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enraged_camel
Jul 4, 2007




drat. A hundred people in one month?!

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ImplicitAssembler
Jan 24, 2013



enraged_camel posted:



drat. A hundred people in one month?!

Wot? No.

enraged_camel
Jul 4, 2007



/shrug

That's from one of the books strongly recommended in the OP, titled "BEFORE You Get Your Puppy".

https://www.dogstardaily.com/files/...our%20Puppy.pdf

ImplicitAssembler
Jan 24, 2013



So, the breeder needs to have a 100 people come around, who are all relatively safe in terms of diseaeses? and probably all in the last 4 weeks.
Sorry, wont happen anywhere.

GoodBee
Apr 8, 2004




I didn't read any of the puppy books in the OP because I adopted adult dogs.

Medullah
Aug 13, 2003

FEAR MY SHARK ROCKET IT REALLY SUCKS AND BLOWS


I rescued my Shepherd, she's about 2 years old. She needs socialization BADLY, she's amazing on her leash almost all the time, but whenever there's a dog she goes nuts barking and trying to get at them. But this social distancing is killing any attempt to get her used to those dogs.

GoodBee
Apr 8, 2004




But your dog isn't "ruined" though, right?

Submarine Sandpaper
May 27, 2007



It certainly helps to be able to do brewery runs with a puppy but 100 by week four is probably the same person 100 times.

deety
Aug 2, 2004

zombies + sharks = fun



We got our pup at four months, and socializing has been a struggle. She's great with most people and loves to be petted and fussed over, but it can be tricky to take her out (back when we could go out) because sometimes she'll decide she just doesn't like one random guy (and it's always a guy) at a table nearby and bark at them until we get her out of there. She's wary of men with beards even when she's met them before and accepted treats and pets from them. And she's also scared of kids, which has been hard to keep working on now that we can't meet up with our friends with kids or go sit in a park where she can watch the scary monster children from a safe distance.

She's still young yet, less than a year and a half, but I'm not sure we'll ever end up with the chill bar dog we were hoping for. That's okay though. We'll keep working on it once it's safe to, but if she doesn't get to that point, then whatever. She's been a great quarantine buddy, and she does really well with visitors to the house. She's definitely not "ruined" even if there are some situations we may need to manage or avoid.

Mozi
Apr 4, 2004

one step done and another begun


Nap Ghost

I recently adopted a 8-9 month old pup who seems to have had an abusive history and then was a stray. After taking him the local vet for the first time they gave me a pamphlet on dealing w/ fear of strangers that boiled down to 'if it's past 8 weeks it's too late, also he needs to meet a hundred people.' I called the vet back and said basically what is the point of giving me this if it's apparently too late anyways and given the current social situation. Can't say that they had a really good answer.





I'm going to try just driving him around town slowly so he can see things out the car window and see how that goes.

Lord Grundle
Sep 5, 2011


enraged_camel posted:

/shrug

That's from one of the books strongly recommended in the OP, titled "BEFORE You Get Your Puppy".

https://www.dogstardaily.com/files/...our%20Puppy.pdf

I used that book as well from the recommendations of this thread. I do think the majority of it is really good information, but stuff like the page you posted just gave me anxiety that I was forever ruining my dog by not having him meet enough people. Also there was a part about potty training that pretty much said that a single mistake will set you back a whole month in training, which also drove me crazy when an accident happened. I think these parts may just be hyperbole to get readers to understand that these things are important in that stage of the puppy's life because otherwise it's almost impossible to accomplish.

I definitely didn't follow the book 100% and it was very stressful raising this monster for the first year and a half but he's a real good boy now

DarkSoulsTantrum
Apr 6, 2011

this kills the crab

Sure, they're visually impressive, but a lot of posters find large avatars physically uncomfortable. Furthermore, the owners of large avatars often rely on their size alone and don't bother to develop more refined posting techniques.


