be chased, I don't know if that's just reinforcing more bad behavior? I don't know how to calmly introduce a game of chase with him.

a life less
Jul 12, 2009

We are healthy only to the extent that our ideas are humane.



Yep, that sounds like nipping before a game of chase is definitely being reinforced.

I think I did a poor job at describing eliciting a "game of chase". I meant to explain that instead of holding a toy in his face and hoping he'll play with it, put the toy on the ground and run it away from the dog, so the DOG chases the toy.

Chase is a great game, but I feel like you should only play it when you have the capability to call the dog back to you mid-game on your terms, and have him recall calmly. You don't want your dog getting into the habit of blowing off your recalls, and chase can encourage a dog to do just that. So, I guess as far as your question goes, chase probably isn't a good game to play until you have better control over his excitement.

Instant Jellyfish
Jul 3, 2007

Actually not a fish.



Alright, I have compiled the thread into a pdf with a changed intro, links to some books and videos recommended instead of the training thread, and I think I got all of the SA links off. I just don't know where to host it. I'll also work on making the google doc we planned the thread out on readable and accessible for folks. Gotta spread that knowledge!

Edit: Here is the thread in a google doc you can share with folks.

Instant Jellyfish fucked around with this message at 18:53 on Mar 12, 2012

Kerfuffle
Aug 16, 2007

The sky calls to us~


Oh yeah. I pdf'd the flea megathread since it slips into archives. I did take out all the poster names just to make it more accessible to non-SA/internet people though.

http://www.mediafire.com/?2oqliax4h5o7ydc

MrFurious
Dec 11, 2003
THINKS HE IS BEST AT DOGS (is actually worst at dogs!!!)

Kerfuffle posted:

Oh yeah. I pdf'd the flea megathread since it slips into archives. I did take out all the poster names just to make it more accessible to non-SA/internet people though.

http://www.mediafire.com/?2oqliax4h5o7ydc

Can you put it on GoogleDocs? That way people can just read it. I'll edit the link in.

ButWhatIf
Jun 24, 2009

HA HA HA


I'm really skeptical about the addition of the Volhard Puppy Aptitude Test in the OP. There's no actual science behind it and it uses all manner of outdated concepts ("elevation dominance" = does puppy struggle when lifted off the ground, lol) to gauge which puppies are supposedly right for which families. The testers don't even use the same methods as one another, and they assume a whole ton about things like "obedience," which they gauge by seeing if a puppy has a natural retrieve drive. It's largely a waste of time and makes way too many assumptions about the individual puppies on one single occasion.

Earlier someone had a question about separation anxiety and how to help combat it. I typed up a lengthy post on the subject of sep anx and treating it here. It's kind of spergy because it came directly out of my SSCS course notes, but it might be helpful.

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Kerfuffle
Aug 16, 2007

The sky calls to us~


MrFurious posted:

Can you put it on GoogleDocs? That way people can just read it. I'll edit the link in.
There you go:
https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B2...jWXUxa1RDaU5BZw

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