Grimey Drawer

Lord Grundle posted:

Also there was a part about potty training that pretty much said that a single mistake will set you back a whole month in training,


Holy cow. Between this and worrying about introducing 100 (!!!) people before 12 weeks, the puppy is gonna be worse off just from picking up on your anxiety over every little thing. Your dog isnít going to turn into a vicious carpet-pissing monster because you didnít catch her one time when she pooped in the living room.

StrixNebulosa
Feb 14, 2012

You cheated not only the game, but yourself.
But most of all, you cheated BABA


DarkSoulsTantrum posted:

Holy cow. Between this and worrying about introducing 100 (!!!) people before 12 weeks, the puppy is gonna be worse off just from picking up on your anxiety over every little thing. Your dog isn’t going to turn into a vicious carpet-pissing monster because you didn’t catch her one time when she pooped in the living room.

I got Apollo when he was roughly a year old (probably under by a few months) and he peed in the house twice, pooped in it three times, and figured himself out within a month. And this isn't a puppy, this is a teenager who came from a shelter and was generally potty trained. I learned his signals for "I need to go NOW" and he learned my rhythm and several years later he hasn't made a mess in here since, well, the beginning.

As long as you're consistent and firm with your pooch, they'll be okay. It's hard to break a dog, provided you're not doing alpha-roll dominance bullshit.

Dixville
Nov 4, 2008

I HAVE GOOD INTENTIONS AND DID AN OOPS BUT YOU KNOW WHAT SHIT HAPPENS. ps tom brady is GOAT


Ham Wrangler

luscious posted:

Sherlock had to get a mast cell tumor removed. It was about the size of a nipple. The vet warned us before we came to get him "a large piece of him was removed..." My boyfriend says, "what, like a leg?"

It legit looks like he was picked up by, and fought off, an eagle. It's so badass.

He is healing well, and the margins are all clear. In 6 months we will do another ultrasound and x-ray, but if all goes well, we are in the clear.

Great news! Yeah margins for mast cell tumors are supposed to be 3 cm in all directions so you end up with a huge incision!

enraged_camel posted:



drat. A hundred people in one month?!

Lol wtf
I would rather they meet 10 people who are very different from each other (height, gender, beards etc) vs 100 people who are similar looking.

Boxman
Sep 27, 2004

Big fan of


Medullah posted:

I rescued my Shepherd, she's about 2 years old. She needs socialization BADLY, she's amazing on her leash almost all the time, but whenever there's a dog she goes nuts barking and trying to get at them. But this social distancing is killing any attempt to get her used to those dogs.

Lol this is our girl. She's slowly gotten better (she's able to restrain herself from barking if the other dog is more than 50 feet away, mostly) but it's a struggle. And we were working with trainers to improve her socialization, but obviously that isn't happening anymore.

Lord Grundle
Sep 5, 2011


DarkSoulsTantrum posted:

Holy cow. Between this and worrying about introducing 100 (!!!) people before 12 weeks, the puppy is gonna be worse off just from picking up on your anxiety over every little thing. Your dog isn’t going to turn into a vicious carpet-pissing monster because you didn’t catch her one time when she pooped in the living room.

Oh yeah I realized that and learned to not be so anxious about accidents. I was just stating those are some flaws in an otherwise good dog training book. If anyone else with a new puppy is using that book, those two points should be taken with huge grains of salt.

Instant Jellyfish
Jul 3, 2007

Actually not a fish.



Dog training has really shifted (or should shift in some cases) towards quality over quantity of socialization. You want your dog to experience new things in happy, relaxed ways at their own pace. Just shoving them at 100 people isn't going to be nearly as beneficial as letting them happily observe a handle of varied people in a way they feel comfortable with.

Here's some articles:

https://www.successjustclicks.com/s...-over-quantity/

https://denisefenzi.com/2013/07/socialization/

https://denisefenzi.com/2019/03/more-on-socialization/

Genetics also play a huge role! My working great pyrenees left my property exactly 3 times in her first 6-8 months. She met maybe a dozen people? I did zero conscious socialization work with her because I was focused on making sure she was bonded to my livestock and could do her job. Her breeder had a bunch of kids that played with all the puppies but they definitely weren't doing a puppy culture program or anything. Despite all that she's a totally bombproof dog. She's good with people at the farm, she's good with people in public, she's safe around young kids, she's fine with people in wheelchairs or that move in ways she doesn't expect. You can hug her, grab her paws, look in her mouth, anything you want and she's just happy someone is touching her. She was always going to be that way and I mostly just needed to keep her from having terrible experiences for her to live up to that potential.

So don't freak out if things aren't perfect right now. Do the best you can to teach your dog that new and weird things are not scary and try to enjoy them while they're little.

Dixville
Nov 4, 2008

I HAVE GOOD INTENTIONS AND DID AN OOPS BUT YOU KNOW WHAT SHIT HAPPENS. ps tom brady is GOAT


Ham Wrangler

I thought yall might appreciate this

Damn Bananas
Jun 30, 2007

You humans bore me


Anybody have tips on getting a dog to reliably use doggie furniture stairs? 10 year old beagle who likes to be up high keeps hurting his back by jumping off of high furniture - the bed, the back of the couch, etc. I've prompted him to use the stairs successfully many times, but when he's just up on the furniture and decides to leave on his own, he either jumps down from another side of the furniture or takes a flying leap over the stairs (BAD!)

One thing I've changed is I've completely removed the couch he was jumping off the back of. We tried a sofa table behind it but he kept leaping over that, too, which would have been even more dangerous for injury eventually. I'm going to get some sort of replacement chairs that he can't perch on the back of anymore, but I'm at a total loss to do with the bed. He sleeps in a crate at night lately after his most recent injury, but I want him to be eventually invited back to the bed. And when we are away from home I don't like closing the bedroom door because it messes with the HVAC airflow and makes our bills higher. Haha. Just use your goddamn stairs, idiot dog! (Training tips appreciated)

smoobles
Sep 4, 2014



We used treat rewards and intensively trained our dog to go up and down the doggy stairs for like an hour. In our case though he had arthritis and didn't WANT to jump up and down, which might not be the case for yours.

Damn Bananas
Jun 30, 2007

You humans bore me


Yeah, mine's just happy he's allowed on the bed again after 3 weeks of crate/small-space rest. But he hasn't quite grasped that there are new rules to go with it. I guess it will just take more repetition and practice. And if he jumps without the stairs, it's time to redirect to try again "correctly." Unfortunately this morning my involuntary "Noooooo" after an almost-successful, stair-decline-turned-jump startled him to go hide under the bed and he didn't want to try at all anymore.

cailleask
May 6, 2007



Thanks again for the chewing suggestions everyone! Baby teeth are coming out like mad, so we hooked the puppy up with some antler right in time!

Dixville
Nov 4, 2008

I HAVE GOOD INTENTIONS AND DID AN OOPS BUT YOU KNOW WHAT SHIT HAPPENS. ps tom brady is GOAT


Ham Wrangler

cailleask posted:

Thanks again for the chewing suggestions everyone! Baby teeth are coming out like mad, so we hooked the puppy up with some antler right in time!



Aww lookit those paws

cailleask
May 6, 2007



Dixville posted:

Aww lookit those paws

They seem to get bigger every day! Also they are both black and pink and I love them!!

The Bananana
May 21, 2008

This is a metaphor, a Christian allegory. The fact that I have to explain to you that Jesus is the Warthog, and the Banana is drepanocytosis is just embarrassing for you.




Help.


Help me.


Help me and my puppy.



What is the preferred method for teaching puppy to be ok with a nap, or alone time?

I put her down for an hour, and the whole hour she is crying, barking, howling. Very upset.

Then, unrested, she's extra cranky when i come back, to try and train.

Please advise. 12 weeks old.

Stravag
Jun 7, 2009


It tooks days of only feeding Kedah in her crates before she was ok with being in there without crying and she was 4 year old when i got her. I still can't leave her in the crate in the bedroom and go into the other room for longer than 20 minutes before she cries. I also haven't been working on it for a bit but i would suggest food in the crate and progressively leave the pup in there after its done eating for longer and longer if its at all food motivated. Also have a special toy in the crate its only allowed to have there

Mozi
Apr 4, 2004

one step done and another begun


Nap Ghost

I started with feeding meals in the crate with the door open, then close the door while they're eating and open it when they're done, then increase the time it's closed by a few minutes until they're in for 10 or so, as long as they're not getting really anxious. I stay visible and nearby during this. If they whine I ignore them until they settle down and then let them out. Whenever they come back inside from being outdoors I put some treats in their crate. Then 2-3 times a day I put a treat in there and once they're in I close it up and wait 10 minutes (again, nearby) then open it up. Increase that by 5-10 minutes a day as long as they're doing good. At 30 minutes I start disappearing from view for short periods of time and then lengthening the time I'm out of view over the next week. Now he's quite happy to stay in there while I do whatever I need to. The only setbacks I had were when I left view too quickly in the process and he got anxious and whiny; I cut back on the time then and left the door open as he was eating for a few days and he got back on track. The pup in question was pretty anxious and nervous generally and didn't want to be apart from me so you may be able to go through this more quickly, depending.

Speaking of the pup in question,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swG5C8NWz4Q

He had FHO surgery just three days ago (he had some sort of trauma when he was a very young puppy and his hip joint was completely whackadoo) and his recovery is really great - just trying to keep him from getting too excited sometimes! And I really wish I knew why they make Tramadol so bitter, thanks guys, that's a big help.

Mozi fucked around with this message at 15:41 on May 15, 2020

Bundy
Oct 22, 2013

Fifa fail to see that their petty rules don't apply to us because: BRITAIN



The Bananana posted:

Help.


Help me.


Help me and my puppy.



What is the preferred method for teaching puppy to be ok with a nap, or alone time?

I put her down for an hour, and the whole hour she is crying, barking, howling. Very upset.

Then, unrested, she's extra cranky when i come back, to try and train.

Please advise. 12 weeks old.

This is training, don't try and train other things until this is right. Separation anxiety is normal, leave something that smells of you with the pup and just be in a room together and come and go for a few seconds at a time, gradually building up the time you're gone.

E: Don't extend the time until it's a total non issue that you left for 10 seconds then returned.

Dixville
Nov 4, 2008

I HAVE GOOD INTENTIONS AND DID AN OOPS BUT YOU KNOW WHAT SHIT HAPPENS. ps tom brady is GOAT


Ham Wrangler

Mozi posted:

I started with feeding meals in the crate with the door open, then close the door while they're eating and open it when they're done, then increase the time it's closed by a few minutes until they're in for 10 or so, as long as they're not getting really anxious. I stay visible and nearby during this. If they whine I ignore them until they settle down and then let them out. Whenever they come back inside from being outdoors I put some treats in their crate. Then 2-3 times a day I put a treat in there and once they're in I close it up and wait 10 minutes (again, nearby) then open it up. Increase that by 5-10 minutes a day as long as they're doing good. At 30 minutes I start disappearing from view for short periods of time and then lengthening the time I'm out of view over the next week. Now he's quite happy to stay in there while I do whatever I need to. The only setbacks I had were when I left view too quickly in the process and he got anxious and whiny; I cut back on the time then and left the door open as he was eating for a few days and he got back on track. The pup in question was pretty anxious and nervous generally and didn't want to be apart from me so you may be able to go through this more quickly, depending.

Speaking of the pup in question,
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swG5C8NWz4Q

He had FHO surgery just three days ago (he had some sort of trauma when he was a very young puppy and his hip joint was completely whackadoo) and his recovery is really great - just trying to keep him from getting too excited sometimes! And I really wish I knew why they make Tramadol so bitter, thanks guys, that's a big help.
Lol tramadol is super bitter. My trick for giving pills is to have 3 pieces of cheese or whatever: give the first one, then second one with the pill, then offer the 3rd one. Usually they are so interested in the third piece they will swallow the second.

The Bananana
May 21, 2008

This is a metaphor, a Christian allegory. The fact that I have to explain to you that Jesus is the Warthog, and the Banana is drepanocytosis is just embarrassing for you.




Thanks for the tips. I will apply them, and let y'all know how it goes

Mozi
Apr 4, 2004

one step done and another begun


Nap Ghost

Dixville posted:

Lol tramadol is super bitter. My trick for giving pills is to have 3 pieces of cheese or whatever: give the first one, then second one with the pill, then offer the 3rd one. Usually they are so interested in the third piece they will swallow the second.

Yeah this strategy has been working for me, thanks - poking it into a piece of chicken and plugging the hole with peanut butter. Also washing my hands after touching the pill. Chicken, chicken, doctored chicken, chicken. In the future Iíll ask about a liquid formulation though.

Shebrew
Jul 12, 2006

Is it a party?

Iím about to adopt a dog whoís approximately 2 years old, from Romania, and with an unknown background. According to his foster mom (who will have had him for about a week when we pick him up) heĎa afraid of men. Iím prepping my flat as much as possible to help set him up for success when he arrives, and other than having my boyfriend be in charge of feeding and otherwise be extra quiet around him and give him space, Iím looking for any tips. Any other ideas to set things up so my pup will be be able to be able to be comfortable around men?

StrixNebulosa
Feb 14, 2012

You cheated not only the game, but yourself.
But most of all, you cheated BABA


Shebrew posted:

Iím about to adopt a dog whoís approximately 2 years old, from Romania, and with an unknown background. According to his foster mom (who will have had him for about a week when we pick him up) heĎa afraid of men. Iím prepping my flat as much as possible to help set him up for success when he arrives, and other than having my boyfriend be in charge of feeding and otherwise be extra quiet around him and give him space, Iím looking for any tips. Any other ideas to set things up so my pup will be be able to be able to be comfortable around men?

I don't know you or how you manage your temper, so - sorry if this is obvious. My dog, Apollo, thankfully doesn't do this anymore, but he would cower and roll over whenever my dad or brother showed anger - even not aimed at him. And by cower I mean ears back, sitting, looking at you with these big worried eyes. Fortunately it never got into trembling or tail tucking, but it was this clear "oh god i'm in trouble i'm sorry" behavior. And it would always be more pronounced around them - I can get mad and loud all I want and it doesn't bother him nearly as much. Like, if I get into an argument Apollo will come up and check on me, but there's no submissive behavior. In fact he'll want to sit in my lap, because.

Fortunately for me and unfortunately for you, we never did any specific training or anything to help him calm down - my family tried to befriend him with pets and treats - and now years later he doesn't freak out if people get mad. (Note that there is an exception - my brother has been in and out of our lives, and so when he gets mad, Apollo still gets super submissive and worried - because he doesn't know him as well.) So I have no "do this, it works" type of tips, only the more general - if you get mad, don't take it out on your dog. I've wanted to yell at Apollo, but just don't. He won't understand and it will only scare him. Try to befriend him, and hopefully over time he'll learn that you're one of the good ones - the source of all food and toys, and never someone who will yell or strike them.

Good luck!

Dixville
Nov 4, 2008

I HAVE GOOD INTENTIONS AND DID AN OOPS BUT YOU KNOW WHAT SHIT HAPPENS. ps tom brady is GOAT


Ham Wrangler

Mozi posted:

Yeah this strategy has been working for me, thanks - poking it into a piece of chicken and plugging the hole with peanut butter. Also washing my hands after touching the pill. Chicken, chicken, doctored chicken, chicken. In the future I’ll ask about a liquid formulation though.

You can always get it compounded into liquid or flavored tablets. Usually takes a bit to get that though from the compounding pharmacies

Xarthor
Nov 11, 2003

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Lipstick Apathy

Quick question: We're going to be getting a new area rug for the living room soon (hardwood floors) and I have a 9 month old puppy that I would rather not have pee on said new rug. I know there's that bitter-apple spray you can spray on things like electrical cords to help puppies to learn that they shouldn't chew on cords, but is there anything we can spray on the rug that will give her the signal "don't pee here"?

We take her out quite frequently and overall she rarely has accidents in the house, but on the other hand she has previously randomly peed on cheap rugs we've had in the house and I'd like to keep this one nice.

DarkSoulsTantrum
Apr 6, 2011

this kills the crab

Sure, they're visually impressive, but a lot of posters find large avatars physically uncomfortable. Furthermore, the owners of large avatars often rely on their size alone and don't bother to develop more refined posting techniques.


Grimey Drawer

Xarthor posted:

Quick question: We're going to be getting a new area rug for the living room soon (hardwood floors) and I have a 9 month old puppy that I would rather not have pee on said new rug. I know there's that bitter-apple spray you can spray on things like electrical cords to help puppies to learn that they shouldn't chew on cords, but is there anything we can spray on the rug that will give her the signal "don't pee here"?

We take her out quite frequently and overall she rarely has accidents in the house, but on the other hand she has previously randomly peed on cheap rugs we've had in the house and I'd like to keep this one nice.



Honestly, just keep working on housebreaking. How long have you had her?

Xarthor
Nov 11, 2003

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Lipstick Apathy

DarkSoulsTantrum posted:

Honestly, just keep working on housebreaking. How long have you had her?

Since she was ~4 months. It's weird because she pees outside 95% of the time quite reliably, but the 5% she doesn't is often on a rug. If its one of our cheap 2x3 throw rugs from Home Goods or whatever then who cares of course but this one is an area rug and cost us a few hundred bucks so I'd rather not have her go "oh boy! huge puppy pad for me!"

DarkSoulsTantrum
Apr 6, 2011

this kills the crab

Sure, they're visually impressive, but a lot of posters find large avatars physically uncomfortable. Furthermore, the owners of large avatars often rely on their size alone and don't bother to develop more refined posting techniques.


Grimey Drawer

Xarthor posted:

Since she was ~4 months. It's weird because she pees outside 95% of the time quite reliably, but the 5% she doesn't is often on a rug. If its one of our cheap 2x3 throw rugs from Home Goods or whatever then who cares of course but this one is an area rug and cost us a few hundred bucks so I'd rather not have her go "oh boy! huge puppy pad for me!"

When she goes on a rug are you catching her in the act or is she doing it when no is there to catch her? The best way to break that habit is catching her in the act (donít scold, just grab her and take her outside). If sheís doing it when sheís unsupervised obviously itís harder but just donít allow her to be unsupervised until the habit is broken. She might be equating the feel of carpet for grass. Just be consistent. It might be worth storing the carpet if you can until you feel more confident in her ability to hold it.

Sab669
Sep 24, 2009



Sounds like my 5 year old rescue. I've had her almost 5 months now and she goes outside all the time, but occasionally she still just pees on the carpet, on the floor mat in the bathroom or kitchen. I need to get rid of the carpet in my living room, but yea I don't want to bring a new one into the house while she still isn't getting this.

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Xarthor
Nov 11, 2003

Need Ink or Toner for
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Lipstick Apathy

DarkSoulsTantrum posted:

When she goes on a rug are you catching her in the act or is she doing it when no is there to catch her? The best way to break that habit is catching her in the act (donít scold, just grab her and take her outside). If sheís doing it when sheís unsupervised obviously itís harder but just donít allow her to be unsupervised until the habit is broken. She might be equating the feel of carpet for grass. Just be consistent. It might be worth storing the carpet if you can until you feel more confident in her ability to hold it.

Sheís a ninja whizzer. Silent and always when least expected. Never caught her in the act even once.

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